Consumer perceptions raised by the food safety inspection report: Does the smiley communicate a food safety risk?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The publication of inspection grades at food establishments has been introduced as a way to inform consumers about restaurants' food safety levels. This two-part study explored consumers' perceptions and behavioural intentions raised by the Finnish food safety inspection report Oiva. The first part of the study explored university students' (n = 98) spontaneous perceptions raised by the inspection grade, communicated with a smiley face. Perceptions related to food safety risk and one's own behaviour were most frequent. In the second part, these perceptions were used in testing the full food safety inspection report on a nationally representative sample of the 18–65 years old Finnish population (n = 1513) with a survey-experiment approach. Binary logistic and linear regressions revealed that lower inspection grades were directly associated with increased perceived food safety risk and a behavioural intention not to eat at the restaurant when the effect of perceived food safety risk was taken into account. Information about the risk type moderated the effect of lower inspection grades on perceived risk and behavioural intention. These results underline the importance of providing additional information to consumers about the type of food safety risk.
Original languageEnglish
JournalFood Control
Volume110
ISSN0956-7135
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2020
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • Food safety
  • Perceived risk
  • Disclosure
  • Inspection
  • Grading scheme
  • Restaurant
  • Mediation
  • 416 Food Science

Cite this

@article{04fe90eb24f541dbb0e906d1428e9675,
title = "Consumer perceptions raised by the food safety inspection report: Does the smiley communicate a food safety risk?",
abstract = "The publication of inspection grades at food establishments has been introduced as a way to inform consumers about restaurants' food safety levels. This two-part study explored consumers' perceptions and behavioural intentions raised by the Finnish food safety inspection report Oiva. The first part of the study explored university students' (n = 98) spontaneous perceptions raised by the inspection grade, communicated with a smiley face. Perceptions related to food safety risk and one's own behaviour were most frequent. In the second part, these perceptions were used in testing the full food safety inspection report on a nationally representative sample of the 18–65 years old Finnish population (n = 1513) with a survey-experiment approach. Binary logistic and linear regressions revealed that lower inspection grades were directly associated with increased perceived food safety risk and a behavioural intention not to eat at the restaurant when the effect of perceived food safety risk was taken into account. Information about the risk type moderated the effect of lower inspection grades on perceived risk and behavioural intention. These results underline the importance of providing additional information to consumers about the type of food safety risk.",
keywords = "Food safety, Perceived risk, Disclosure, Inspection, Grading scheme, Restaurant, Mediation, 416 Food Science",
author = "Annukka Vainio and Jenni Kaskela and Eerika Finell and Sari Ollila and Janne Lund{\'e}n",
year = "2020",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1016/j.foodcont.2019.106976",
language = "English",
volume = "110",
journal = "Food Control",
issn = "0956-7135",
publisher = "ELSEVIER SCI IRELAND LTD",

}

Consumer perceptions raised by the food safety inspection report: Does the smiley communicate a food safety risk? / Vainio, Annukka; Kaskela, Jenni; Finell, Eerika; Ollila, Sari; Lundén, Janne.

In: Food Control, Vol. 110, 04.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Consumer perceptions raised by the food safety inspection report: Does the smiley communicate a food safety risk?

AU - Vainio, Annukka

AU - Kaskela, Jenni

AU - Finell, Eerika

AU - Ollila, Sari

AU - Lundén, Janne

PY - 2020/4

Y1 - 2020/4

N2 - The publication of inspection grades at food establishments has been introduced as a way to inform consumers about restaurants' food safety levels. This two-part study explored consumers' perceptions and behavioural intentions raised by the Finnish food safety inspection report Oiva. The first part of the study explored university students' (n = 98) spontaneous perceptions raised by the inspection grade, communicated with a smiley face. Perceptions related to food safety risk and one's own behaviour were most frequent. In the second part, these perceptions were used in testing the full food safety inspection report on a nationally representative sample of the 18–65 years old Finnish population (n = 1513) with a survey-experiment approach. Binary logistic and linear regressions revealed that lower inspection grades were directly associated with increased perceived food safety risk and a behavioural intention not to eat at the restaurant when the effect of perceived food safety risk was taken into account. Information about the risk type moderated the effect of lower inspection grades on perceived risk and behavioural intention. These results underline the importance of providing additional information to consumers about the type of food safety risk.

AB - The publication of inspection grades at food establishments has been introduced as a way to inform consumers about restaurants' food safety levels. This two-part study explored consumers' perceptions and behavioural intentions raised by the Finnish food safety inspection report Oiva. The first part of the study explored university students' (n = 98) spontaneous perceptions raised by the inspection grade, communicated with a smiley face. Perceptions related to food safety risk and one's own behaviour were most frequent. In the second part, these perceptions were used in testing the full food safety inspection report on a nationally representative sample of the 18–65 years old Finnish population (n = 1513) with a survey-experiment approach. Binary logistic and linear regressions revealed that lower inspection grades were directly associated with increased perceived food safety risk and a behavioural intention not to eat at the restaurant when the effect of perceived food safety risk was taken into account. Information about the risk type moderated the effect of lower inspection grades on perceived risk and behavioural intention. These results underline the importance of providing additional information to consumers about the type of food safety risk.

KW - Food safety

KW - Perceived risk

KW - Disclosure

KW - Inspection

KW - Grading scheme

KW - Restaurant

KW - Mediation

KW - 416 Food Science

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DO - 10.1016/j.foodcont.2019.106976

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JO - Food Control

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