Genetic and Environmental Influences on BMI From Late Childhood to Adolescence are Modified by Parental Education

Hanna-Reetta Lajunen, Jaakko Kaprio, Richard J. Rose, Lea Pulkkinen, Karri Silventoinen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

To investigate how parental education modifies genetic and environmental influences on variation in BMI during adolescence, self-reported BMI at 11-12, 14, and 17 years of age was collected from a population sample of 2,432 complete Finnish twin pairs born in 1983-1987. Based on parental report, twins were divided to those with high (both parents high school graduates), mixed level (one parent a graduate, the other not), and limited (neither parent a graduate) parental education. Genetic and environmental influences on variation in BMI in different education classes were modeled using twin analysis. Heritability of BMI among 11-12-year-olds with high parental education was 85-87% whereas it was 61-68% if parental education was limited or mixed level. Common environmental effect, i.e., effect of environmental factors shared by family members, was found (17-22%) if parental education was limited or mixed level but not if it was high. With increasing parental education, common environmental variance in BMI decreased at age 14 among boys (from 22 to 3%) and girls (from 17 to 10%); heritability increased among boys from 63 to 78%, but did not change among girls. The common environmental component disappeared and heritability of BMI was larger at the age of 17 in all parental education classes. To conclude, common environment did not affect variation of adolescent BMI in high-educated families but did so in families with limited parental education. This suggests that intervention and prevention campaigns could effectively target families identified by limited parental education.

Original languageEnglish
JournalObesity
Volume20
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)583-589
Number of pages7
ISSN1071-7323
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • BODY-MASS INDEX
  • YOUNG-ADULT TWINS
  • SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS
  • PHYSICAL HEALTH
  • FINNISH TWINS
  • SEX-DIFFERENCES
  • HERITABILITY
  • WEIGHT
  • HEIGHT
  • ADIPOSITY
  • 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health
  • 5141 Sociology

Cite this

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title = "Genetic and Environmental Influences on BMI From Late Childhood to Adolescence are Modified by Parental Education",
abstract = "To investigate how parental education modifies genetic and environmental influences on variation in BMI during adolescence, self-reported BMI at 11-12, 14, and 17 years of age was collected from a population sample of 2,432 complete Finnish twin pairs born in 1983-1987. Based on parental report, twins were divided to those with high (both parents high school graduates), mixed level (one parent a graduate, the other not), and limited (neither parent a graduate) parental education. Genetic and environmental influences on variation in BMI in different education classes were modeled using twin analysis. Heritability of BMI among 11-12-year-olds with high parental education was 85-87{\%} whereas it was 61-68{\%} if parental education was limited or mixed level. Common environmental effect, i.e., effect of environmental factors shared by family members, was found (17-22{\%}) if parental education was limited or mixed level but not if it was high. With increasing parental education, common environmental variance in BMI decreased at age 14 among boys (from 22 to 3{\%}) and girls (from 17 to 10{\%}); heritability increased among boys from 63 to 78{\%}, but did not change among girls. The common environmental component disappeared and heritability of BMI was larger at the age of 17 in all parental education classes. To conclude, common environment did not affect variation of adolescent BMI in high-educated families but did so in families with limited parental education. This suggests that intervention and prevention campaigns could effectively target families identified by limited parental education.",
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author = "Hanna-Reetta Lajunen and Jaakko Kaprio and Rose, {Richard J.} and Lea Pulkkinen and Karri Silventoinen",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1038/oby.2011.304",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "583--589",
journal = "Obesity",
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Genetic and Environmental Influences on BMI From Late Childhood to Adolescence are Modified by Parental Education. / Lajunen, Hanna-Reetta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rose, Richard J.; Pulkkinen, Lea; Silventoinen, Karri.

In: Obesity, Vol. 20, No. 3, 2012, p. 583-589.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genetic and Environmental Influences on BMI From Late Childhood to Adolescence are Modified by Parental Education

AU - Lajunen, Hanna-Reetta

AU - Kaprio, Jaakko

AU - Rose, Richard J.

AU - Pulkkinen, Lea

AU - Silventoinen, Karri

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - To investigate how parental education modifies genetic and environmental influences on variation in BMI during adolescence, self-reported BMI at 11-12, 14, and 17 years of age was collected from a population sample of 2,432 complete Finnish twin pairs born in 1983-1987. Based on parental report, twins were divided to those with high (both parents high school graduates), mixed level (one parent a graduate, the other not), and limited (neither parent a graduate) parental education. Genetic and environmental influences on variation in BMI in different education classes were modeled using twin analysis. Heritability of BMI among 11-12-year-olds with high parental education was 85-87% whereas it was 61-68% if parental education was limited or mixed level. Common environmental effect, i.e., effect of environmental factors shared by family members, was found (17-22%) if parental education was limited or mixed level but not if it was high. With increasing parental education, common environmental variance in BMI decreased at age 14 among boys (from 22 to 3%) and girls (from 17 to 10%); heritability increased among boys from 63 to 78%, but did not change among girls. The common environmental component disappeared and heritability of BMI was larger at the age of 17 in all parental education classes. To conclude, common environment did not affect variation of adolescent BMI in high-educated families but did so in families with limited parental education. This suggests that intervention and prevention campaigns could effectively target families identified by limited parental education.

AB - To investigate how parental education modifies genetic and environmental influences on variation in BMI during adolescence, self-reported BMI at 11-12, 14, and 17 years of age was collected from a population sample of 2,432 complete Finnish twin pairs born in 1983-1987. Based on parental report, twins were divided to those with high (both parents high school graduates), mixed level (one parent a graduate, the other not), and limited (neither parent a graduate) parental education. Genetic and environmental influences on variation in BMI in different education classes were modeled using twin analysis. Heritability of BMI among 11-12-year-olds with high parental education was 85-87% whereas it was 61-68% if parental education was limited or mixed level. Common environmental effect, i.e., effect of environmental factors shared by family members, was found (17-22%) if parental education was limited or mixed level but not if it was high. With increasing parental education, common environmental variance in BMI decreased at age 14 among boys (from 22 to 3%) and girls (from 17 to 10%); heritability increased among boys from 63 to 78%, but did not change among girls. The common environmental component disappeared and heritability of BMI was larger at the age of 17 in all parental education classes. To conclude, common environment did not affect variation of adolescent BMI in high-educated families but did so in families with limited parental education. This suggests that intervention and prevention campaigns could effectively target families identified by limited parental education.

KW - BODY-MASS INDEX

KW - YOUNG-ADULT TWINS

KW - SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS

KW - PHYSICAL HEALTH

KW - FINNISH TWINS

KW - SEX-DIFFERENCES

KW - HERITABILITY

KW - WEIGHT

KW - HEIGHT

KW - ADIPOSITY

KW - 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health

KW - 5141 Sociology

U2 - 10.1038/oby.2011.304

DO - 10.1038/oby.2011.304

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 583

EP - 589

JO - Obesity

JF - Obesity

SN - 1071-7323

IS - 3

ER -