From Nordic Romanticism to Nordic Modernity

Danish Tourist Brochures in Nazi Germany, 1929-39

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This article probes Danish tourist brochures and other promotional material distributed in Germany from 1929-39. Through an analysis of a number of publications, it traces how the Tourist Association of Denmark invoked tourist imaginaries related to Nordic race theory and Nordic romanticism in the material in a variety of ways throughout the decade. Ultimately, however, it is shown that a certain discourse of Nordic modernity would come to dominate towards the end of the 1930s, also in the promotional material distributed in Nazi Germany, a society otherwise highly susceptible to the visual language of Nordic romanticism and Nordic race theory. Thus, the post-war image of the social democratic Norden was powerful already in the tourist marketers’ negotiations of national self-identification and belonging during the last pre-war years.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Contemporary History
ISSN0022-0094
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 615 History and Archaeology

Cite this

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title = "From Nordic Romanticism to Nordic Modernity: Danish Tourist Brochures in Nazi Germany, 1929-39",
abstract = "This article probes Danish tourist brochures and other promotional material distributed in Germany from 1929-39. Through an analysis of a number of publications, it traces how the Tourist Association of Denmark invoked tourist imaginaries related to Nordic race theory and Nordic romanticism in the material in a variety of ways throughout the decade. Ultimately, however, it is shown that a certain discourse of Nordic modernity would come to dominate towards the end of the 1930s, also in the promotional material distributed in Nazi Germany, a society otherwise highly susceptible to the visual language of Nordic romanticism and Nordic race theory. Thus, the post-war image of the social democratic Norden was powerful already in the tourist marketers’ negotiations of national self-identification and belonging during the last pre-war years.",
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author = "{\O}rskov, {Frederik Forrai}",
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AB - This article probes Danish tourist brochures and other promotional material distributed in Germany from 1929-39. Through an analysis of a number of publications, it traces how the Tourist Association of Denmark invoked tourist imaginaries related to Nordic race theory and Nordic romanticism in the material in a variety of ways throughout the decade. Ultimately, however, it is shown that a certain discourse of Nordic modernity would come to dominate towards the end of the 1930s, also in the promotional material distributed in Nazi Germany, a society otherwise highly susceptible to the visual language of Nordic romanticism and Nordic race theory. Thus, the post-war image of the social democratic Norden was powerful already in the tourist marketers’ negotiations of national self-identification and belonging during the last pre-war years.

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