Coupling biogeochemical process rates and metagenomic blueprints of coastal bacterial assemblages in the context of environmental change

Trine Markussen, Elisabeth M. Happel, Jonna Emilia Teikari, Vimala Huchaiah, Johannes Alneberg, Anders F. Andersson, Anna Kaarina Sivonen, Lasee Riemann, Mathias Middelboe, Veljo Kisand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Bacteria are major drivers of biogeochemical nutrient
cycles and energy fluxes in marine environments,
yet how bacterial communities respond to environ-
mental change is not well known. Metagenomes allow
examination of genetic responses of the entire micro-
bial community to environmental change. However, it
is challenging to link metagenomes directly to bio-
geochemical process rates. Here, we investigate
metagenomic responses in natural bacterioplankton
communities to simulated environmental stressors in
the Baltic Sea, including increased river water input,
increased nutrient concentration, and reduced oxy-
gen level. This allowed us to identify informative pro-
karyotic gene markers, responding to environmental
perturbation. Our results demonstrate that metage-
nomic and metabolic changes in bacterial communi-
ties in response to environmental stressors are
influenced both by the initial community composition
and by the biogeochemical factors shaping the func-
tional response. Furthermore, the different sources of
dissolved organic matter (DOM) had the largest
impact on metagenomic blueprint. Most prominently,
changes in DOM loads influenced specific trans-
porter types reflecting the substrate availability and
DOC assimilation and consumption pathways. The
results provide new knowledge for developing
models of ecosystem structure and biogeochemical
cycling in future climate change scenarios and
advance our exploration of the potential use of
marine microorganisms as markers for environmen-
tal conditions.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEnvironmental Microbiology
Volume20
Issue number8
Pages (from-to)3083-3099
Number of pages17
ISSN1462-2912
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2018
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • CENTRAL BALTIC SEA
  • DISSOLVED ORGANIC-MATTER
  • DYNAMICS
  • GENE-EXPRESSION
  • GENOME
  • MARINE BACTERIOPLANKTON
  • METABOLIC PATHWAYS
  • MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES
  • TRAP TRANSPORTERS
  • VIRAL LYSIS
  • 1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology

Cite this

Markussen, T., Happel, E. M., Teikari, J. E., Huchaiah, V., Alneberg, J., Andersson, A. F., ... Kisand, V. (2018). Coupling biogeochemical process rates and metagenomic blueprints of coastal bacterial assemblages in the context of environmental change. Environmental Microbiology, 20(8), 3083-3099. https://doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.14371
Markussen, Trine ; Happel, Elisabeth M. ; Teikari, Jonna Emilia ; Huchaiah, Vimala ; Alneberg, Johannes ; Andersson, Anders F. ; Sivonen, Anna Kaarina ; Riemann, Lasee ; Middelboe, Mathias ; Kisand, Veljo. / Coupling biogeochemical process rates and metagenomic blueprints of coastal bacterial assemblages in the context of environmental change. In: Environmental Microbiology. 2018 ; Vol. 20, No. 8. pp. 3083-3099.
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title = "Coupling biogeochemical process rates and metagenomic blueprints of coastal bacterial assemblages in the context of environmental change",
abstract = "Bacteria are major drivers of biogeochemical nutrientcycles and energy fluxes in marine environments,yet how bacterial communities respond to environ-mental change is not well known. Metagenomes allowexamination of genetic responses of the entire micro-bial community to environmental change. However, itis challenging to link metagenomes directly to bio-geochemical process rates. Here, we investigatemetagenomic responses in natural bacterioplanktoncommunities to simulated environmental stressors inthe Baltic Sea, including increased river water input,increased nutrient concentration, and reduced oxy-gen level. This allowed us to identify informative pro-karyotic gene markers, responding to environmentalperturbation. Our results demonstrate that metage-nomic and metabolic changes in bacterial communi-ties in response to environmental stressors areinfluenced both by the initial community compositionand by the biogeochemical factors shaping the func-tional response. Furthermore, the different sources ofdissolved organic matter (DOM) had the largestimpact on metagenomic blueprint. Most prominently,changes in DOM loads influenced specific trans-porter types reflecting the substrate availability andDOC assimilation and consumption pathways. Theresults provide new knowledge for developingmodels of ecosystem structure and biogeochemicalcycling in future climate change scenarios andadvance our exploration of the potential use ofmarine microorganisms as markers for environmen-tal conditions.",
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author = "Trine Markussen and Happel, {Elisabeth M.} and Teikari, {Jonna Emilia} and Vimala Huchaiah and Johannes Alneberg and Andersson, {Anders F.} and Sivonen, {Anna Kaarina} and Lasee Riemann and Mathias Middelboe and Veljo Kisand",
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doi = "10.1111/1462-2920.14371",
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Markussen, T, Happel, EM, Teikari, JE, Huchaiah, V, Alneberg, J, Andersson, AF, Sivonen, AK, Riemann, L, Middelboe, M & Kisand, V 2018, 'Coupling biogeochemical process rates and metagenomic blueprints of coastal bacterial assemblages in the context of environmental change' Environmental Microbiology, vol. 20, no. 8, pp. 3083-3099. https://doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.14371

