Abstract

Abstract BACKGROUND: Synthetic glucocorticoids, to enhance fetal maturation, are a standard treatment when preterm birth before 34 gestational weeks is imminent. While morbidity- and mortality-related benefits may outweigh potential neurodevelopmental harms in children born preterm (<37 gestational weeks), this may not hold true when pregnancy continues to term (⩾37 gestational weeks). We studied the association of antenatal betamethasone exposure on child mental health in preterm and term children. METHODS: We included 4708 women and their children, born 2006-2010, from the Prediction and Prevention of Pre-eclampsia and Intrauterine Growth Restriction Study with information on both antenatal betamethasone treatment and child mental and behavioral disorders from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register from the child's birth to 31 December 2016. Additional follow-up data on mother-reported psychiatric problems and developmental milestones were available for 2640 children at 3.5 (s.d. = 0.07) years-of-age. RESULTS: Of the children, 187 were born preterm (61 betamethasone-exposed) and 4521 at term (56 betamethasone-exposed). The prevalence of any mental and behavioral, psychological development, emotional and behavioral, and comorbid disorders was higher in the betamethasone-exposed, compared to non-exposed children [odds ratio 2.76 (95% confidence interval 1.76-4.32), 3.61 (2.19-5.95), 3.29 (1.86-5.82), and 6.04 (3.25-11.27), respectively]. Levels of psychiatric problems and prevalence of failure to meet the age-appropriate development in personal-social skills were also higher in mother-reports of betamethasone-exposed children. These associations did not vary significantly between preterm and term children. CONCLUSIONS: Antenatal betamethasone exposure may be associated with mental health problems in children born preterm and in those who end up being born at term.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPsychological Medicine
ISSN0033-2917
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2019
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Cite this

@article{b00b86adf1914a478a676a310a74a793,
title = "Associations of antenatal glucocorticoid exposure with mental health in children.",
abstract = "Abstract BACKGROUND: Synthetic glucocorticoids, to enhance fetal maturation, are a standard treatment when preterm birth before 34 gestational weeks is imminent. While morbidity- and mortality-related benefits may outweigh potential neurodevelopmental harms in children born preterm (<37 gestational weeks), this may not hold true when pregnancy continues to term (⩾37 gestational weeks). We studied the association of antenatal betamethasone exposure on child mental health in preterm and term children. METHODS: We included 4708 women and their children, born 2006-2010, from the Prediction and Prevention of Pre-eclampsia and Intrauterine Growth Restriction Study with information on both antenatal betamethasone treatment and child mental and behavioral disorders from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register from the child's birth to 31 December 2016. Additional follow-up data on mother-reported psychiatric problems and developmental milestones were available for 2640 children at 3.5 (s.d. = 0.07) years-of-age. RESULTS: Of the children, 187 were born preterm (61 betamethasone-exposed) and 4521 at term (56 betamethasone-exposed). The prevalence of any mental and behavioral, psychological development, emotional and behavioral, and comorbid disorders was higher in the betamethasone-exposed, compared to non-exposed children [odds ratio 2.76 (95{\%} confidence interval 1.76-4.32), 3.61 (2.19-5.95), 3.29 (1.86-5.82), and 6.04 (3.25-11.27), respectively]. Levels of psychiatric problems and prevalence of failure to meet the age-appropriate development in personal-social skills were also higher in mother-reports of betamethasone-exposed children. These associations did not vary significantly between preterm and term children. CONCLUSIONS: Antenatal betamethasone exposure may be associated with mental health problems in children born preterm and in those who end up being born at term.",
author = "Wolford, {Elina Reetta Anneli} and Marius Lahti-Pulkkinen and Polina Girchenko and Lipsanen, {Jari Olavi} and Tuovinen, {Soile Hannele} and Lahti, {Jari Marko Tapani} and Heinonen-Tuomaala, {Kati Kristiina} and Esa H{\"a}m{\"a}l{\"a}inen and Kajantie, {Eero Olavi} and Anu-Katriina Pesonen and Pia Villa and Laivuori, {Hannele Maaret} and Reynolds, {Rebecca M.} and Katri R{\"a}ikk{\"o}nen",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1017/S0033291718004129",
language = "English",
journal = "Psychological Medicine",
issn = "0033-2917",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations of antenatal glucocorticoid exposure with mental health in children.

