Corneal Epithelial Abrasion with Ocular Burr As a Model for Cornea Wound Healing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The murine cornea provides an excellent model to study wound healing. The cornea is the outermost layer of the eye, and thus is the first defense to injury. In fact, the most common type of eye injury found in clinic is a corneal abrasion. Here, we utilize an ocular burr to induce an abrasion resulting in removal of the corneal epithelium in vivo on anesthetized mice. This method allows for targeted and reproducible epithelial disruption, leaving other areas intact. In addition, we describe the visualization of the abraded epithelium with fluorescein staining and provide concrete advice on how to visualize the abraded cornea. Then, we follow the timeline of wound healing 0, 18, and 72 h after abrasion, until the wound is re-epithelialized. The epithelial abrasion model of corneal injury is ideal for studies on epithelial cell proliferation, migration and re-epithelialization of the corneal layers. However, this method is not optimal to study stromal activation during wound healing, because the ocular burr does not penetrate to the stromal cell layers. This method is also suitable for clinical applications, for example, pre-clinical test of drug effectiveness.
Original languageEnglish
Article number58071
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Volume2018
Issue number137
Number of pages9
ISSN1940-087X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2018
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • Medicine
  • Issue 137
  • Cornea
  • epithelium
  • abrasion
  • ocular burr
  • wound healing
  • fluorescein
  • in vivo
  • mouse
  • DEBRIDEMENT WOUNDS
  • MOUSE MODEL
  • INTEGRIN
  • CELLS
  • EXPRESSION
  • JUNCTIONS
  • EROSIONS
  • REMOVAL
  • MATRIX
  • INJURY
  • 3112 Neurosciences

Cite this

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title = "Corneal Epithelial Abrasion with Ocular Burr As a Model for Cornea Wound Healing",
abstract = "The murine cornea provides an excellent model to study wound healing. The cornea is the outermost layer of the eye, and thus is the first defense to injury. In fact, the most common type of eye injury found in clinic is a corneal abrasion. Here, we utilize an ocular burr to induce an abrasion resulting in removal of the corneal epithelium in vivo on anesthetized mice. This method allows for targeted and reproducible epithelial disruption, leaving other areas intact. In addition, we describe the visualization of the abraded epithelium with fluorescein staining and provide concrete advice on how to visualize the abraded cornea. Then, we follow the timeline of wound healing 0, 18, and 72 h after abrasion, until the wound is re-epithelialized. The epithelial abrasion model of corneal injury is ideal for studies on epithelial cell proliferation, migration and re-epithelialization of the corneal layers. However, this method is not optimal to study stromal activation during wound healing, because the ocular burr does not penetrate to the stromal cell layers. This method is also suitable for clinical applications, for example, pre-clinical test of drug effectiveness.",
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author = "Solja Kalha and Alison Kuony and Frederic Michon",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
doi = "10.3791/58071",
language = "English",
volume = "2018",
journal = "Journal of Visualized Experiments",
issn = "1940-087X",
publisher = "JOURNAL OF VISUALIZED EXPERIMENTS",
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Corneal Epithelial Abrasion with Ocular Burr As a Model for Cornea Wound Healing. / Kalha, Solja; Kuony, Alison; Michon, Frederic.

In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, Vol. 2018, No. 137, 58071, 07.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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N2 - The murine cornea provides an excellent model to study wound healing. The cornea is the outermost layer of the eye, and thus is the first defense to injury. In fact, the most common type of eye injury found in clinic is a corneal abrasion. Here, we utilize an ocular burr to induce an abrasion resulting in removal of the corneal epithelium in vivo on anesthetized mice. This method allows for targeted and reproducible epithelial disruption, leaving other areas intact. In addition, we describe the visualization of the abraded epithelium with fluorescein staining and provide concrete advice on how to visualize the abraded cornea. Then, we follow the timeline of wound healing 0, 18, and 72 h after abrasion, until the wound is re-epithelialized. The epithelial abrasion model of corneal injury is ideal for studies on epithelial cell proliferation, migration and re-epithelialization of the corneal layers. However, this method is not optimal to study stromal activation during wound healing, because the ocular burr does not penetrate to the stromal cell layers. This method is also suitable for clinical applications, for example, pre-clinical test of drug effectiveness.

AB - The murine cornea provides an excellent model to study wound healing. The cornea is the outermost layer of the eye, and thus is the first defense to injury. In fact, the most common type of eye injury found in clinic is a corneal abrasion. Here, we utilize an ocular burr to induce an abrasion resulting in removal of the corneal epithelium in vivo on anesthetized mice. This method allows for targeted and reproducible epithelial disruption, leaving other areas intact. In addition, we describe the visualization of the abraded epithelium with fluorescein staining and provide concrete advice on how to visualize the abraded cornea. Then, we follow the timeline of wound healing 0, 18, and 72 h after abrasion, until the wound is re-epithelialized. The epithelial abrasion model of corneal injury is ideal for studies on epithelial cell proliferation, migration and re-epithelialization of the corneal layers. However, this method is not optimal to study stromal activation during wound healing, because the ocular burr does not penetrate to the stromal cell layers. This method is also suitable for clinical applications, for example, pre-clinical test of drug effectiveness.

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KW - DEBRIDEMENT WOUNDS

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KW - EXPRESSION

KW - JUNCTIONS

KW - EROSIONS

KW - REMOVAL

KW - MATRIX

KW - INJURY

KW - 3112 Neurosciences

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