Development of Multistaged Nanoparticles as Cancer Vaccines

Research output: Conference materialsAbstractResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Nanoparticles present suitable characteristics for use as vaccine adjuvants due to their size, the natural target in the lymph nodes, the possibility to co-deliver antigens and adjuvants, as well as the intrinsic adjuvant effect shown by some nanomaterials.1-3 We propose a multistaged cancer nanovaccine made of an adjuvant nanoparticle and an innovative source of neoantigens, vesicles derived from the membrane of cancer cells, coating the nanoparticles. The adjuvant nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation in a glass capillary microfluidic device from porous silicon nanoparticles and acetalated dextran. The nanovectors were highly cytocompatible for peripheral blood monocytes (PBMC) isolated from healthy donors and immortalized cell lines. Moreover, they induced the expression of co-stimulatory signals (CD80 and 86), the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ), and inhibited, when incubated with the activated PBMCs, the proliferation of cancer cells of the same cell line used as source of membranes. Overall, the developed system showed excellent properties as adjuvant in vitro, with promising future applications in personalized treatments for cancer immunotherapy.

References

1. D. J. Irvine, M. C. Hanson, K. Rakhra and T. Tokatlian, Chem rev, 2015, 115, 11109-11146.
2. F. Fontana, D. Liu, J. Hirvonen and H. A. Santos, Wiley Interdiscip Rev Nanomed Nanobiotechnol, 2016, DOI: 10.1002/wnan.1421.
3. K. T. Gause, A. K. Wheatley, J. Cui, Y. Yan, S. J. Kent and F. Caruso, ACS Nano, 2017, 11, 54-68.

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2017
EventInternational School of Nanomedicine: New Trends in Nanomedicine - Ettore Majorana Foundation And Center for Scientific Culture, Erice, Italy
Duration: 8 Apr 201713 Apr 2017
http://nanomib.wixsite.com/nanomedicineschool/2017

Course

CourseInternational School of Nanomedicine
CountryItaly
CityErice
Period08/04/201713/04/2017
Internet address

Fields of Science

  • 317 Pharmacy
  • Nanotechnology
  • Nanovaccine
  • Immunotherapy
  • Cancer

Cite this

Fontana, F., Shahbazi, M-A., Liu, D., Zhang, H., Mäkilä, E., Salonen, J., ... Almeida Santos, H. (2017). Development of Multistaged Nanoparticles as Cancer Vaccines. Abstract from International School of Nanomedicine, Erice, Italy.
Fontana, Flavia ; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali ; Liu, Dongfei ; Zhang, Hongbo ; Mäkilä, Ermei ; Salonen, Jarno ; Hirvonen, Jouni Tapio ; Almeida Santos, Helder. / Development of Multistaged Nanoparticles as Cancer Vaccines. Abstract from International School of Nanomedicine, Erice, Italy.
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abstract = "Nanoparticles present suitable characteristics for use as vaccine adjuvants due to their size, the natural target in the lymph nodes, the possibility to co-deliver antigens and adjuvants, as well as the intrinsic adjuvant effect shown by some nanomaterials.1-3 We propose a multistaged cancer nanovaccine made of an adjuvant nanoparticle and an innovative source of neoantigens, vesicles derived from the membrane of cancer cells, coating the nanoparticles. The adjuvant nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation in a glass capillary microfluidic device from porous silicon nanoparticles and acetalated dextran. The nanovectors were highly cytocompatible for peripheral blood monocytes (PBMC) isolated from healthy donors and immortalized cell lines. Moreover, they induced the expression of co-stimulatory signals (CD80 and 86), the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ), and inhibited, when incubated with the activated PBMCs, the proliferation of cancer cells of the same cell line used as source of membranes. Overall, the developed system showed excellent properties as adjuvant in vitro, with promising future applications in personalized treatments for cancer immunotherapy.References1. D. J. Irvine, M. C. Hanson, K. Rakhra and T. Tokatlian, Chem rev, 2015, 115, 11109-11146.2. F. Fontana, D. Liu, J. Hirvonen and H. A. Santos, Wiley Interdiscip Rev Nanomed Nanobiotechnol, 2016, DOI: 10.1002/wnan.1421.3. K. T. Gause, A. K. Wheatley, J. Cui, Y. Yan, S. J. Kent and F. Caruso, ACS Nano, 2017, 11, 54-68.",
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author = "Flavia Fontana and Mohammad-Ali Shahbazi and Dongfei Liu and Hongbo Zhang and Ermei M{\"a}kil{\"a} and Jarno Salonen and Hirvonen, {Jouni Tapio} and {Almeida Santos}, Helder",
year = "2017",
language = "English",
note = "International School of Nanomedicine : New Trends in Nanomedicine ; Conference date: 08-04-2017 Through 13-04-2017",
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Fontana, F, Shahbazi, M-A, Liu, D, Zhang, H, Mäkilä, E, Salonen, J, Hirvonen, JT & Almeida Santos, H 2017, 'Development of Multistaged Nanoparticles as Cancer Vaccines' International School of Nanomedicine, Erice, Italy, 08/04/2017 - 13/04/2017, .

