Auditory evoked potentials to speech and nonspeech stimuli are associated with verbal skills in preschoolers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Children's obligatory auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) to speech and nonspeech sounds have been shown to associate with reading performance in children at risk or with dyslexia and their controls. However, very little is known of the cognitive processes these responses reflect. To investigate this question, we recorded ERPs to semisynthetic syllables and their acoustically matched nonspeech counterparts in 63 typically developed preschoolers, and assessed their verbal skills with an extensive set of neurocognitive tests. P1 and N2 amplitudes were larger for nonspeech than speech stimuli, whereas the opposite was true for N4. Furthermore, left-lateralized P1s were associated with better phonological and prereading skills, and larger P1s to nonspeech than speech stimuli with poorer verbal reasoning performance. Moreover, left-lateralized N2s, and equal-sized N4s to both speech and nonspeech stimuli were associated with slower naming. In contrast, children with equal-sized N2 amplitudes at left and right scalp locations, and larger N4s for speech than nonspeech stimuli, performed fastest. We discuss the possibility that children’s ERPs reflect not only neural encoding of sounds, but also sound quality processing, memory-trace construction, and lexical access. The results also corroborate previous findings that speech and nonspeech sounds are processed by at least partially distinct neural substrates.
Original languageEnglish
JournalDevelopmental Cognitive Neuroscience
Volume19
Pages (from-to)223-232
Number of pages10
ISSN1878-9293
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2016
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 515 Psychology
  • AUDITORY
  • EVENT-RELATED BRAIN POTENTIALS
  • SPEECH
  • Nonspeech
  • verbal skills
  • CHILDREN

Cite this

@article{6631dc40d17b4ff48f7e7328db29e713,
title = "Auditory evoked potentials to speech and nonspeech stimuli are associated with verbal skills in preschoolers",
abstract = "Children's obligatory auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) to speech and nonspeech sounds have been shown to associate with reading performance in children at risk or with dyslexia and their controls. However, very little is known of the cognitive processes these responses reflect. To investigate this question, we recorded ERPs to semisynthetic syllables and their acoustically matched nonspeech counterparts in 63 typically developed preschoolers, and assessed their verbal skills with an extensive set of neurocognitive tests. P1 and N2 amplitudes were larger for nonspeech than speech stimuli, whereas the opposite was true for N4. Furthermore, left-lateralized P1s were associated with better phonological and prereading skills, and larger P1s to nonspeech than speech stimuli with poorer verbal reasoning performance. Moreover, left-lateralized N2s, and equal-sized N4s to both speech and nonspeech stimuli were associated with slower naming. In contrast, children with equal-sized N2 amplitudes at left and right scalp locations, and larger N4s for speech than nonspeech stimuli, performed fastest. We discuss the possibility that children’s ERPs reflect not only neural encoding of sounds, but also sound quality processing, memory-trace construction, and lexical access. The results also corroborate previous findings that speech and nonspeech sounds are processed by at least partially distinct neural substrates.",
keywords = "515 Psychology, AUDITORY, EVENT-RELATED BRAIN POTENTIALS, SPEECH, Nonspeech, verbal skills, CHILDREN",
author = "Soila Kuuluvainen and Alina Leminen and Teija Kujala",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.dcn.2016.04.001",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "223--232",
journal = "Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience",
issn = "1878-9293",
publisher = "Elsevier Ltd.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Auditory evoked potentials to speech and nonspeech stimuli are associated with verbal skills in preschoolers

AU - Kuuluvainen, Soila

AU - Leminen, Alina

AU - Kujala, Teija

PY - 2016/6

Y1 - 2016/6

N2 - Children's obligatory auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) to speech and nonspeech sounds have been shown to associate with reading performance in children at risk or with dyslexia and their controls. However, very little is known of the cognitive processes these responses reflect. To investigate this question, we recorded ERPs to semisynthetic syllables and their acoustically matched nonspeech counterparts in 63 typically developed preschoolers, and assessed their verbal skills with an extensive set of neurocognitive tests. P1 and N2 amplitudes were larger for nonspeech than speech stimuli, whereas the opposite was true for N4. Furthermore, left-lateralized P1s were associated with better phonological and prereading skills, and larger P1s to nonspeech than speech stimuli with poorer verbal reasoning performance. Moreover, left-lateralized N2s, and equal-sized N4s to both speech and nonspeech stimuli were associated with slower naming. In contrast, children with equal-sized N2 amplitudes at left and right scalp locations, and larger N4s for speech than nonspeech stimuli, performed fastest. We discuss the possibility that children’s ERPs reflect not only neural encoding of sounds, but also sound quality processing, memory-trace construction, and lexical access. The results also corroborate previous findings that speech and nonspeech sounds are processed by at least partially distinct neural substrates.

AB - Children's obligatory auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) to speech and nonspeech sounds have been shown to associate with reading performance in children at risk or with dyslexia and their controls. However, very little is known of the cognitive processes these responses reflect. To investigate this question, we recorded ERPs to semisynthetic syllables and their acoustically matched nonspeech counterparts in 63 typically developed preschoolers, and assessed their verbal skills with an extensive set of neurocognitive tests. P1 and N2 amplitudes were larger for nonspeech than speech stimuli, whereas the opposite was true for N4. Furthermore, left-lateralized P1s were associated with better phonological and prereading skills, and larger P1s to nonspeech than speech stimuli with poorer verbal reasoning performance. Moreover, left-lateralized N2s, and equal-sized N4s to both speech and nonspeech stimuli were associated with slower naming. In contrast, children with equal-sized N2 amplitudes at left and right scalp locations, and larger N4s for speech than nonspeech stimuli, performed fastest. We discuss the possibility that children’s ERPs reflect not only neural encoding of sounds, but also sound quality processing, memory-trace construction, and lexical access. The results also corroborate previous findings that speech and nonspeech sounds are processed by at least partially distinct neural substrates.

KW - 515 Psychology

KW - AUDITORY

KW - EVENT-RELATED BRAIN POTENTIALS

KW - SPEECH

KW - Nonspeech

KW - verbal skills

KW - CHILDREN

U2 - 10.1016/j.dcn.2016.04.001

DO - 10.1016/j.dcn.2016.04.001

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 223

EP - 232

JO - Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience

JF - Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience

SN - 1878-9293

ER -