Children with specific language impairment in primary health care - tests, assessment, prevalence and home activities

Research output: ThesisDoctoral ThesisCollection of Articles

Abstract

Developmental language disorders in children are common and constitute a common reason for support in both health care and school system. Specific language impairment (SLI) is diagnosed in Finland in accordance with the ICD (International Classification of Diseases) with either F80.1 or F80.2 diagnoses. The terminology related to SLI is not internationally unambiguous. Studies indicate that SLI may entail more extensive difficulties than those related purely to language and, also, that SLI in childhood persists into adulthood. SLI has been studied very little within the Finnish service system. The present study explored SLI in the primary health care of one Finnish town. The children participating in the study belonged to the multidisciplinary SLI in Vantaa study group. SLI in Vantaa consisted of all the Finnish speaking children born in 1998 and 1999 who had been diagnosed with the diagnosis F80.1 or F80.2 in the secondary health care, and their matched controls. The first data set assessed the test use of the speech and language therapists (SLTs). In the second data set, the test performance of the children diagnosed with SLI was compared to that of their matched controls. The third study analysed the prevalence of the diagnosed SLI in the SLTs’ statistics over a period of eleven years. The fourth study compared the home activities of the children with SLI with those of their matched controls. The tests that were considered to be the best in separating the children with SLI from their peers were the same ones that the SLTs had most confidence in and that they most frequently used. On the other hand, the SLTs used some tests to assess also other constructs of language than those for which these tests were originally devised. The prevalence of SLI remained lower than the internationally reported level, even though it did increase during the study period. The low prevalence raised the possibility of under-diagnosing of SLI. When comparing the peer groups in home activities, similarities outnumbered differences. The existing differences seemed to be related to something else than language difficulties. Unifying and developing the assessment procedures of SLI is needed in Finland. Organising the future studies in collaboration between the researchers and the clinicians may benefit the children with language disorders in the best possible way.
Original languageEnglish
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Launonen, Kaisa, Supervisor
  • Kauppila, Timo Ilmari, Supervisor
Place of PublicationHelsinki
Publisher
Print ISBNs978-951-51-4034-0
Electronic ISBNs978-951-51-4035-7
Publication statusPublished - 2018
MoE publication typeG5 Doctoral dissertation (article)

Fields of Science

  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Language Development Disorders
  • +diagnosis
  • +epidemiology
  • +therapy
  • Language Disorders
  • Speech Disorders
  • Child Language
  • Language Development
  • Secondary Care
  • Primary Health Care
  • Parents
  • Speech Therapy
  • Aphasia
  • 6163 Logopedics

Cite this

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title = "Children with specific language impairment in primary health care - tests, assessment, prevalence and home activities",
abstract = "Developmental language disorders in children are common and constitute a common reason for support in both health care and school system. Specific language impairment (SLI) is diagnosed in Finland in accordance with the ICD (International Classification of Diseases) with either F80.1 or F80.2 diagnoses. The terminology related to SLI is not internationally unambiguous. Studies indicate that SLI may entail more extensive difficulties than those related purely to language and, also, that SLI in childhood persists into adulthood. SLI has been studied very little within the Finnish service system. The present study explored SLI in the primary health care of one Finnish town. The children participating in the study belonged to the multidisciplinary SLI in Vantaa study group. SLI in Vantaa consisted of all the Finnish speaking children born in 1998 and 1999 who had been diagnosed with the diagnosis F80.1 or F80.2 in the secondary health care, and their matched controls. The first data set assessed the test use of the speech and language therapists (SLTs). In the second data set, the test performance of the children diagnosed with SLI was compared to that of their matched controls. The third study analysed the prevalence of the diagnosed SLI in the SLTs’ statistics over a period of eleven years. The fourth study compared the home activities of the children with SLI with those of their matched controls. The tests that were considered to be the best in separating the children with SLI from their peers were the same ones that the SLTs had most confidence in and that they most frequently used. On the other hand, the SLTs used some tests to assess also other constructs of language than those for which these tests were originally devised. The prevalence of SLI remained lower than the internationally reported level, even though it did increase during the study period. The low prevalence raised the possibility of under-diagnosing of SLI. When comparing the peer groups in home activities, similarities outnumbered differences. The existing differences seemed to be related to something else than language difficulties. Unifying and developing the assessment procedures of SLI is needed in Finland. Organising the future studies in collaboration between the researchers and the clinicians may benefit the children with language disorders in the best possible way.",
keywords = "Child, Child, Preschool, Language Development Disorders, +diagnosis, +epidemiology, +therapy, Language Disorders, Speech Disorders, Child Language, Language Development, Secondary Care, Primary Health Care, Parents, Speech Therapy, Aphasia, 6163 Logopedics",
author = "Sinikka Hannus",
note = "M1 - 158 s. + liitteet",
year = "2018",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-951-51-4034-0",
publisher = "[S. Hannus]",
address = "Finland",

}

Children with specific language impairment in primary health care - tests, assessment, prevalence and home activities. / Hannus, Sinikka.

