Alpine sports injuries in Finland : a retrospective analysis of skiing and snowboarding injuries

Research output: ThesisDoctoral ThesisCollection of Articles

Abstract

The equipment and body mechanics in skiing and snowboarding are different, exposing participants to a distinctive array of risks and injuries. Recreational skiing and snowboarding have gone through major changes during the last decade due to rising popularity of terrain parks and evolution of equipment. The modern skis provide the opportunity to ski faster with less skill than with traditional skis. The aim of this thesis was to provide information on the incidences and the nature and mechanisms of injury, in both recreational and competitive alpine skiing and snowboarding in Finland. Study I covered six seasons (2006–2012), assessing injured recreational alpine ski¬ers and snowboarders at the Levi Ski Resort Ltd., Finland. The data was collected from the ski resort’s files which registers ski lift rides, injuries and conditions leading to injury on a standardized form of all injured persons. In study II, data of injuries in Finnish ski racers during the seasons of 2009 and 2010 were retrospectively studied. The data collection (patient characteristics, mechanism and type of injury, the length of recovery and a subjective outcome at six months post injury) was conducted with a standardized written questionnaire. For study III, all patients with tibial fracture in recreational skiing or snowboarding were reviewed in four hospitals between years 2006–2012. The fracture morphology and injury mechanism were analysed to compare fracture patterns between these two sports. Study IV focused on traumatic brain injuries. All patients referred to the Trauma Unit of Helsinki University Hospital with acute head injury due to skiing or snowboarding between years 2006 and 2015 were reviewed. The overall injury incidence in recreational skiing and snowboarding in study I was 0.98 injuries per 10 000 lift runs. Snowboarders were more likely to sustain upper extremity injuries when compared to skiers (59% vs. 34% p
Original languageEnglish
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Handolin, Lauri, Supervisor
Award date6 Jun 2018
Place of PublicationHelsinki
Publisher
Print ISBNs978-951-51-4157-6
Electronic ISBNs978-951-51-4158-3
Publication statusPublished - 2018
MoE publication typeG5 Doctoral dissertation (article)

Fields of Science

  • 3126 Surgery, anesthesiology, intensive care, radiology

Cite this

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title = "Alpine sports injuries in Finland : a retrospective analysis of skiing and snowboarding injuries",
abstract = "The equipment and body mechanics in skiing and snowboarding are different, exposing participants to a distinctive array of risks and injuries. Recreational skiing and snowboarding have gone through major changes during the last decade due to rising popularity of terrain parks and evolution of equipment. The modern skis provide the opportunity to ski faster with less skill than with traditional skis. The aim of this thesis was to provide information on the incidences and the nature and mechanisms of injury, in both recreational and competitive alpine skiing and snowboarding in Finland. Study I covered six seasons (2006–2012), assessing injured recreational alpine ski¬ers and snowboarders at the Levi Ski Resort Ltd., Finland. The data was collected from the ski resort’s files which registers ski lift rides, injuries and conditions leading to injury on a standardized form of all injured persons. In study II, data of injuries in Finnish ski racers during the seasons of 2009 and 2010 were retrospectively studied. The data collection (patient characteristics, mechanism and type of injury, the length of recovery and a subjective outcome at six months post injury) was conducted with a standardized written questionnaire. For study III, all patients with tibial fracture in recreational skiing or snowboarding were reviewed in four hospitals between years 2006–2012. The fracture morphology and injury mechanism were analysed to compare fracture patterns between these two sports. Study IV focused on traumatic brain injuries. All patients referred to the Trauma Unit of Helsinki University Hospital with acute head injury due to skiing or snowboarding between years 2006 and 2015 were reviewed. The overall injury incidence in recreational skiing and snowboarding in study I was 0.98 injuries per 10 000 lift runs. Snowboarders were more likely to sustain upper extremity injuries when compared to skiers (59{\%} vs. 34{\%} p",
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Alpine sports injuries in Finland : a retrospective analysis of skiing and snowboarding injuries. / Stenroos, Antti.

Helsinki : [A. Stenroos], 2018. 101 p.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral ThesisCollection of Articles

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T1 - Alpine sports injuries in Finland : a retrospective analysis of skiing and snowboarding injuries

AU - Stenroos, Antti

N1 - M1 - 101 s. + liitteet

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - The equipment and body mechanics in skiing and snowboarding are different, exposing participants to a distinctive array of risks and injuries. Recreational skiing and snowboarding have gone through major changes during the last decade due to rising popularity of terrain parks and evolution of equipment. The modern skis provide the opportunity to ski faster with less skill than with traditional skis. The aim of this thesis was to provide information on the incidences and the nature and mechanisms of injury, in both recreational and competitive alpine skiing and snowboarding in Finland. Study I covered six seasons (2006–2012), assessing injured recreational alpine ski¬ers and snowboarders at the Levi Ski Resort Ltd., Finland. The data was collected from the ski resort’s files which registers ski lift rides, injuries and conditions leading to injury on a standardized form of all injured persons. In study II, data of injuries in Finnish ski racers during the seasons of 2009 and 2010 were retrospectively studied. The data collection (patient characteristics, mechanism and type of injury, the length of recovery and a subjective outcome at six months post injury) was conducted with a standardized written questionnaire. For study III, all patients with tibial fracture in recreational skiing or snowboarding were reviewed in four hospitals between years 2006–2012. The fracture morphology and injury mechanism were analysed to compare fracture patterns between these two sports. Study IV focused on traumatic brain injuries. All patients referred to the Trauma Unit of Helsinki University Hospital with acute head injury due to skiing or snowboarding between years 2006 and 2015 were reviewed. The overall injury incidence in recreational skiing and snowboarding in study I was 0.98 injuries per 10 000 lift runs. Snowboarders were more likely to sustain upper extremity injuries when compared to skiers (59% vs. 34% p

AB - The equipment and body mechanics in skiing and snowboarding are different, exposing participants to a distinctive array of risks and injuries. Recreational skiing and snowboarding have gone through major changes during the last decade due to rising popularity of terrain parks and evolution of equipment. The modern skis provide the opportunity to ski faster with less skill than with traditional skis. The aim of this thesis was to provide information on the incidences and the nature and mechanisms of injury, in both recreational and competitive alpine skiing and snowboarding in Finland. Study I covered six seasons (2006–2012), assessing injured recreational alpine ski¬ers and snowboarders at the Levi Ski Resort Ltd., Finland. The data was collected from the ski resort’s files which registers ski lift rides, injuries and conditions leading to injury on a standardized form of all injured persons. In study II, data of injuries in Finnish ski racers during the seasons of 2009 and 2010 were retrospectively studied. The data collection (patient characteristics, mechanism and type of injury, the length of recovery and a subjective outcome at six months post injury) was conducted with a standardized written questionnaire. For study III, all patients with tibial fracture in recreational skiing or snowboarding were reviewed in four hospitals between years 2006–2012. The fracture morphology and injury mechanism were analysed to compare fracture patterns between these two sports. Study IV focused on traumatic brain injuries. All patients referred to the Trauma Unit of Helsinki University Hospital with acute head injury due to skiing or snowboarding between years 2006 and 2015 were reviewed. The overall injury incidence in recreational skiing and snowboarding in study I was 0.98 injuries per 10 000 lift runs. Snowboarders were more likely to sustain upper extremity injuries when compared to skiers (59% vs. 34% p

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