A short review and primer on event-related potentials in human computer interaction applications

Research output: Other contributionResearch

Abstract

The application of psychophysiology in human-computer interaction is a growing field with significant potential for future smart personalised systems. Working in this emerging field requires comprehension of an array of physiological signals and analysis techniques. Event-related potentials, termed ERPs, are a stimulus- or action-locked waveform indicating a characteristic neural response. ERPs derived from electroencephalography have been extensively studied in basic research, and have been applied especially in the field of brain-computer interfaces. For ecologically-valid settings there are considerable challenges to application, however recent work shows some promise for ERPs outside the lab. Here we present a short review on the application of ERPs in human-computer interaction. This paper aims to serve as a primer for the novice, enabling rapid familiarisation with the latest core concepts. We put special emphasis on everyday human-computer interface applications to distinguish from the more common clinical or sports uses of psychophysiology. This paper is an extract from a comprehensive review of the entire field of ambulatory psychophysiology, including 12 similar chapters, plus application guidelines and systematic review. Thus any citation should be made using the following reference: B. Cowley, M. Filetti, K. Lukander, J. Torniainen, A. Henelius, L. Ahonen, O. Barral, I. Kosunen, T. Valtonen, M. Huotilainen, N. Ravaja, G. Jacucci. The Psychophysiology Primer: a guide to methods and a broad review with a focus on human-computer interaction. Foundations and Trends in Human-Computer Interaction, vol. 9, no. 3-4, pp. 150--307, 2016.
Original languageEnglish
Publication Year30 Aug 2016
Publication statusPublished - 30 Aug 2016

Publication series

NamearXiv.org
PublisherCornell University
ISSN (Print)2331-8422

Bibliographical note

8 pages, 1 figure. Part of a journal paper
Volume:
Proceeding volume:

Fields of Science

  • cs.HC

Cite this

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title = "A short review and primer on event-related potentials in human computer interaction applications",
abstract = "The application of psychophysiology in human-computer interaction is a growing field with significant potential for future smart personalised systems. Working in this emerging field requires comprehension of an array of physiological signals and analysis techniques. Event-related potentials, termed ERPs, are a stimulus- or action-locked waveform indicating a characteristic neural response. ERPs derived from electroencephalography have been extensively studied in basic research, and have been applied especially in the field of brain-computer interfaces. For ecologically-valid settings there are considerable challenges to application, however recent work shows some promise for ERPs outside the lab. Here we present a short review on the application of ERPs in human-computer interaction. This paper aims to serve as a primer for the novice, enabling rapid familiarisation with the latest core concepts. We put special emphasis on everyday human-computer interface applications to distinguish from the more common clinical or sports uses of psychophysiology. This paper is an extract from a comprehensive review of the entire field of ambulatory psychophysiology, including 12 similar chapters, plus application guidelines and systematic review. Thus any citation should be made using the following reference: B. Cowley, M. Filetti, K. Lukander, J. Torniainen, A. Henelius, L. Ahonen, O. Barral, I. Kosunen, T. Valtonen, M. Huotilainen, N. Ravaja, G. Jacucci. The Psychophysiology Primer: a guide to methods and a broad review with a focus on human-computer interaction. Foundations and Trends in Human-Computer Interaction, vol. 9, no. 3-4, pp. 150--307, 2016.",
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A short review and primer on event-related potentials in human computer interaction applications. / Huotilainen, Minna; Cowley, Benjamin; Ahonen, Lauri.

08353v2 ed. 2016, . (arXiv.org ).

Research output: Other contributionResearch

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