Helsinki : [S. Hannus], 2018. 158 p.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral ThesisCollection of Articles

TY - THES

T1 - Children with specific language impairment in primary health care - tests, assessment, prevalence and home activities

AU - Hannus, Sinikka

N1 - M1 - 158 s. + liitteet

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Developmental language disorders in children are common and constitute a common reason for support in both health care and school system. Specific language impairment (SLI) is diagnosed in Finland in accordance with the ICD (International Classification of Diseases) with either F80.1 or F80.2 diagnoses. The terminology related to SLI is not internationally unambiguous. Studies indicate that SLI may entail more extensive difficulties than those related purely to language and, also, that SLI in childhood persists into adulthood. SLI has been studied very little within the Finnish service system. The present study explored SLI in the primary health care of one Finnish town. The children participating in the study belonged to the multidisciplinary SLI in Vantaa study group. SLI in Vantaa consisted of all the Finnish speaking children born in 1998 and 1999 who had been diagnosed with the diagnosis F80.1 or F80.2 in the secondary health care, and their matched controls. The first data set assessed the test use of the speech and language therapists (SLTs). In the second data set, the test performance of the children diagnosed with SLI was compared to that of their matched controls. The third study analysed the prevalence of the diagnosed SLI in the SLTs’ statistics over a period of eleven years. The fourth study compared the home activities of the children with SLI with those of their matched controls. The tests that were considered to be the best in separating the children with SLI from their peers were the same ones that the SLTs had most confidence in and that they most frequently used. On the other hand, the SLTs used some tests to assess also other constructs of language than those for which these tests were originally devised. The prevalence of SLI remained lower than the internationally reported level, even though it did increase during the study period. The low prevalence raised the possibility of under-diagnosing of SLI. When comparing the peer groups in home activities, similarities outnumbered differences. The existing differences seemed to be related to something else than language difficulties. Unifying and developing the assessment procedures of SLI is needed in Finland. Organising the future studies in collaboration between the researchers and the clinicians may benefit the children with language disorders in the best possible way.

AB - Developmental language disorders in children are common and constitute a common reason for support in both health care and school system. Specific language impairment (SLI) is diagnosed in Finland in accordance with the ICD (International Classification of Diseases) with either F80.1 or F80.2 diagnoses. The terminology related to SLI is not internationally unambiguous. Studies indicate that SLI may entail more extensive difficulties than those related purely to language and, also, that SLI in childhood persists into adulthood. SLI has been studied very little within the Finnish service system. The present study explored SLI in the primary health care of one Finnish town. The children participating in the study belonged to the multidisciplinary SLI in Vantaa study group. SLI in Vantaa consisted of all the Finnish speaking children born in 1998 and 1999 who had been diagnosed with the diagnosis F80.1 or F80.2 in the secondary health care, and their matched controls. The first data set assessed the test use of the speech and language therapists (SLTs). In the second data set, the test performance of the children diagnosed with SLI was compared to that of their matched controls. The third study analysed the prevalence of the diagnosed SLI in the SLTs’ statistics over a period of eleven years. The fourth study compared the home activities of the children with SLI with those of their matched controls. The tests that were considered to be the best in separating the children with SLI from their peers were the same ones that the SLTs had most confidence in and that they most frequently used. On the other hand, the SLTs used some tests to assess also other constructs of language than those for which these tests were originally devised. The prevalence of SLI remained lower than the internationally reported level, even though it did increase during the study period. The low prevalence raised the possibility of under-diagnosing of SLI. When comparing the peer groups in home activities, similarities outnumbered differences. The existing differences seemed to be related to something else than language difficulties. Unifying and developing the assessment procedures of SLI is needed in Finland. Organising the future studies in collaboration between the researchers and the clinicians may benefit the children with language disorders in the best possible way.

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KW - Child, Preschool

KW - Language Development Disorders

KW - +diagnosis

KW - +epidemiology

KW - +therapy

KW - Language Disorders

KW - Speech Disorders

KW - Child Language

KW - Language Development

KW - Secondary Care

KW - Primary Health Care

KW - Parents

KW - Speech Therapy

KW - Aphasia

KW - 6163 Logopedics

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

SN - 978-951-51-4034-0

PB - [S. Hannus]

CY - Helsinki

ER -