AU - Wolford, Elina Reetta Anneli

AU - Lahti-Pulkkinen, Marius

AU - Girchenko, Polina

AU - Lipsanen, Jari Olavi

AU - Tuovinen, Soile Hannele

AU - Lahti, Jari Marko Tapani

AU - Heinonen-Tuomaala, Kati Kristiina

AU - Hämäläinen, Esa

AU - Kajantie, Eero Olavi

AU - Pesonen, Anu-Katriina

AU - Villa, Pia

AU - Laivuori, Hannele Maaret

AU - Reynolds, Rebecca M.

AU - Räikkönen, Katri

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Abstract BACKGROUND: Synthetic glucocorticoids, to enhance fetal maturation, are a standard treatment when preterm birth before 34 gestational weeks is imminent. While morbidity- and mortality-related benefits may outweigh potential neurodevelopmental harms in children born preterm (<37 gestational weeks), this may not hold true when pregnancy continues to term (⩾37 gestational weeks). We studied the association of antenatal betamethasone exposure on child mental health in preterm and term children. METHODS: We included 4708 women and their children, born 2006-2010, from the Prediction and Prevention of Pre-eclampsia and Intrauterine Growth Restriction Study with information on both antenatal betamethasone treatment and child mental and behavioral disorders from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register from the child's birth to 31 December 2016. Additional follow-up data on mother-reported psychiatric problems and developmental milestones were available for 2640 children at 3.5 (s.d. = 0.07) years-of-age. RESULTS: Of the children, 187 were born preterm (61 betamethasone-exposed) and 4521 at term (56 betamethasone-exposed). The prevalence of any mental and behavioral, psychological development, emotional and behavioral, and comorbid disorders was higher in the betamethasone-exposed, compared to non-exposed children [odds ratio 2.76 (95% confidence interval 1.76-4.32), 3.61 (2.19-5.95), 3.29 (1.86-5.82), and 6.04 (3.25-11.27), respectively]. Levels of psychiatric problems and prevalence of failure to meet the age-appropriate development in personal-social skills were also higher in mother-reports of betamethasone-exposed children. These associations did not vary significantly between preterm and term children. CONCLUSIONS: Antenatal betamethasone exposure may be associated with mental health problems in children born preterm and in those who end up being born at term.

AB - Abstract BACKGROUND: Synthetic glucocorticoids, to enhance fetal maturation, are a standard treatment when preterm birth before 34 gestational weeks is imminent. While morbidity- and mortality-related benefits may outweigh potential neurodevelopmental harms in children born preterm (<37 gestational weeks), this may not hold true when pregnancy continues to term (⩾37 gestational weeks). We studied the association of antenatal betamethasone exposure on child mental health in preterm and term children. METHODS: We included 4708 women and their children, born 2006-2010, from the Prediction and Prevention of Pre-eclampsia and Intrauterine Growth Restriction Study with information on both antenatal betamethasone treatment and child mental and behavioral disorders from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register from the child's birth to 31 December 2016. Additional follow-up data on mother-reported psychiatric problems and developmental milestones were available for 2640 children at 3.5 (s.d. = 0.07) years-of-age. RESULTS: Of the children, 187 were born preterm (61 betamethasone-exposed) and 4521 at term (56 betamethasone-exposed). The prevalence of any mental and behavioral, psychological development, emotional and behavioral, and comorbid disorders was higher in the betamethasone-exposed, compared to non-exposed children [odds ratio 2.76 (95% confidence interval 1.76-4.32), 3.61 (2.19-5.95), 3.29 (1.86-5.82), and 6.04 (3.25-11.27), respectively]. Levels of psychiatric problems and prevalence of failure to meet the age-appropriate development in personal-social skills were also higher in mother-reports of betamethasone-exposed children. These associations did not vary significantly between preterm and term children. CONCLUSIONS: Antenatal betamethasone exposure may be associated with mental health problems in children born preterm and in those who end up being born at term.

U2 - 10.1017/S0033291718004129

DO - 10.1017/S0033291718004129

M3 - Article

JO - Psychological Medicine

JF - Psychological Medicine

SN - 0033-2917

ER -