Abstract

Title: Cultured meat and changing rural areas Niko Räty, Hanna Tuomisto & Toni Ryynänen University of Helsinki Corresponding: niko.raty@helsinki.fi Global population growth, climate change and current livestock production creates “wicked problems” (Rittel & Webber, 1973) that change the food production systems. Novel food production technologies like cellular agriculture, where agricultural products are manufactured utilizing cell culturing techniques are essential in trying to solve these problems (Tuomisto & Teixeira de Mattos, 2011). These novel solutions, like cultured meat, challenge farmers to evaluate the possibilities and challenges they offer. An objective of this abstract is to study what kind of changes these novel technologies would bring to the rural areas (Cor van der Weele & Tramper, 2014). A research about the impact of cultured meat on rural areas practically is non‐existent. We aim at building a future scenario to understand possible changes. The future food production technologies are based on moral and ethical values that have not been collectively defined. What is the function of the farm animals in our food production if the cellular agriculture replaces animals? Cellular agriculture is free from restricting factors like, growing seasons, production is not place‐bound, and it could improve the environmental sustainability and the overall resilience of the future food system. Furthermore, to support this development the traditional and novel food production methods could utilize an advanced symbiotic relationship: solutions that combine farming, clean energy production and cellular agriculture (Tuomisto, 2018). Change in the food systems has influence on the economics by creating new jobs in cell line management, production, and infrastructure, which will have regional impacts on rural areas. The essential question is how to prepare the food production system for changes that cultured meat brings? What are the requirements for the farmers of the future and how these novel technologies will impact to the regional change in societal, regional and local levels? References Cor van der Weele, C., & Tramper, J. (2014). Cultured meat: every village its own factory? Trends in Biotechnology, 32(6), 294–296. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tibtech.2014.04.009 Rittel, H. W. J., & Webber, M. M. (1973). Dilemmas in a General Theory of Planning. Policy Sciences, 4(2), 155– 169. Tuomisto, H. (2018, October 16). Life cycle assessment of cellular agriculture combined with agroecological symbiosis. Presented at the International Conference on Life Cycle Assessment of Food, Bangkok, Thailand. Tuomisto, H. L., & Teixeira de Mattos, M. J. (2011). Environmental Impacts of Cultured Meat Production. Environmental Science & Technology, 45(14), 6117–6123. https://doi.org/10.1021/es200130uI
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 6 Oct 2019
MoE publication typeNot Eligible
Event5th International Scientific Conference on Cultured Meat - Crowne Plaza, Maastricht, Netherlands
Duration: 6 Oct 20198 Oct 2019
Conference number: 5
https://www.culturedmeatconference.com/

Conference

Conference5th International Scientific Conference on Cultured Meat
CountryNetherlands
CityMaastricht
Period06/10/201908/10/2019
Internet address

Fields of Science

  • 511 Economics
  • cultured meat
  • invitro meat
  • clean meat
  • cellular agriculture
  • solumaatalous
  • viljelty liha
  • sustainable food systems
  • cell based meat
  • cultivated meat

Cite this

Räty, N. S., Ryynänen, T., & Tuomisto, H. (2019). CULTURED MEAT AND CHANGING RURAL AREAS. Poster session presented at 5th International Scientific Conference on Cultured Meat, Maastricht, Netherlands.
Räty, Niko Santeri ; Ryynänen, Toni ; Tuomisto, Hanna. / CULTURED MEAT AND CHANGING RURAL AREAS. Poster session presented at 5th International Scientific Conference on Cultured Meat, Maastricht, Netherlands.
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note = "null ; Conference date: 06-10-2019 Through 08-10-2019",
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Räty, NS, Ryynänen, T & Tuomisto, H 2019, 'CULTURED MEAT AND CHANGING RURAL AREAS', 5th International Scientific Conference on Cultured Meat, Maastricht, Netherlands, 06/10/2019 - 08/10/2019.

CULTURED MEAT AND CHANGING RURAL AREAS. / Räty, Niko Santeri; Ryynänen, Toni; Tuomisto, Hanna.

