China and Africa: Economic growth and a non-transformative political elite

Obert Hodzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Prevailing narratives in the discourse on China-Africa engagement are that China is developing Africa. This paper departs from those narratives because they disregard the agency of Africa's political elite. Basing its argument on the nature of the African political elite, the paper analyses their role in determining the impact of China's economic and trade engagement on economic development in their respective countries. To do that, it first discusses the nature and identity of African political elites, and examines how they control their states and scarce resources. Having done that, the paper then analyses their role in determining the nature and extent of development emanating from their countries’ economic engagement with China. It then concludes that it is not how much foreign states invest in African countries that determines Africa's rise, but rather political elites who influence the direction of their states’ development.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Contemporary African Studies
Number of pages16
ISSN0258-9001
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Nov 2017
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 517 Political science
  • China
  • Africa
  • Political Elites
  • Development
  • State

Cite this

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China and Africa: Economic growth and a non-transformative political elite. / Hodzi, Obert.

In: Journal of Contemporary African Studies, 20.11.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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AB - Prevailing narratives in the discourse on China-Africa engagement are that China is developing Africa. This paper departs from those narratives because they disregard the agency of Africa's political elite. Basing its argument on the nature of the African political elite, the paper analyses their role in determining the impact of China's economic and trade engagement on economic development in their respective countries. To do that, it first discusses the nature and identity of African political elites, and examines how they control their states and scarce resources. Having done that, the paper then analyses their role in determining the nature and extent of development emanating from their countries’ economic engagement with China. It then concludes that it is not how much foreign states invest in African countries that determines Africa's rise, but rather political elites who influence the direction of their states’ development.

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KW - Africa

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