Chapter 3.5 - Current Trends and Developments for Nanotechnology in Cancer (Book Chapter)

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterScientificpeer-review

Abstract

In spite of the incessant development in medicine and technology, cancer
continues to be one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Conventional systems for cancer therapy that are available in the market have limited and unspecific access to tumor sites. Thus, in the recent years, nanotechnology has been applied to the field of medicine, opening new avenues to the treatment, diagnosis, and monitoring of cancer diseases. This horizon has become closer with a considerable number of nano-formulations being recently approved for commercialization or reaching preclinical and clinical stages. In this context, remarkable advances in nanotechnology led to the emergence of nanodelivery systems that can specifically target an extensive variety of malignant tissues, control precisely the release of the cargos, as well as the ability to improve the biological effects of the immunostimulatory molecules via different mechanisms for cancer immunotherapy. In addition, imaging techniques combined with nanotechnology render extraordinary sensitive and powerful diagnostic
and imaging tools. Multifunctional systems encompassing both therapeutic
and diagnostic functions provide great advantage for tracking, in real time, the drug payloads delivered to the tumour site. The bench-to-bedside translation of the nanomedicines and technologies have introduced a new era in the design and development of innovative, but simultaneously complex targeting nanoparticles for delivery of both therapeutic and diagnostic agents to tumors. In this chapter, we focus on the current trends and developments of nanotechnology for cancer, highlighting some of the most advanced drug delivery nanosystems, targeting strategies, the nanotools used for cancer imaging and diagnostics as well as the recent nanotechnological approaches used for cancer immunotherapy.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBiomedical Chemistry : Current Trends and Developments
EditorsNuno Vale
Number of pages53
Place of PublicationBerlin
PublisherDe Gruyter Open
Publication dateDec 2015
Pages290–342
Article numberChapter 3.5
ISBN (Print)978-3-11-046875-5
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2015
MoE publication typeA3 Book chapter

Fields of Science

  • 317 Pharmacy
  • 221 Nano-technology

Cite this

Ferreira, M., Almeida, P., Shahbazi, M-A., Correia, A., & A. Santos, H. (2015). Chapter 3.5 - Current Trends and Developments for Nanotechnology in Cancer (Book Chapter). In N. Vale (Ed.), Biomedical Chemistry : Current Trends and Developments (pp. 290–342). [Chapter 3.5] Berlin: De Gruyter Open.
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Ferreira, M, Almeida, P, Shahbazi, M-A, Correia, A & A. Santos, H 2015, Chapter 3.5 - Current Trends and Developments for Nanotechnology in Cancer (Book Chapter). in N Vale (ed.), Biomedical Chemistry : Current Trends and Developments., Chapter 3.5, De Gruyter Open, Berlin, pp. 290–342.

Chapter 3.5 - Current Trends and Developments for Nanotechnology in Cancer (Book Chapter). / Ferreira, Monica ; Almeida, Patrick; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Correia, Alexandra ; A. Santos, Hélder.

Biomedical Chemistry : Current Trends and Developments. ed. / Nuno Vale. Berlin : De Gruyter Open, 2015. p. 290–342 Chapter 3.5.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterScientificpeer-review

TY - CHAP

T1 - Chapter 3.5 - Current Trends and Developments for Nanotechnology in Cancer (Book Chapter)

AU - Ferreira, Monica

AU - Almeida, Patrick

AU - Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali

AU - Correia, Alexandra

AU - A. Santos, Hélder

PY - 2015/12

Y1 - 2015/12

N2 - In spite of the incessant development in medicine and technology, cancercontinues to be one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Conventional systems for cancer therapy that are available in the market have limited and unspecific access to tumor sites. Thus, in the recent years, nanotechnology has been applied to the field of medicine, opening new avenues to the treatment, diagnosis, and monitoring of cancer diseases. This horizon has become closer with a considerable number of nano-formulations being recently approved for commercialization or reaching preclinical and clinical stages. In this context, remarkable advances in nanotechnology led to the emergence of nanodelivery systems that can specifically target an extensive variety of malignant tissues, control precisely the release of the cargos, as well as the ability to improve the biological effects of the immunostimulatory molecules via different mechanisms for cancer immunotherapy. In addition, imaging techniques combined with nanotechnology render extraordinary sensitive and powerful diagnosticand imaging tools. Multifunctional systems encompassing both therapeuticand diagnostic functions provide great advantage for tracking, in real time, the drug payloads delivered to the tumour site. The bench-to-bedside translation of the nanomedicines and technologies have introduced a new era in the design and development of innovative, but simultaneously complex targeting nanoparticles for delivery of both therapeutic and diagnostic agents to tumors. In this chapter, we focus on the current trends and developments of nanotechnology for cancer, highlighting some of the most advanced drug delivery nanosystems, targeting strategies, the nanotools used for cancer imaging and diagnostics as well as the recent nanotechnological approaches used for cancer immunotherapy.

AB - In spite of the incessant development in medicine and technology, cancercontinues to be one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Conventional systems for cancer therapy that are available in the market have limited and unspecific access to tumor sites. Thus, in the recent years, nanotechnology has been applied to the field of medicine, opening new avenues to the treatment, diagnosis, and monitoring of cancer diseases. This horizon has become closer with a considerable number of nano-formulations being recently approved for commercialization or reaching preclinical and clinical stages. In this context, remarkable advances in nanotechnology led to the emergence of nanodelivery systems that can specifically target an extensive variety of malignant tissues, control precisely the release of the cargos, as well as the ability to improve the biological effects of the immunostimulatory molecules via different mechanisms for cancer immunotherapy. In addition, imaging techniques combined with nanotechnology render extraordinary sensitive and powerful diagnosticand imaging tools. Multifunctional systems encompassing both therapeuticand diagnostic functions provide great advantage for tracking, in real time, the drug payloads delivered to the tumour site. The bench-to-bedside translation of the nanomedicines and technologies have introduced a new era in the design and development of innovative, but simultaneously complex targeting nanoparticles for delivery of both therapeutic and diagnostic agents to tumors. In this chapter, we focus on the current trends and developments of nanotechnology for cancer, highlighting some of the most advanced drug delivery nanosystems, targeting strategies, the nanotools used for cancer imaging and diagnostics as well as the recent nanotechnological approaches used for cancer immunotherapy.

KW - 317 Pharmacy

KW - 221 Nano-technology

M3 - Chapter

SN - 978-3-11-046875-5

SP - 290

EP - 342

BT - Biomedical Chemistry : Current Trends and Developments

A2 - Vale, Nuno

PB - De Gruyter Open

CY - Berlin

ER -

Ferreira M, Almeida P, Shahbazi M-A, Correia A, A. Santos H. Chapter 3.5 - Current Trends and Developments for Nanotechnology in Cancer (Book Chapter). In Vale N, editor, Biomedical Chemistry : Current Trends and Developments. Berlin: De Gruyter Open. 2015. p. 290–342. Chapter 3.5