2019. Poster session presented at 5th International Scientific Conference on Cultured Meat, Maastricht, Netherlands.

Research output: Conference materialsPoster

TY - CONF

T1 - CULTURED MEAT AND CHANGING RURAL AREAS

AU - Räty, Niko Santeri

AU - Ryynänen, Toni

AU - Tuomisto, Hanna

PY - 2019/10/6

Y1 - 2019/10/6

N2 - Title: Cultured meat and changing rural areas Niko Räty, Hanna Tuomisto & Toni Ryynänen University of Helsinki Corresponding: niko.raty@helsinki.fi Global population growth, climate change and current livestock production creates “wicked problems” (Rittel & Webber, 1973) that change the food production systems. Novel food production technologies like cellular agriculture, where agricultural products are manufactured utilizing cell culturing techniques are essential in trying to solve these problems (Tuomisto & Teixeira de Mattos, 2011). These novel solutions, like cultured meat, challenge farmers to evaluate the possibilities and challenges they offer. An objective of this abstract is to study what kind of changes these novel technologies would bring to the rural areas (Cor van der Weele & Tramper, 2014). A research about the impact of cultured meat on rural areas practically is non‐existent. We aim at building a future scenario to understand possible changes. The future food production technologies are based on moral and ethical values that have not been collectively defined. What is the function of the farm animals in our food production if the cellular agriculture replaces animals? Cellular agriculture is free from restricting factors like, growing seasons, production is not place‐bound, and it could improve the environmental sustainability and the overall resilience of the future food system. Furthermore, to support this development the traditional and novel food production methods could utilize an advanced symbiotic relationship: solutions that combine farming, clean energy production and cellular agriculture (Tuomisto, 2018). Change in the food systems has influence on the economics by creating new jobs in cell line management, production, and infrastructure, which will have regional impacts on rural areas. The essential question is how to prepare the food production system for changes that cultured meat brings? What are the requirements for the farmers of the future and how these novel technologies will impact to the regional change in societal, regional and local levels? References Cor van der Weele, C., & Tramper, J. (2014). Cultured meat: every village its own factory? Trends in Biotechnology, 32(6), 294–296. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tibtech.2014.04.009 Rittel, H. W. J., & Webber, M. M. (1973). Dilemmas in a General Theory of Planning. Policy Sciences, 4(2), 155– 169. Tuomisto, H. (2018, October 16). Life cycle assessment of cellular agriculture combined with agroecological symbiosis. Presented at the International Conference on Life Cycle Assessment of Food, Bangkok, Thailand. Tuomisto, H. L., & Teixeira de Mattos, M. J. (2011). Environmental Impacts of Cultured Meat Production. Environmental Science & Technology, 45(14), 6117–6123. https://doi.org/10.1021/es200130uI

AB - Title: Cultured meat and changing rural areas Niko Räty, Hanna Tuomisto & Toni Ryynänen University of Helsinki Corresponding: niko.raty@helsinki.fi Global population growth, climate change and current livestock production creates “wicked problems” (Rittel & Webber, 1973) that change the food production systems. Novel food production technologies like cellular agriculture, where agricultural products are manufactured utilizing cell culturing techniques are essential in trying to solve these problems (Tuomisto & Teixeira de Mattos, 2011). These novel solutions, like cultured meat, challenge farmers to evaluate the possibilities and challenges they offer. An objective of this abstract is to study what kind of changes these novel technologies would bring to the rural areas (Cor van der Weele & Tramper, 2014). A research about the impact of cultured meat on rural areas practically is non‐existent. We aim at building a future scenario to understand possible changes. The future food production technologies are based on moral and ethical values that have not been collectively defined. What is the function of the farm animals in our food production if the cellular agriculture replaces animals? Cellular agriculture is free from restricting factors like, growing seasons, production is not place‐bound, and it could improve the environmental sustainability and the overall resilience of the future food system. Furthermore, to support this development the traditional and novel food production methods could utilize an advanced symbiotic relationship: solutions that combine farming, clean energy production and cellular agriculture (Tuomisto, 2018). Change in the food systems has influence on the economics by creating new jobs in cell line management, production, and infrastructure, which will have regional impacts on rural areas. The essential question is how to prepare the food production system for changes that cultured meat brings? What are the requirements for the farmers of the future and how these novel technologies will impact to the regional change in societal, regional and local levels? References Cor van der Weele, C., & Tramper, J. (2014). Cultured meat: every village its own factory? Trends in Biotechnology, 32(6), 294–296. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tibtech.2014.04.009 Rittel, H. W. J., & Webber, M. M. (1973). Dilemmas in a General Theory of Planning. Policy Sciences, 4(2), 155– 169. Tuomisto, H. (2018, October 16). Life cycle assessment of cellular agriculture combined with agroecological symbiosis. Presented at the International Conference on Life Cycle Assessment of Food, Bangkok, Thailand. Tuomisto, H. L., & Teixeira de Mattos, M. J. (2011). Environmental Impacts of Cultured Meat Production. Environmental Science & Technology, 45(14), 6117–6123. https://doi.org/10.1021/es200130uI

KW - 511 Economics

KW - cultured meat

KW - invitro meat

KW - clean meat

KW - cellular agriculture

KW - solumaatalous

KW - viljelty liha

KW - sustainable food systems

KW - cell based meat

KW - cultivated meat

M3 - Poster

ER -

Räty NS, Ryynänen T, Tuomisto H. CULTURED MEAT AND CHANGING RURAL AREAS. 2019. Poster session presented at 5th International Scientific Conference on Cultured Meat, Maastricht, Netherlands.