Bovine-associated CNS species resist phagocytosis differently

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Abstract
Background: Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) cause usually subclinical or mild clinical bovine mastitis,
which often remains persistent. Symptoms are usually mild, mostly only comprising slight changes in the
appearance of milk and possibly slight swelling. However, clinical mastitis with severe signs has also been reported.
The reasons for the differences in clinical expression are largely unknown. Macrophages play an important role in
the innate immunity of the udder. This study examined phagocytosis and killing by mouse macrophage cells of
three CNS species: Staphylococcus chromogenes (15 isolates), Staphylococcus agnetis (6 isolates) and Staphylococcus
simulans (15 isolates). Staphylococcus aureus (7 isolates) was also included as a control.
Results: All the studied CNS species were phagocytosed by macrophages, but S. simulans resisted phagocytosis
more effectively than the other CNS species. Only S. chromogenes was substantially killed by macrophages.
Significant variations between isolates were seen in both phagocytosis and killing by macrophages and were more
common in the killing assays. Significant differences between single CNS species and S. aureus were observed in
both assays.
Conclusion: This study demonstrated that differences in the phagocytosis and killing of mastitis-causing staphylococci
by macrophages exist at both the species and isolate level.
Original languageEnglish
Article number227
JournalBMC Veterinary Research
Volume9
Issue number11
Number of pages7
ISSN1746-6148
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 413 Veterinary science

Cite this

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title = "Bovine-associated CNS species resist phagocytosis differently",
abstract = "AbstractBackground: Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) cause usually subclinical or mild clinical bovine mastitis,which often remains persistent. Symptoms are usually mild, mostly only comprising slight changes in theappearance of milk and possibly slight swelling. However, clinical mastitis with severe signs has also been reported.The reasons for the differences in clinical expression are largely unknown. Macrophages play an important role inthe innate immunity of the udder. This study examined phagocytosis and killing by mouse macrophage cells ofthree CNS species: Staphylococcus chromogenes (15 isolates), Staphylococcus agnetis (6 isolates) and Staphylococcussimulans (15 isolates). Staphylococcus aureus (7 isolates) was also included as a control.Results: All the studied CNS species were phagocytosed by macrophages, but S. simulans resisted phagocytosismore effectively than the other CNS species. Only S. chromogenes was substantially killed by macrophages.Significant variations between isolates were seen in both phagocytosis and killing by macrophages and were morecommon in the killing assays. Significant differences between single CNS species and S. aureus were observed inboth assays.Conclusion: This study demonstrated that differences in the phagocytosis and killing of mastitis-causing staphylococciby macrophages exist at both the species and isolate level.",
keywords = "413 Veterinary science",
author = "Silja {\AA}vall-J{\"a}{\"a}skel{\"a}inen and Joanna Koort and Heli Simojoki and Suvi Taponen",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1186/1746-6148-9-227",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
journal = "BMC Veterinary Research",
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Bovine-associated CNS species resist phagocytosis differently. / Åvall-Jääskeläinen, Silja; Koort, Joanna; Simojoki, Heli; Taponen, Suvi .

In: BMC Veterinary Research, Vol. 9, No. 11, 227, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bovine-associated CNS species resist phagocytosis differently

AU - Åvall-Jääskeläinen, Silja

AU - Koort, Joanna

AU - Simojoki, Heli

AU - Taponen, Suvi

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - AbstractBackground: Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) cause usually subclinical or mild clinical bovine mastitis,which often remains persistent. Symptoms are usually mild, mostly only comprising slight changes in theappearance of milk and possibly slight swelling. However, clinical mastitis with severe signs has also been reported.The reasons for the differences in clinical expression are largely unknown. Macrophages play an important role inthe innate immunity of the udder. This study examined phagocytosis and killing by mouse macrophage cells ofthree CNS species: Staphylococcus chromogenes (15 isolates), Staphylococcus agnetis (6 isolates) and Staphylococcussimulans (15 isolates). Staphylococcus aureus (7 isolates) was also included as a control.Results: All the studied CNS species were phagocytosed by macrophages, but S. simulans resisted phagocytosismore effectively than the other CNS species. Only S. chromogenes was substantially killed by macrophages.Significant variations between isolates were seen in both phagocytosis and killing by macrophages and were morecommon in the killing assays. Significant differences between single CNS species and S. aureus were observed inboth assays.Conclusion: This study demonstrated that differences in the phagocytosis and killing of mastitis-causing staphylococciby macrophages exist at both the species and isolate level.

AB - AbstractBackground: Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) cause usually subclinical or mild clinical bovine mastitis,which often remains persistent. Symptoms are usually mild, mostly only comprising slight changes in theappearance of milk and possibly slight swelling. However, clinical mastitis with severe signs has also been reported.The reasons for the differences in clinical expression are largely unknown. Macrophages play an important role inthe innate immunity of the udder. This study examined phagocytosis and killing by mouse macrophage cells ofthree CNS species: Staphylococcus chromogenes (15 isolates), Staphylococcus agnetis (6 isolates) and Staphylococcussimulans (15 isolates). Staphylococcus aureus (7 isolates) was also included as a control.Results: All the studied CNS species were phagocytosed by macrophages, but S. simulans resisted phagocytosismore effectively than the other CNS species. Only S. chromogenes was substantially killed by macrophages.Significant variations between isolates were seen in both phagocytosis and killing by macrophages and were morecommon in the killing assays. Significant differences between single CNS species and S. aureus were observed inboth assays.Conclusion: This study demonstrated that differences in the phagocytosis and killing of mastitis-causing staphylococciby macrophages exist at both the species and isolate level.

KW - 413 Veterinary science

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