Abstract

While polygenic risk scores (PRS) have been shown to predict many diseases and risk factors, the potential of genomic prediction in harm caused by alcohol use has not yet been extensively studied. Here, we built a novel polygenic risk score of 1.1 million variants for alcohol consumption and studied its predictive capacity in 96,499 participants from the FinnGen study and 39,695 participants from prospective cohorts with detailed baseline data and up to 25 years of follow-up time. A 1 SD increase in the PRS was associated with 11.2 g (=0.93 drinks) higher weekly alcohol consumption (CI = 9.85-12.58 g, p = 2.3 x 10(-58)). The PRS was associated with alcohol-related morbidity (4785 incident events) and the risk estimate between the highest and lowest quintiles of the PRS was 1.83 (95% CI = 1.66-2.01, p = 1.6 x 10(-36)). When adjusted for self-reported alcohol consumption, education, marital status, and gamma-glutamyl transferase blood levels in 28,639 participants with comprehensive baseline data from prospective cohorts, the risk estimate between the highest and lowest quintiles of the PRS was 1.58 (CI = 1.26-1.99, p = 8.2 x 10(-5)). The PRS was also associated with all-cause mortality with a risk estimate of 1.33 between the highest and lowest quintiles (CI = 1.20-1.47, p = 4.5 x 10(-8)) in the adjusted model. In conclusion, the PRS for alcohol consumption independently associates for both alcohol-related morbidity and all-cause mortality. Together, these findings underline the importance of heritable factors in alcohol-related health burden while highlighting how measured genetic risk for an important behavioral risk factor can be used to predict related health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number23
JournalTranslational Psychiatry
Volume10
Issue number1
Number of pages8
ISSN2158-3188
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Jan 2020
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • CONSUMPTION
  • POLYGENIC RISK
  • SMOKING
  • TWIN
  • UK
  • 3124 Neurology and psychiatry

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