Coupling biogeochemical process rates and metagenomic blueprints of coastal bacterial assemblages in the context of environmental change. / Markussen, Trine; Happel, Elisabeth M.; Teikari, Jonna Emilia; Huchaiah, Vimala; Alneberg, Johannes; Andersson, Anders F. ; Sivonen, Anna Kaarina; Riemann, Lasee; Middelboe, Mathias; Kisand, Veljo.

In: Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 20, No. 8, 01.08.2018, p. 3083-3099.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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T1 - Coupling biogeochemical process rates and metagenomic blueprints of coastal bacterial assemblages in the context of environmental change

AU - Markussen, Trine

AU - Happel, Elisabeth M.

AU - Teikari, Jonna Emilia

AU - Huchaiah, Vimala

AU - Alneberg, Johannes

AU - Andersson, Anders F.

AU - Sivonen, Anna Kaarina

AU - Riemann, Lasee

AU - Middelboe, Mathias

AU - Kisand, Veljo

PY - 2018/8/1

Y1 - 2018/8/1

N2 - Bacteria are major drivers of biogeochemical nutrientcycles and energy fluxes in marine environments,yet how bacterial communities respond to environ-mental change is not well known. Metagenomes allowexamination of genetic responses of the entire micro-bial community to environmental change. However, itis challenging to link metagenomes directly to bio-geochemical process rates. Here, we investigatemetagenomic responses in natural bacterioplanktoncommunities to simulated environmental stressors inthe Baltic Sea, including increased river water input,increased nutrient concentration, and reduced oxy-gen level. This allowed us to identify informative pro-karyotic gene markers, responding to environmentalperturbation. Our results demonstrate that metage-nomic and metabolic changes in bacterial communi-ties in response to environmental stressors areinfluenced both by the initial community compositionand by the biogeochemical factors shaping the func-tional response. Furthermore, the different sources ofdissolved organic matter (DOM) had the largestimpact on metagenomic blueprint. Most prominently,changes in DOM loads influenced specific trans-porter types reflecting the substrate availability andDOC assimilation and consumption pathways. Theresults provide new knowledge for developingmodels of ecosystem structure and biogeochemicalcycling in future climate change scenarios andadvance our exploration of the potential use ofmarine microorganisms as markers for environmen-tal conditions.

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KW - CENTRAL BALTIC SEA

KW - DISSOLVED ORGANIC-MATTER

KW - DYNAMICS

KW - GENE-EXPRESSION

KW - GENOME

KW - MARINE BACTERIOPLANKTON

KW - METABOLIC PATHWAYS

KW - MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

KW - TRAP TRANSPORTERS

KW - VIRAL LYSIS

KW - 1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology

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DO - 10.1111/1462-2920.14371

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JF - Environmental Microbiology

SN - 1462-2912

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