An update report on policies for reducing the marketing of alcoholic beverages

Research output: Other contributionResearch

Abstract

A crucial public health task for current European societies has become the one to comprehend, stay updated and accordingly regulate a massively growing globalized ‘vice economy’. The commerce with alcohol beverages, tobacco and gambling, and, in the near future, a growing range of legalized cannabis products, is a lucrative business that causes great health- and welfare-related harm.
Europe is the heaviest-drinking region in the world. In the year 2016, over ten per cent of all deaths in the European Region were attributable to alcohol consumption. Despite a recent decreasing trend in adolescent consumption, alcohol remains a immensely widespread public health concern linked to injuries, mental health problems and violence (e.g. WHO 2018).
When properly and efficiently enforced alcohol marketing restrictions constitute a cost-effective strategy for reducing harmful use of alcohol. Still, there has been a recent general growth in citizens’ exposure to commercial messages with the alcohol industry’s increased spending on marketing practices (Wilcox et al 2015). Moreover, new marketing investments are made into more subtle Internet-based advertising expressions, setting new challenges from a legislative and regulatory point of view. There is a great need to update current alcohol marketing legislation to correspond to these new realities. Part of this task concerns jurisdictions’ articulation of the principles according to which commercial interests plug into the online lives of citizens, especially those of vulnerable populations. Recent research find that alcohol-related posts of youth on the social media (‘alcoposts’) are socially plugged into a logic of social corroboration. Positive associations with alcohol consumption are more visible than negative ones. Posts are typically placed on participants’ timelines by others (‘tagging’) and they receive more likes and comments than other posts. The social media language risks leading to a normalization of drinking and a great underestimation of alcohol-related risks among teenagers and young adults. (Hendriks et al. 2018a; 2018b)
LanguageEnglish
Publication Year2019
Publication statusPublished - 2019
MoE publication typeNot Eligible

Cite this

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title = "An update report on policies for reducing the marketing of alcoholic beverages",
abstract = "A crucial public health task for current European societies has become the one to comprehend, stay updated and accordingly regulate a massively growing globalized ‘vice economy’. The commerce with alcohol beverages, tobacco and gambling, and, in the near future, a growing range of legalized cannabis products, is a lucrative business that causes great health- and welfare-related harm. Europe is the heaviest-drinking region in the world. In the year 2016, over ten per cent of all deaths in the European Region were attributable to alcohol consumption. Despite a recent decreasing trend in adolescent consumption, alcohol remains a immensely widespread public health concern linked to injuries, mental health problems and violence (e.g. WHO 2018). When properly and efficiently enforced alcohol marketing restrictions constitute a cost-effective strategy for reducing harmful use of alcohol. Still, there has been a recent general growth in citizens’ exposure to commercial messages with the alcohol industry’s increased spending on marketing practices (Wilcox et al 2015). Moreover, new marketing investments are made into more subtle Internet-based advertising expressions, setting new challenges from a legislative and regulatory point of view. There is a great need to update current alcohol marketing legislation to correspond to these new realities. Part of this task concerns jurisdictions’ articulation of the principles according to which commercial interests plug into the online lives of citizens, especially those of vulnerable populations. Recent research find that alcohol-related posts of youth on the social media (‘alcoposts’) are socially plugged into a logic of social corroboration. Positive associations with alcohol consumption are more visible than negative ones. Posts are typically placed on participants’ timelines by others (‘tagging’) and they receive more likes and comments than other posts. The social media language risks leading to a normalization of drinking and a great underestimation of alcohol-related risks among teenagers and young adults. (Hendriks et al. 2018a; 2018b)",
author = "Mikaela Lindeman and Hellman, {Carin Matilda Emelie}",
year = "2019",
language = "English",
publisher = "World Health Organization, Regional Office for Europe",
address = "International",
type = "Other",

}

An update report on policies for reducing the marketing of alcoholic beverages. / Lindeman, Mikaela; Hellman, Carin Matilda Emelie.

19 p. World Health Organization, Regional Office for Europe. 2019, Commissioned report.

Research output: Other contributionResearch

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AB - A crucial public health task for current European societies has become the one to comprehend, stay updated and accordingly regulate a massively growing globalized ‘vice economy’. The commerce with alcohol beverages, tobacco and gambling, and, in the near future, a growing range of legalized cannabis products, is a lucrative business that causes great health- and welfare-related harm. Europe is the heaviest-drinking region in the world. In the year 2016, over ten per cent of all deaths in the European Region were attributable to alcohol consumption. Despite a recent decreasing trend in adolescent consumption, alcohol remains a immensely widespread public health concern linked to injuries, mental health problems and violence (e.g. WHO 2018). When properly and efficiently enforced alcohol marketing restrictions constitute a cost-effective strategy for reducing harmful use of alcohol. Still, there has been a recent general growth in citizens’ exposure to commercial messages with the alcohol industry’s increased spending on marketing practices (Wilcox et al 2015). Moreover, new marketing investments are made into more subtle Internet-based advertising expressions, setting new challenges from a legislative and regulatory point of view. There is a great need to update current alcohol marketing legislation to correspond to these new realities. Part of this task concerns jurisdictions’ articulation of the principles according to which commercial interests plug into the online lives of citizens, especially those of vulnerable populations. Recent research find that alcohol-related posts of youth on the social media (‘alcoposts’) are socially plugged into a logic of social corroboration. Positive associations with alcohol consumption are more visible than negative ones. Posts are typically placed on participants’ timelines by others (‘tagging’) and they receive more likes and comments than other posts. The social media language risks leading to a normalization of drinking and a great underestimation of alcohol-related risks among teenagers and young adults. (Hendriks et al. 2018a; 2018b)

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