Changes of occupational class differences in physical functioning: a panel study among employees (2000-2007)

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Abstract

Background Panel studies on changes of occupational class differences in health have given varying results. The aim of this study was to examine changes of occupational class differences in physical functioning and the factors that explain these changes. Methods A cohort of middle-aged employees of the City of Helsinki was followed up for an average of 6 years in two surveys from 2000-2002 and 2007. Hierarchical linear random effects models were fitted to analyse the changes of occupational class differences in SF-36 physical functioning, as well as the contribution of physical and psychosocial working conditions, material conditions, health behaviours and employment status to these changes. Results Lower occupational classes had worse physical functioning at baseline: among women, the SF-36 scores ranged from 50.5 in the highest class to 47.1 in the lowest one, and among men from 52.2 to 48.9, with higher scores indicating better health. Occupational class differences widened during the follow-up due to stronger decline of physical functioning in the lower occupational classes than in the higher occupational classes. The largest difference in the decline of functioning between classes was 1.2 scores among women and 1.5 scores among men. Among women the widening of the class differences could be explained partly by health behaviours and employment status and among men by material conditions. Conclusion Occupational class differences in physical functioning widened due to a faster decline of physical functioning in the lower occupational classes. Health behaviours, employment status and material conditions explained the widening class differences in physical functioning.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Epidemiology & Community Health
Volume66
Pages (from-to)265-270
Number of pages6
ISSN0143-005X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • SELF-RATED HEALTH
  • WORKING-CONDITIONS
  • SOCIAL-CLASS
  • SOCIOECONOMIC CIRCUMSTANCES
  • CUMULATIVE ADVANTAGE
  • BEHAVIORAL-FACTORS
  • CLASS INEQUALITIES
  • REPORTED HEALTH
  • JOB DEMANDS
  • LIFE-COURSE
  • 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health

Cite this

@article{7fe85ed3e8324b7087923ca08fba7801,
title = "Changes of occupational class differences in physical functioning: a panel study among employees (2000-2007)",
abstract = "Background Panel studies on changes of occupational class differences in health have given varying results. The aim of this study was to examine changes of occupational class differences in physical functioning and the factors that explain these changes. Methods A cohort of middle-aged employees of the City of Helsinki was followed up for an average of 6 years in two surveys from 2000-2002 and 2007. Hierarchical linear random effects models were fitted to analyse the changes of occupational class differences in SF-36 physical functioning, as well as the contribution of physical and psychosocial working conditions, material conditions, health behaviours and employment status to these changes. Results Lower occupational classes had worse physical functioning at baseline: among women, the SF-36 scores ranged from 50.5 in the highest class to 47.1 in the lowest one, and among men from 52.2 to 48.9, with higher scores indicating better health. Occupational class differences widened during the follow-up due to stronger decline of physical functioning in the lower occupational classes than in the higher occupational classes. The largest difference in the decline of functioning between classes was 1.2 scores among women and 1.5 scores among men. Among women the widening of the class differences could be explained partly by health behaviours and employment status and among men by material conditions. Conclusion Occupational class differences in physical functioning widened due to a faster decline of physical functioning in the lower occupational classes. Health behaviours, employment status and material conditions explained the widening class differences in physical functioning.",
keywords = "SELF-RATED HEALTH, WORKING-CONDITIONS, SOCIAL-CLASS, SOCIOECONOMIC CIRCUMSTANCES, CUMULATIVE ADVANTAGE, BEHAVIORAL-FACTORS, CLASS INEQUALITIES, REPORTED HEALTH, JOB DEMANDS, LIFE-COURSE, 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health",
author = "Olli Pietil{\"a}inen and Mikko Laaksonen and Pitk{\"a}niemi, {Janne Mikael} and Ossi Rahkonen and Eero Lahelma",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1136/jech.2010.110270",
language = "English",
volume = "66",
pages = "265--270",
journal = "Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health",
issn = "0143-005X",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Changes of occupational class differences in physical functioning

T2 - a panel study among employees (2000-2007)

AU - Pietiläinen, Olli

AU - Laaksonen, Mikko

AU - Pitkäniemi, Janne Mikael

AU - Rahkonen, Ossi

AU - Lahelma, Eero

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Background Panel studies on changes of occupational class differences in health have given varying results. The aim of this study was to examine changes of occupational class differences in physical functioning and the factors that explain these changes. Methods A cohort of middle-aged employees of the City of Helsinki was followed up for an average of 6 years in two surveys from 2000-2002 and 2007. Hierarchical linear random effects models were fitted to analyse the changes of occupational class differences in SF-36 physical functioning, as well as the contribution of physical and psychosocial working conditions, material conditions, health behaviours and employment status to these changes. Results Lower occupational classes had worse physical functioning at baseline: among women, the SF-36 scores ranged from 50.5 in the highest class to 47.1 in the lowest one, and among men from 52.2 to 48.9, with higher scores indicating better health. Occupational class differences widened during the follow-up due to stronger decline of physical functioning in the lower occupational classes than in the higher occupational classes. The largest difference in the decline of functioning between classes was 1.2 scores among women and 1.5 scores among men. Among women the widening of the class differences could be explained partly by health behaviours and employment status and among men by material conditions. Conclusion Occupational class differences in physical functioning widened due to a faster decline of physical functioning in the lower occupational classes. Health behaviours, employment status and material conditions explained the widening class differences in physical functioning.

AB - Background Panel studies on changes of occupational class differences in health have given varying results. The aim of this study was to examine changes of occupational class differences in physical functioning and the factors that explain these changes. Methods A cohort of middle-aged employees of the City of Helsinki was followed up for an average of 6 years in two surveys from 2000-2002 and 2007. Hierarchical linear random effects models were fitted to analyse the changes of occupational class differences in SF-36 physical functioning, as well as the contribution of physical and psychosocial working conditions, material conditions, health behaviours and employment status to these changes. Results Lower occupational classes had worse physical functioning at baseline: among women, the SF-36 scores ranged from 50.5 in the highest class to 47.1 in the lowest one, and among men from 52.2 to 48.9, with higher scores indicating better health. Occupational class differences widened during the follow-up due to stronger decline of physical functioning in the lower occupational classes than in the higher occupational classes. The largest difference in the decline of functioning between classes was 1.2 scores among women and 1.5 scores among men. Among women the widening of the class differences could be explained partly by health behaviours and employment status and among men by material conditions. Conclusion Occupational class differences in physical functioning widened due to a faster decline of physical functioning in the lower occupational classes. Health behaviours, employment status and material conditions explained the widening class differences in physical functioning.

KW - SELF-RATED HEALTH

KW - WORKING-CONDITIONS

KW - SOCIAL-CLASS

KW - SOCIOECONOMIC CIRCUMSTANCES

KW - CUMULATIVE ADVANTAGE

KW - BEHAVIORAL-FACTORS

KW - CLASS INEQUALITIES

KW - REPORTED HEALTH

KW - JOB DEMANDS

KW - LIFE-COURSE

KW - 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health

U2 - 10.1136/jech.2010.110270

DO - 10.1136/jech.2010.110270

M3 - Article

VL - 66

SP - 265

EP - 270

JO - Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health

JF - Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health

SN - 0143-005X

ER -