Central nervous system lymphatic unit, immunity, and epilepsy: Is there a link?

Francesco M. Noé, Nicola Marchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Summary The recent definition of a network of lymphatic vessels in the meninges surrounding the brain and the spinal cord has advanced our knowledge on the functional anatomy of fluid movement within the central nervous system (CNS). Meningeal lymphatic vessels along dural sinuses and main nerves contribute to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, integrating the cerebrovascular and periventricular routes, and forming a circuit that we here define as the CNS-lymphatic unit. The latter unit is important for parenchymal waste clearance, brain homeostasis, and the regulation of immune or inflammatory processes within the brain. Disruption of fluid drain mechanisms may promote or sustain CNS disease, conceivably applicable to epilepsy where extracellular accumulation of macromolecules and metabolic by-products occur in the interstitial and perivascular spaces. Herein we address an emerging concept and propose a theoretical framework on: (a) how a defect of brain clearance of macromolecules could favor neuronal hyperexcitability and seizures, and (b) whether meningeal lymphatic vessel dysfunction contributes to the neuroimmune cross-talk in epileptic pathophysiology. We propose possible molecular interventions targeting meningeal lymphatic dysfunctions, a potential target for immune-mediated epilepsy.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEpilepsia Open
Volume4
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)30-39
Number of pages10
ISSN2470-9239
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Jan 2019
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • acquired epilepsy
  • central nervous system immune surveillance
  • immune epilepsy
  • meningeal lymphatic vessels
  • parenchymal clearance

Cite this

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title = "Central nervous system lymphatic unit, immunity, and epilepsy: Is there a link?",
abstract = "Summary The recent definition of a network of lymphatic vessels in the meninges surrounding the brain and the spinal cord has advanced our knowledge on the functional anatomy of fluid movement within the central nervous system (CNS). Meningeal lymphatic vessels along dural sinuses and main nerves contribute to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, integrating the cerebrovascular and periventricular routes, and forming a circuit that we here define as the CNS-lymphatic unit. The latter unit is important for parenchymal waste clearance, brain homeostasis, and the regulation of immune or inflammatory processes within the brain. Disruption of fluid drain mechanisms may promote or sustain CNS disease, conceivably applicable to epilepsy where extracellular accumulation of macromolecules and metabolic by-products occur in the interstitial and perivascular spaces. Herein we address an emerging concept and propose a theoretical framework on: (a) how a defect of brain clearance of macromolecules could favor neuronal hyperexcitability and seizures, and (b) whether meningeal lymphatic vessel dysfunction contributes to the neuroimmune cross-talk in epileptic pathophysiology. We propose possible molecular interventions targeting meningeal lymphatic dysfunctions, a potential target for immune-mediated epilepsy.",
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Central nervous system lymphatic unit, immunity, and epilepsy: Is there a link? / Noé, Francesco M.; Marchi, Nicola.

In: Epilepsia Open, Vol. 4, No. 1, 13.01.2019, p. 30-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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AU - Noé, Francesco M.

AU - Marchi, Nicola

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N2 - Summary The recent definition of a network of lymphatic vessels in the meninges surrounding the brain and the spinal cord has advanced our knowledge on the functional anatomy of fluid movement within the central nervous system (CNS). Meningeal lymphatic vessels along dural sinuses and main nerves contribute to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, integrating the cerebrovascular and periventricular routes, and forming a circuit that we here define as the CNS-lymphatic unit. The latter unit is important for parenchymal waste clearance, brain homeostasis, and the regulation of immune or inflammatory processes within the brain. Disruption of fluid drain mechanisms may promote or sustain CNS disease, conceivably applicable to epilepsy where extracellular accumulation of macromolecules and metabolic by-products occur in the interstitial and perivascular spaces. Herein we address an emerging concept and propose a theoretical framework on: (a) how a defect of brain clearance of macromolecules could favor neuronal hyperexcitability and seizures, and (b) whether meningeal lymphatic vessel dysfunction contributes to the neuroimmune cross-talk in epileptic pathophysiology. We propose possible molecular interventions targeting meningeal lymphatic dysfunctions, a potential target for immune-mediated epilepsy.

AB - Summary The recent definition of a network of lymphatic vessels in the meninges surrounding the brain and the spinal cord has advanced our knowledge on the functional anatomy of fluid movement within the central nervous system (CNS). Meningeal lymphatic vessels along dural sinuses and main nerves contribute to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, integrating the cerebrovascular and periventricular routes, and forming a circuit that we here define as the CNS-lymphatic unit. The latter unit is important for parenchymal waste clearance, brain homeostasis, and the regulation of immune or inflammatory processes within the brain. Disruption of fluid drain mechanisms may promote or sustain CNS disease, conceivably applicable to epilepsy where extracellular accumulation of macromolecules and metabolic by-products occur in the interstitial and perivascular spaces. Herein we address an emerging concept and propose a theoretical framework on: (a) how a defect of brain clearance of macromolecules could favor neuronal hyperexcitability and seizures, and (b) whether meningeal lymphatic vessel dysfunction contributes to the neuroimmune cross-talk in epileptic pathophysiology. We propose possible molecular interventions targeting meningeal lymphatic dysfunctions, a potential target for immune-mediated epilepsy.

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KW - central nervous system immune surveillance

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KW - parenchymal clearance

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