Effects of extrusion process variables on the physical properties of oat containing extrudates

Research output: ThesisMaster's thesisTheses

Abstract

Oats are a good source of protein and dietary fibre, especially β-glucan. Due to the health benefits of β-glucan, oats have gained popularity in snack food formulations. The literature review deals with oats and its components, removal of lipids and fractionation of oat products. The particular emphasis of the literature review was given to studies on the effects of different oat fractions and extrusion process variables on the properties of oat-containing extrudates. The aim of this study was to find out how different oat fractions and extrusion process variables (screw speed, water content and feed rate) affect the physical and chemical properties of the extrudates. The measured physical properties were expansion, hardness and water content.
Extrusion trials were carried out by using defatted oat endosperm flour (EF) as the main ingredient. Whole grain oat flour (WF) was used as a reference. To improve the nutritional quality, defatted oat protein concentrate (PC) and defatted oat bran concentrate (OBC) were added to EF. The oat fractions were defatted by supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2). Pregelatinised corn starch (CS) and waxy corn starch (WS) were added in some trials to increase the expansion of the extrudates. A co-rotating twin-screw extruder was used for the extrusion. Different process variables were: water content of the mass (16, 18 and 20%), screw speed (240, 370 and 500 rpm) and feed rate (68, 76 and 84 g/min). The temperature profile of the extruder barrel was held constant in all of the trials: 40, 70, 70, 100, 110, 130 and 130 °C (sections 1–6 and die).
Screw speed had significant effect on the expansion and hardness. Expansion increased and hardness decreased with increasing screw speed. Water content of the mass affected all the response variables in WF extrudates and all but not hardness and torque in EF extrudates. Increased water content of mass decreased the expansion and hardness in WF extrudates. Feed rate did not have significant effect on the physical properties. When using EF, more expanded and less hard extrudates compared to the WF were obtained. Addition of PC or OBC (10%) decreased the expansion and increased the hardness. Mixing of EF with corn starch (CS or WS; 30%) gave less hard and more expanded extrudates compared to pure EF. The highest expansion was achieved by the addition of WS. Even addition of OBC (20%) in a presence of WS (30%) gave highly expanded and less hard extrudates with high β-glucan content 7.4% (dry weight). Decreasing the particle size of OBC (by ultra-fine milling) or the molecular weight of β-glucan (by enzymatic hydrolysis) did not affect the physical properties of the extrudates even though small decrease in hardness was observed in the trial with enzyme-hydrolysed OBC. The results showed that defatted oat fractions can successfully be used in extrusion when mixed with corn starch. Screw speed had the most profound effect on the physical properties of the oat-containing extrudates followed by the water content of mass.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationHelsinki
Publication statusPublished - 15 May 2012
MoE publication typeG2 Master's thesis, polytechnic Master's thesis

Fields of Science

  • 416 Food Science

Cite this

@phdthesis{605be034ffb845929c67933d3989dab6,
title = "Effects of extrusion process variables on the physical properties of oat containing extrudates",
abstract = "Oats are a good source of protein and dietary fibre, especially β-glucan. Due to the health benefits of β-glucan, oats have gained popularity in snack food formulations. The literature review deals with oats and its components, removal of lipids and fractionation of oat products. The particular emphasis of the literature review was given to studies on the effects of different oat fractions and extrusion process variables on the properties of oat-containing extrudates. The aim of this study was to find out how different oat fractions and extrusion process variables (screw speed, water content and feed rate) affect the physical and chemical properties of the extrudates. The measured physical properties were expansion, hardness and water content.Extrusion trials were carried out by using defatted oat endosperm flour (EF) as the main ingredient. Whole grain oat flour (WF) was used as a reference. To improve the nutritional quality, defatted oat protein concentrate (PC) and defatted oat bran concentrate (OBC) were added to EF. The oat fractions were defatted by supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2). Pregelatinised corn starch (CS) and waxy corn starch (WS) were added in some trials to increase the expansion of the extrudates. A co-rotating twin-screw extruder was used for the extrusion. Different process variables were: water content of the mass (16, 18 and 20{\%}), screw speed (240, 370 and 500 rpm) and feed rate (68, 76 and 84 g/min). The temperature profile of the extruder barrel was held constant in all of the trials: 40, 70, 70, 100, 110, 130 and 130 °C (sections 1–6 and die).Screw speed had significant effect on the expansion and hardness. Expansion increased and hardness decreased with increasing screw speed. Water content of the mass affected all the response variables in WF extrudates and all but not hardness and torque in EF extrudates. Increased water content of mass decreased the expansion and hardness in WF extrudates. Feed rate did not have significant effect on the physical properties. When using EF, more expanded and less hard extrudates compared to the WF were obtained. Addition of PC or OBC (10{\%}) decreased the expansion and increased the hardness. Mixing of EF with corn starch (CS or WS; 30{\%}) gave less hard and more expanded extrudates compared to pure EF. The highest expansion was achieved by the addition of WS. Even addition of OBC (20{\%}) in a presence of WS (30{\%}) gave highly expanded and less hard extrudates with high β-glucan content 7.4{\%} (dry weight). Decreasing the particle size of OBC (by ultra-fine milling) or the molecular weight of β-glucan (by enzymatic hydrolysis) did not affect the physical properties of the extrudates even though small decrease in hardness was observed in the trial with enzyme-hydrolysed OBC. The results showed that defatted oat fractions can successfully be used in extrusion when mixed with corn starch. Screw speed had the most profound effect on the physical properties of the oat-containing extrudates followed by the water content of mass.",
keywords = "416 Food Science",
author = "Alam, {Syed Ariful}",
year = "2012",
month = "5",
day = "15",
language = "English",
series = "EKT Series",
publisher = "Department of Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki",
number = "1548",

}

Effects of extrusion process variables on the physical properties of oat containing extrudates. / Alam, Syed Ariful.

