Cortical auditory event-related potentials in newborn infants

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The possibility of recording changes in electroencephalography potentials following perception of sound was reported several decades ago. The recent expanding research on auditory cortical event-retated potentials (AERPs) for assessing sound discrimination abilities in children and infants has indicated that several methodological issues need to be addressed before it can be implemented in clinical practice. Latencies, polarities, and amplitudes of the responses change with gestational age and during infancy. Thus, the maturation of the infant must be considered when designing stimulus paradigms and interpreting the responses. Of healthy newborn infants, only about 80% will show mismatch negativity, the automatic change detection of the auditory stimuli. Currently, the AERP method cannot be applied in clinical practice in the neonatal period, although the findings in healthy newborns at risk for dyslexia are promising. Further research will elucidate the possibility of developing AERPs as a possible early screening method during infancy for later dyslexia or cognitive dysfunction. (c) 2006 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
JournalSeminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
Volume11
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)452-458
Number of pages7
ISSN1744-165X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 515 Psychology

Cite this

@article{9fc3a40c7c9e4fbd93de2c9497803ea8,
title = "Cortical auditory event-related potentials in newborn infants",
abstract = "The possibility of recording changes in electroencephalography potentials following perception of sound was reported several decades ago. The recent expanding research on auditory cortical event-retated potentials (AERPs) for assessing sound discrimination abilities in children and infants has indicated that several methodological issues need to be addressed before it can be implemented in clinical practice. Latencies, polarities, and amplitudes of the responses change with gestational age and during infancy. Thus, the maturation of the infant must be considered when designing stimulus paradigms and interpreting the responses. Of healthy newborn infants, only about 80{\%} will show mismatch negativity, the automatic change detection of the auditory stimuli. Currently, the AERP method cannot be applied in clinical practice in the neonatal period, although the findings in healthy newborns at risk for dyslexia are promising. Further research will elucidate the possibility of developing AERPs as a possible early screening method during infancy for later dyslexia or cognitive dysfunction. (c) 2006 Published by Elsevier Ltd.",
keywords = "515 Psychology",
author = "Vineta Fellman and Minna Huotilainen",
year = "2006",
doi = "10.1016/j.siny.2006.07.004",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "452--458",
journal = "Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine",
issn = "1744-165X",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders",
number = "6",

}

Cortical auditory event-related potentials in newborn infants. / Fellman, Vineta; Huotilainen, Minna.

In: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine, Vol. 11, No. 6, 2006, p. 452-458.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cortical auditory event-related potentials in newborn infants

AU - Fellman, Vineta

AU - Huotilainen, Minna

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - The possibility of recording changes in electroencephalography potentials following perception of sound was reported several decades ago. The recent expanding research on auditory cortical event-retated potentials (AERPs) for assessing sound discrimination abilities in children and infants has indicated that several methodological issues need to be addressed before it can be implemented in clinical practice. Latencies, polarities, and amplitudes of the responses change with gestational age and during infancy. Thus, the maturation of the infant must be considered when designing stimulus paradigms and interpreting the responses. Of healthy newborn infants, only about 80% will show mismatch negativity, the automatic change detection of the auditory stimuli. Currently, the AERP method cannot be applied in clinical practice in the neonatal period, although the findings in healthy newborns at risk for dyslexia are promising. Further research will elucidate the possibility of developing AERPs as a possible early screening method during infancy for later dyslexia or cognitive dysfunction. (c) 2006 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

AB - The possibility of recording changes in electroencephalography potentials following perception of sound was reported several decades ago. The recent expanding research on auditory cortical event-retated potentials (AERPs) for assessing sound discrimination abilities in children and infants has indicated that several methodological issues need to be addressed before it can be implemented in clinical practice. Latencies, polarities, and amplitudes of the responses change with gestational age and during infancy. Thus, the maturation of the infant must be considered when designing stimulus paradigms and interpreting the responses. Of healthy newborn infants, only about 80% will show mismatch negativity, the automatic change detection of the auditory stimuli. Currently, the AERP method cannot be applied in clinical practice in the neonatal period, although the findings in healthy newborns at risk for dyslexia are promising. Further research will elucidate the possibility of developing AERPs as a possible early screening method during infancy for later dyslexia or cognitive dysfunction. (c) 2006 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

KW - 515 Psychology

U2 - 10.1016/j.siny.2006.07.004

DO - 10.1016/j.siny.2006.07.004

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 452

EP - 458

JO - Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine

JF - Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine

SN - 1744-165X

IS - 6

ER -