Biocultural diversity (BCD) in European cities – interactions between motivations, experiences and environment in public parks

Kati Vierikko, Paula Goncalves, Dagmar Haase, Birgit Elands, Cristian Ioja, Mia Jaatsi, Mari Pieniniemi, Jasmina Lindgren, Filipa Grilo, Margarida Santos-Reis, Jari Niemelä, Vesa Yli-Pelkonen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Urban green spaces (UGS) provide multiple benefits, and public parks in particular have a key role in supporting ecological and social sustainability in cities, contributing to human-nature interactions. We studied the interrelationships between uses, experiences and the environment by adopting a novel concept of urban biocultural diversity (BCD). The concept identifies three interlinked spheres of urban BCD: materialised, lived and stewardship. We conducted place-based research in 33 parks located in four European capitals: Helsinki, Berlin, Bucharest and Lisbon. A total of 1474 visitors were interviewed concerning their motivations to use the park and their experiences during the visit. Using an open-ended survey, we revealed more than 50 motivations for park use and over 100 features people enjoyed during their visits. On the other hand, visitors mentioned far fewer things that disturbed them (60). We revealed that despite the fact motivations to use parks were strongly human-oriented, visitors widely enjoyed the environmental characteristics of parks, and especially nature. We found that parks located in neighbourhoods with low socio-economic status and outside the central area of the city were structurally less diverse than parks located in the city core. The structurally diverse parks enhanced motivations to use them, and increased overall enjoyments of the environment. We revealed clear differences in motivations and enjoyments between cities, implying that the day-to-day practices of people using and experiencing nature varies between cities.
Original languageEnglish
JournalUrban Forestry & Urban Greening
ISSN1618-8667
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 6 Nov 2019
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 1172 Environmental sciences
  • Biocultural diversity
  • Public parks
  • Urban nature
  • urban green areas
  • urban green infrastructure
  • Diversity

Cite this

Vierikko, Kati ; Goncalves, Paula ; Haase, Dagmar ; Elands, Birgit ; Ioja, Cristian ; Jaatsi, Mia ; Pieniniemi, Mari ; Lindgren, Jasmina ; Grilo, Filipa ; Santos-Reis, Margarida ; Niemelä, Jari ; Yli-Pelkonen, Vesa. / Biocultural diversity (BCD) in European cities – interactions between motivations, experiences and environment in public parks. In: Urban Forestry & Urban Greening. 2019.
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abstract = "Urban green spaces (UGS) provide multiple benefits, and public parks in particular have a key role in supporting ecological and social sustainability in cities, contributing to human-nature interactions. We studied the interrelationships between uses, experiences and the environment by adopting a novel concept of urban biocultural diversity (BCD). The concept identifies three interlinked spheres of urban BCD: materialised, lived and stewardship. We conducted place-based research in 33 parks located in four European capitals: Helsinki, Berlin, Bucharest and Lisbon. A total of 1474 visitors were interviewed concerning their motivations to use the park and their experiences during the visit. Using an open-ended survey, we revealed more than 50 motivations for park use and over 100 features people enjoyed during their visits. On the other hand, visitors mentioned far fewer things that disturbed them (60). We revealed that despite the fact motivations to use parks were strongly human-oriented, visitors widely enjoyed the environmental characteristics of parks, and especially nature. We found that parks located in neighbourhoods with low socio-economic status and outside the central area of the city were structurally less diverse than parks located in the city core. The structurally diverse parks enhanced motivations to use them, and increased overall enjoyments of the environment. We revealed clear differences in motivations and enjoyments between cities, implying that the day-to-day practices of people using and experiencing nature varies between cities.",
keywords = "1172 Environmental sciences, Biocultural diversity, Public parks, Urban nature, urban green areas, urban green infrastructure, Diversity",
author = "Kati Vierikko and Paula Goncalves and Dagmar Haase and Birgit Elands and Cristian Ioja and Mia Jaatsi and Mari Pieniniemi and Jasmina Lindgren and Filipa Grilo and Margarida Santos-Reis and Jari Niemel{\"a} and Vesa Yli-Pelkonen",
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Biocultural diversity (BCD) in European cities – interactions between motivations, experiences and environment in public parks. / Vierikko, Kati; Goncalves, Paula; Haase, Dagmar; Elands, Birgit; Ioja, Cristian; Jaatsi, Mia; Pieniniemi, Mari; Lindgren, Jasmina; Grilo, Filipa; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Niemelä, Jari; Yli-Pelkonen, Vesa.

In: Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, 06.11.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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AU - Vierikko, Kati

AU - Goncalves, Paula

AU - Haase, Dagmar

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AU - Ioja, Cristian

AU - Jaatsi, Mia

AU - Pieniniemi, Mari

AU - Lindgren, Jasmina

AU - Grilo, Filipa

AU - Santos-Reis, Margarida

AU - Niemelä, Jari

AU - Yli-Pelkonen, Vesa

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N2 - Urban green spaces (UGS) provide multiple benefits, and public parks in particular have a key role in supporting ecological and social sustainability in cities, contributing to human-nature interactions. We studied the interrelationships between uses, experiences and the environment by adopting a novel concept of urban biocultural diversity (BCD). The concept identifies three interlinked spheres of urban BCD: materialised, lived and stewardship. We conducted place-based research in 33 parks located in four European capitals: Helsinki, Berlin, Bucharest and Lisbon. A total of 1474 visitors were interviewed concerning their motivations to use the park and their experiences during the visit. Using an open-ended survey, we revealed more than 50 motivations for park use and over 100 features people enjoyed during their visits. On the other hand, visitors mentioned far fewer things that disturbed them (60). We revealed that despite the fact motivations to use parks were strongly human-oriented, visitors widely enjoyed the environmental characteristics of parks, and especially nature. We found that parks located in neighbourhoods with low socio-economic status and outside the central area of the city were structurally less diverse than parks located in the city core. The structurally diverse parks enhanced motivations to use them, and increased overall enjoyments of the environment. We revealed clear differences in motivations and enjoyments between cities, implying that the day-to-day practices of people using and experiencing nature varies between cities.

AB - Urban green spaces (UGS) provide multiple benefits, and public parks in particular have a key role in supporting ecological and social sustainability in cities, contributing to human-nature interactions. We studied the interrelationships between uses, experiences and the environment by adopting a novel concept of urban biocultural diversity (BCD). The concept identifies three interlinked spheres of urban BCD: materialised, lived and stewardship. We conducted place-based research in 33 parks located in four European capitals: Helsinki, Berlin, Bucharest and Lisbon. A total of 1474 visitors were interviewed concerning their motivations to use the park and their experiences during the visit. Using an open-ended survey, we revealed more than 50 motivations for park use and over 100 features people enjoyed during their visits. On the other hand, visitors mentioned far fewer things that disturbed them (60). We revealed that despite the fact motivations to use parks were strongly human-oriented, visitors widely enjoyed the environmental characteristics of parks, and especially nature. We found that parks located in neighbourhoods with low socio-economic status and outside the central area of the city were structurally less diverse than parks located in the city core. The structurally diverse parks enhanced motivations to use them, and increased overall enjoyments of the environment. We revealed clear differences in motivations and enjoyments between cities, implying that the day-to-day practices of people using and experiencing nature varies between cities.

KW - 1172 Environmental sciences

KW - Biocultural diversity

KW - Public parks

KW - Urban nature

KW - urban green areas

KW - urban green infrastructure

KW - Diversity

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M3 - Article

JO - Urban Forestry & Urban Greening

JF - Urban Forestry & Urban Greening

SN - 1618-8667

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