Helsinki, 2012. 77 p.

Research output: ThesisMaster's thesisTheses

TY - THES

T1 - Effects of extrusion process variables on the physical properties of oat containing extrudates

AU - Alam, Syed Ariful

PY - 2012/5/15

Y1 - 2012/5/15

N2 - Oats are a good source of protein and dietary fibre, especially β-glucan. Due to the health benefits of β-glucan, oats have gained popularity in snack food formulations. The literature review deals with oats and its components, removal of lipids and fractionation of oat products. The particular emphasis of the literature review was given to studies on the effects of different oat fractions and extrusion process variables on the properties of oat-containing extrudates. The aim of this study was to find out how different oat fractions and extrusion process variables (screw speed, water content and feed rate) affect the physical and chemical properties of the extrudates. The measured physical properties were expansion, hardness and water content.Extrusion trials were carried out by using defatted oat endosperm flour (EF) as the main ingredient. Whole grain oat flour (WF) was used as a reference. To improve the nutritional quality, defatted oat protein concentrate (PC) and defatted oat bran concentrate (OBC) were added to EF. The oat fractions were defatted by supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2). Pregelatinised corn starch (CS) and waxy corn starch (WS) were added in some trials to increase the expansion of the extrudates. A co-rotating twin-screw extruder was used for the extrusion. Different process variables were: water content of the mass (16, 18 and 20%), screw speed (240, 370 and 500 rpm) and feed rate (68, 76 and 84 g/min). The temperature profile of the extruder barrel was held constant in all of the trials: 40, 70, 70, 100, 110, 130 and 130 °C (sections 1–6 and die).Screw speed had significant effect on the expansion and hardness. Expansion increased and hardness decreased with increasing screw speed. Water content of the mass affected all the response variables in WF extrudates and all but not hardness and torque in EF extrudates. Increased water content of mass decreased the expansion and hardness in WF extrudates. Feed rate did not have significant effect on the physical properties. When using EF, more expanded and less hard extrudates compared to the WF were obtained. Addition of PC or OBC (10%) decreased the expansion and increased the hardness. Mixing of EF with corn starch (CS or WS; 30%) gave less hard and more expanded extrudates compared to pure EF. The highest expansion was achieved by the addition of WS. Even addition of OBC (20%) in a presence of WS (30%) gave highly expanded and less hard extrudates with high β-glucan content 7.4% (dry weight). Decreasing the particle size of OBC (by ultra-fine milling) or the molecular weight of β-glucan (by enzymatic hydrolysis) did not affect the physical properties of the extrudates even though small decrease in hardness was observed in the trial with enzyme-hydrolysed OBC. The results showed that defatted oat fractions can successfully be used in extrusion when mixed with corn starch. Screw speed had the most profound effect on the physical properties of the oat-containing extrudates followed by the water content of mass.

AB - Oats are a good source of protein and dietary fibre, especially β-glucan. Due to the health benefits of β-glucan, oats have gained popularity in snack food formulations. The literature review deals with oats and its components, removal of lipids and fractionation of oat products. The particular emphasis of the literature review was given to studies on the effects of different oat fractions and extrusion process variables on the properties of oat-containing extrudates. The aim of this study was to find out how different oat fractions and extrusion process variables (screw speed, water content and feed rate) affect the physical and chemical properties of the extrudates. The measured physical properties were expansion, hardness and water content.Extrusion trials were carried out by using defatted oat endosperm flour (EF) as the main ingredient. Whole grain oat flour (WF) was used as a reference. To improve the nutritional quality, defatted oat protein concentrate (PC) and defatted oat bran concentrate (OBC) were added to EF. The oat fractions were defatted by supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2). Pregelatinised corn starch (CS) and waxy corn starch (WS) were added in some trials to increase the expansion of the extrudates. A co-rotating twin-screw extruder was used for the extrusion. Different process variables were: water content of the mass (16, 18 and 20%), screw speed (240, 370 and 500 rpm) and feed rate (68, 76 and 84 g/min). The temperature profile of the extruder barrel was held constant in all of the trials: 40, 70, 70, 100, 110, 130 and 130 °C (sections 1–6 and die).Screw speed had significant effect on the expansion and hardness. Expansion increased and hardness decreased with increasing screw speed. Water content of the mass affected all the response variables in WF extrudates and all but not hardness and torque in EF extrudates. Increased water content of mass decreased the expansion and hardness in WF extrudates. Feed rate did not have significant effect on the physical properties. When using EF, more expanded and less hard extrudates compared to the WF were obtained. Addition of PC or OBC (10%) decreased the expansion and increased the hardness. Mixing of EF with corn starch (CS or WS; 30%) gave less hard and more expanded extrudates compared to pure EF. The highest expansion was achieved by the addition of WS. Even addition of OBC (20%) in a presence of WS (30%) gave highly expanded and less hard extrudates with high β-glucan content 7.4% (dry weight). Decreasing the particle size of OBC (by ultra-fine milling) or the molecular weight of β-glucan (by enzymatic hydrolysis) did not affect the physical properties of the extrudates even though small decrease in hardness was observed in the trial with enzyme-hydrolysed OBC. The results showed that defatted oat fractions can successfully be used in extrusion when mixed with corn starch. Screw speed had the most profound effect on the physical properties of the oat-containing extrudates followed by the water content of mass.

KW - 416 Food Science

M3 - Master's thesis

T3 - EKT Series

CY - Helsinki

ER -