Development of Multistaged Nanoparticles as Cancer Vaccines. / Fontana, Flavia; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Liu, Dongfei; Zhang, Hongbo; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno ; Hirvonen, Jouni Tapio; Almeida Santos, Helder.

2017. Abstract from International School of Nanomedicine, Erice, Italy.

Research output: Conference materialsAbstractResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Development of Multistaged Nanoparticles as Cancer Vaccines

AU - Fontana, Flavia

AU - Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali

AU - Liu, Dongfei

AU - Zhang, Hongbo

AU - Mäkilä, Ermei

AU - Salonen, Jarno

AU - Hirvonen, Jouni Tapio

AU - Almeida Santos, Helder

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Nanoparticles present suitable characteristics for use as vaccine adjuvants due to their size, the natural target in the lymph nodes, the possibility to co-deliver antigens and adjuvants, as well as the intrinsic adjuvant effect shown by some nanomaterials.1-3 We propose a multistaged cancer nanovaccine made of an adjuvant nanoparticle and an innovative source of neoantigens, vesicles derived from the membrane of cancer cells, coating the nanoparticles. The adjuvant nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation in a glass capillary microfluidic device from porous silicon nanoparticles and acetalated dextran. The nanovectors were highly cytocompatible for peripheral blood monocytes (PBMC) isolated from healthy donors and immortalized cell lines. Moreover, they induced the expression of co-stimulatory signals (CD80 and 86), the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ), and inhibited, when incubated with the activated PBMCs, the proliferation of cancer cells of the same cell line used as source of membranes. Overall, the developed system showed excellent properties as adjuvant in vitro, with promising future applications in personalized treatments for cancer immunotherapy.References1. D. J. Irvine, M. C. Hanson, K. Rakhra and T. Tokatlian, Chem rev, 2015, 115, 11109-11146.2. F. Fontana, D. Liu, J. Hirvonen and H. A. Santos, Wiley Interdiscip Rev Nanomed Nanobiotechnol, 2016, DOI: 10.1002/wnan.1421.3. K. T. Gause, A. K. Wheatley, J. Cui, Y. Yan, S. J. Kent and F. Caruso, ACS Nano, 2017, 11, 54-68.

AB - Nanoparticles present suitable characteristics for use as vaccine adjuvants due to their size, the natural target in the lymph nodes, the possibility to co-deliver antigens and adjuvants, as well as the intrinsic adjuvant effect shown by some nanomaterials.1-3 We propose a multistaged cancer nanovaccine made of an adjuvant nanoparticle and an innovative source of neoantigens, vesicles derived from the membrane of cancer cells, coating the nanoparticles. The adjuvant nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation in a glass capillary microfluidic device from porous silicon nanoparticles and acetalated dextran. The nanovectors were highly cytocompatible for peripheral blood monocytes (PBMC) isolated from healthy donors and immortalized cell lines. Moreover, they induced the expression of co-stimulatory signals (CD80 and 86), the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ), and inhibited, when incubated with the activated PBMCs, the proliferation of cancer cells of the same cell line used as source of membranes. Overall, the developed system showed excellent properties as adjuvant in vitro, with promising future applications in personalized treatments for cancer immunotherapy.References1. D. J. Irvine, M. C. Hanson, K. Rakhra and T. Tokatlian, Chem rev, 2015, 115, 11109-11146.2. F. Fontana, D. Liu, J. Hirvonen and H. A. Santos, Wiley Interdiscip Rev Nanomed Nanobiotechnol, 2016, DOI: 10.1002/wnan.1421.3. K. T. Gause, A. K. Wheatley, J. Cui, Y. Yan, S. J. Kent and F. Caruso, ACS Nano, 2017, 11, 54-68.

KW - 317 Pharmacy

KW - Nanotechnology

KW - Nanovaccine

KW - Immunotherapy

KW - Cancer

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Fontana F, Shahbazi M-A, Liu D, Zhang H, Mäkilä E, Salonen J et al. Development of Multistaged Nanoparticles as Cancer Vaccines. 2017. Abstract from International School of Nanomedicine, Erice, Italy.