Children’s self-regulation skills in the Finnish day care environment

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The topic of how children’s self-regulation (SR) skills occur and develop
has attracted researchers for decades. In this article, we focus on the content of
children’s SR skills and their relation to children’s learning, social skills and special
needs in the context of Finnish early childhood education (ECE). The SR skills of 2476
children, aged 13–89 months, were evaluated in day care centres between January
and May 2015. Teachers completed questionnaires assessing children's SR, social,
motor, language and metacognitive skills, as well as the children’s adaptivity in peer
relations and their attachment to ECE personnel. The results relate to previous
studies showing how SR skills are highly related to children’s ability to cope in social
interaction and in terms of gender. The boys’ SR skills were statistically significantly
much weaker than girls’. Good SR skills also correlated positively with children’s
performance in metacognitive and motor skills. Weak SR skills had a strong
connection to the child's qualification as having special needs. Children’s SR skills may
have an important role in helping children to regulate their development
appropriately and to participate in creating a socially shared learning environment.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Early Childhood Education Research
Volume6
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)89-107
Number of pages19
ISSN2323-7414
Publication statusPublished - 31 Aug 2017
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 516 Educational sciences

Cite this

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title = "Children’s self-regulation skills in the Finnish day care environment",
abstract = "The topic of how children’s self-regulation (SR) skills occur and develophas attracted researchers for decades. In this article, we focus on the content ofchildren’s SR skills and their relation to children’s learning, social skills and specialneeds in the context of Finnish early childhood education (ECE). The SR skills of 2476children, aged 13–89 months, were evaluated in day care centres between Januaryand May 2015. Teachers completed questionnaires assessing children's SR, social,motor, language and metacognitive skills, as well as the children’s adaptivity in peerrelations and their attachment to ECE personnel. The results relate to previousstudies showing how SR skills are highly related to children’s ability to cope in socialinteraction and in terms of gender. The boys’ SR skills were statistically significantlymuch weaker than girls’. Good SR skills also correlated positively with children’sperformance in metacognitive and motor skills. Weak SR skills had a strongconnection to the child's qualification as having special needs. Children’s SR skills mayhave an important role in helping children to regulate their developmentappropriately and to participate in creating a socially shared learning environment.",
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author = "Jouni Veijalainen and Jyrki Reunamo and Alisa Alijoki",
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Children’s self-regulation skills in the Finnish day care environment. / Veijalainen, Jouni; Reunamo, Jyrki; Alijoki, Alisa.

In: Journal of Early Childhood Education Research, Vol. 6, No. 1, 31.08.2017, p. 89-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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AU - Alijoki, Alisa

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AB - The topic of how children’s self-regulation (SR) skills occur and develophas attracted researchers for decades. In this article, we focus on the content ofchildren’s SR skills and their relation to children’s learning, social skills and specialneeds in the context of Finnish early childhood education (ECE). The SR skills of 2476children, aged 13–89 months, were evaluated in day care centres between Januaryand May 2015. Teachers completed questionnaires assessing children's SR, social,motor, language and metacognitive skills, as well as the children’s adaptivity in peerrelations and their attachment to ECE personnel. The results relate to previousstudies showing how SR skills are highly related to children’s ability to cope in socialinteraction and in terms of gender. The boys’ SR skills were statistically significantlymuch weaker than girls’. Good SR skills also correlated positively with children’sperformance in metacognitive and motor skills. Weak SR skills had a strongconnection to the child's qualification as having special needs. Children’s SR skills mayhave an important role in helping children to regulate their developmentappropriately and to participate in creating a socially shared learning environment.

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