"I need to be Individually loved, Lord, let me Recognize your Gift!" Gifts of Love in Hugh of St. Victor's (d. 1141) Soliloquium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Building on general accounts of recognition and gift-exchange in the contemporary theory of recognition, this article examines the medieval philosophical psychology of gifts and love. It will show that medieval philosophically oriented theological texts, particularly the so-called spiritual literature, contain intricate discussions of the nature of the gift, as well as the dialogical formation of the self, both of which are central issues in modern recognition theories. The claim will be exemplified by an analysis of the spiritual treatise Soliloquium de arrha animae, or Soliloquy on the Betrothal-Gift of the Soul, by the twelfth-century theologian, Hugh of St. Victor (d. 1141). The text manifests (1) the idea of the soul’s need to be individually loved; (2) the multilayered notion of the gift; and (3) various descriptions of the acts of recognition between the soul and God. Moreover, it serves as an example of a historical articulation of phenomena that have been interpreted in modern terms as a universal human need to be recognized individually as a person.
Original languageEnglish
JournalSpeculum
ISSN0038-7134
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 2020
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Cite this

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title = "{"}I need to be Individually loved, Lord, let me Recognize your Gift!{"} Gifts of Love in Hugh of St. Victor's (d. 1141) Soliloquium",
abstract = "Building on general accounts of recognition and gift-exchange in the contemporary theory of recognition, this article examines the medieval philosophical psychology of gifts and love. It will show that medieval philosophically oriented theological texts, particularly the so-called spiritual literature, contain intricate discussions of the nature of the gift, as well as the dialogical formation of the self, both of which are central issues in modern recognition theories. The claim will be exemplified by an analysis of the spiritual treatise Soliloquium de arrha animae, or Soliloquy on the Betrothal-Gift of the Soul, by the twelfth-century theologian, Hugh of St. Victor (d. 1141). The text manifests (1) the idea of the soul’s need to be individually loved; (2) the multilayered notion of the gift; and (3) various descriptions of the acts of recognition between the soul and God. Moreover, it serves as an example of a historical articulation of phenomena that have been interpreted in modern terms as a universal human need to be recognized individually as a person.",
author = "Palmen, {Ritva Anneli}",
year = "2020",
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issn = "0038-7134",
publisher = "The University of Chicago Press",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - "I need to be Individually loved, Lord, let me Recognize your Gift!" Gifts of Love in Hugh of St. Victor's (d. 1141) Soliloquium

AU - Palmen, Ritva Anneli

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N2 - Building on general accounts of recognition and gift-exchange in the contemporary theory of recognition, this article examines the medieval philosophical psychology of gifts and love. It will show that medieval philosophically oriented theological texts, particularly the so-called spiritual literature, contain intricate discussions of the nature of the gift, as well as the dialogical formation of the self, both of which are central issues in modern recognition theories. The claim will be exemplified by an analysis of the spiritual treatise Soliloquium de arrha animae, or Soliloquy on the Betrothal-Gift of the Soul, by the twelfth-century theologian, Hugh of St. Victor (d. 1141). The text manifests (1) the idea of the soul’s need to be individually loved; (2) the multilayered notion of the gift; and (3) various descriptions of the acts of recognition between the soul and God. Moreover, it serves as an example of a historical articulation of phenomena that have been interpreted in modern terms as a universal human need to be recognized individually as a person.

AB - Building on general accounts of recognition and gift-exchange in the contemporary theory of recognition, this article examines the medieval philosophical psychology of gifts and love. It will show that medieval philosophically oriented theological texts, particularly the so-called spiritual literature, contain intricate discussions of the nature of the gift, as well as the dialogical formation of the self, both of which are central issues in modern recognition theories. The claim will be exemplified by an analysis of the spiritual treatise Soliloquium de arrha animae, or Soliloquy on the Betrothal-Gift of the Soul, by the twelfth-century theologian, Hugh of St. Victor (d. 1141). The text manifests (1) the idea of the soul’s need to be individually loved; (2) the multilayered notion of the gift; and (3) various descriptions of the acts of recognition between the soul and God. Moreover, it serves as an example of a historical articulation of phenomena that have been interpreted in modern terms as a universal human need to be recognized individually as a person.

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