Histamine, histamine H3 receptor, and alcohol use disorder

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Alcohol use disorder is associated with several mental, physical, and social problems. Its treatment is difficult and often requires a combination of pharmacological and behavioural therapy. The brain histaminergic system, one of the wake-active systems that controls whole-brain activity, operates through three neuronal GPCRs. The histamine H-3 receptor (Hrh3), which is expressed in many brain areas involved in alcohol drinking and alcohol reward, can be targeted with a number of drugs developed initially for cognitive disorders and/or disorders related to sleep, wakefulness, and alertness. In all rodent alcohol drinking models tested so far, H-3 receptor antagonists have reduced alcohol drinking and alcohol-induced place preference and cue-induced alcohol reinstatement. Several H-3 receptor antagonists tested and found to be safe for humans could be subjected to clinical tests to treat alcohol use disorder. Preference should be given to short-acting drugs to avoid the sleep problems associated with the wake-maintaining effects of the drugs.

Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on New Uses for 21st Century. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v177.3/issuetoc

Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Pharmacology
Volume177
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)634-641
Number of pages8
ISSN0007-1188
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Feb 2020
MoE publication typeA2 Review article in a scientific journal

Fields of Science

  • 317 Pharmacy
  • VENTRAL TEGMENTAL AREA
  • CONDITIONED PLACE PREFERENCE
  • COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY
  • MU-OPIOID-RECEPTOR
  • H3 RECEPTOR
  • DOPAMINERGIC-NEURONS
  • NUCLEUS-ACCUMBENS
  • SUBSTANTIA-NIGRA
  • GENE-EXPRESSION
  • CONCISE GUIDE

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