Inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme I caused by autolysis of potato proteins by enzymatic activities confined to different parts of the potato tuber

Sari Mäkinen, Jani Kelloniemi, Anne Pihlanto, Kristiina Mäkinen, Hannu Korhonen, Anu Hopia, Jari P. T Valkonen, Jari Valkonen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Autolysis of protein isolates from vascular bundle and inner tuber tissues of potato (Solanum tuberosum) enhanced the inhibition of the angiotensin converting enzyme I (ACE), a biochemical factor affecting blood pressure (hypertension). The physiological age of the tuber affected the strength of ACE inhibition, the rate of its increase during autolysis, and the tuber tissue where ACE inhibition was most pronounced. The highest inhibitory activities (50% reduction in ACE activity achieved following autolysis at a protein concentration of 0.36 mg mL(-1)) were measured in tubers after 5-6 months of storage prior to sprouting. The rate of ACE inhibition was positively correlated with protease activity in tuber tissues. Amendment of the autolysis reaction with protein substrates from which bioactive ACE-inhibitory peptides may be released, for example, a purified recombinant protein or a concentrate of total tuber proteins, also enhanced ACE inhibition. Many tuber proteins including aspartic protease inhibitors were degraded during autolysis. The data provide indications of differences in the enzymatic activities confined to different parts of the potato tuber at different physiological stages. Results suggest that native enzymes and substrate proteins of potato tubers can be utilized in search of dietary tools to manage elevated blood pressure.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume56
Issue number21
Pages (from-to)9875-9883
Number of pages9
ISSN0021-8561
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 414 Agricultural biotechnology
  • 411 Agriculture and forestry

Cite this

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title = "Inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme I caused by autolysis of potato proteins by enzymatic activities confined to different parts of the potato tuber",
abstract = "Autolysis of protein isolates from vascular bundle and inner tuber tissues of potato (Solanum tuberosum) enhanced the inhibition of the angiotensin converting enzyme I (ACE), a biochemical factor affecting blood pressure (hypertension). The physiological age of the tuber affected the strength of ACE inhibition, the rate of its increase during autolysis, and the tuber tissue where ACE inhibition was most pronounced. The highest inhibitory activities (50{\%} reduction in ACE activity achieved following autolysis at a protein concentration of 0.36 mg mL(-1)) were measured in tubers after 5-6 months of storage prior to sprouting. The rate of ACE inhibition was positively correlated with protease activity in tuber tissues. Amendment of the autolysis reaction with protein substrates from which bioactive ACE-inhibitory peptides may be released, for example, a purified recombinant protein or a concentrate of total tuber proteins, also enhanced ACE inhibition. Many tuber proteins including aspartic protease inhibitors were degraded during autolysis. The data provide indications of differences in the enzymatic activities confined to different parts of the potato tuber at different physiological stages. Results suggest that native enzymes and substrate proteins of potato tubers can be utilized in search of dietary tools to manage elevated blood pressure.",
keywords = "414 Agricultural biotechnology, 411 Agriculture and forestry",
author = "Sari M{\"a}kinen and Jani Kelloniemi and Anne Pihlanto and Kristiina M{\"a}kinen and Hannu Korhonen and Anu Hopia and Valkonen, {Jari P. T} and Jari Valkonen",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1021/jf8016817",
language = "English",
volume = "56",
pages = "9875--9883",
journal = "Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry",
issn = "0021-8561",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "21",

}

Inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme I caused by autolysis of potato proteins by enzymatic activities confined to different parts of the potato tuber. / Mäkinen, Sari; Kelloniemi, Jani; Pihlanto, Anne; Mäkinen, Kristiina; Korhonen, Hannu; Hopia, Anu; Valkonen, Jari P. T; Valkonen, Jari.

In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Vol. 56, No. 21, 2008, p. 9875-9883.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme I caused by autolysis of potato proteins by enzymatic activities confined to different parts of the potato tuber

AU - Mäkinen, Sari

AU - Kelloniemi, Jani

AU - Pihlanto, Anne

AU - Mäkinen, Kristiina

AU - Korhonen, Hannu

AU - Hopia, Anu

AU - Valkonen, Jari P. T

AU - Valkonen, Jari

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Autolysis of protein isolates from vascular bundle and inner tuber tissues of potato (Solanum tuberosum) enhanced the inhibition of the angiotensin converting enzyme I (ACE), a biochemical factor affecting blood pressure (hypertension). The physiological age of the tuber affected the strength of ACE inhibition, the rate of its increase during autolysis, and the tuber tissue where ACE inhibition was most pronounced. The highest inhibitory activities (50% reduction in ACE activity achieved following autolysis at a protein concentration of 0.36 mg mL(-1)) were measured in tubers after 5-6 months of storage prior to sprouting. The rate of ACE inhibition was positively correlated with protease activity in tuber tissues. Amendment of the autolysis reaction with protein substrates from which bioactive ACE-inhibitory peptides may be released, for example, a purified recombinant protein or a concentrate of total tuber proteins, also enhanced ACE inhibition. Many tuber proteins including aspartic protease inhibitors were degraded during autolysis. The data provide indications of differences in the enzymatic activities confined to different parts of the potato tuber at different physiological stages. Results suggest that native enzymes and substrate proteins of potato tubers can be utilized in search of dietary tools to manage elevated blood pressure.

AB - Autolysis of protein isolates from vascular bundle and inner tuber tissues of potato (Solanum tuberosum) enhanced the inhibition of the angiotensin converting enzyme I (ACE), a biochemical factor affecting blood pressure (hypertension). The physiological age of the tuber affected the strength of ACE inhibition, the rate of its increase during autolysis, and the tuber tissue where ACE inhibition was most pronounced. The highest inhibitory activities (50% reduction in ACE activity achieved following autolysis at a protein concentration of 0.36 mg mL(-1)) were measured in tubers after 5-6 months of storage prior to sprouting. The rate of ACE inhibition was positively correlated with protease activity in tuber tissues. Amendment of the autolysis reaction with protein substrates from which bioactive ACE-inhibitory peptides may be released, for example, a purified recombinant protein or a concentrate of total tuber proteins, also enhanced ACE inhibition. Many tuber proteins including aspartic protease inhibitors were degraded during autolysis. The data provide indications of differences in the enzymatic activities confined to different parts of the potato tuber at different physiological stages. Results suggest that native enzymes and substrate proteins of potato tubers can be utilized in search of dietary tools to manage elevated blood pressure.

KW - 414 Agricultural biotechnology

KW - 411 Agriculture and forestry

U2 - 10.1021/jf8016817

DO - 10.1021/jf8016817

M3 - Article

VL - 56

SP - 9875

EP - 9883

JO - Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

JF - Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

SN - 0021-8561

IS - 21

ER -