Inside Cover Image: Delivery of Therapeutics With Nanoparticles: What’s New in Cancer Immunotherapy?

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Abstract

The application of nanotechnology to the treatment of cancer or other diseases has been boosted during the last decades due to the possibility to precise deliver of drugs where needed, enabling a decrease in the drug’s side effects. Nanocarriers are particularly valuable for potentiate the simultaneous co-delivery of multiple drugs in the same particle for the treatment of heavily burdening diseases like cancer. Immunotherapy represents a new concept in the treatment of cancer and has shown outstanding results in patients treated with check-point inhibitors. Thereby, researchers are applying nanotechnology to cancer immunotherapy towards the development of nanocarriers for delivery of cancer vaccines and chemo-immunotherapies. Cancer nanovaccines can be envisioned as nanocarriers co-delivering antigens and adjuvants, molecules often presenting different physicochemical properties, in cancer therapy. A wide range of nanocarriers (e.g., polymeric, lipid-based and inorganic) allow the co-formulation of these molecules, or the delivery of chemo- and immune-therapeutics in the same system. Finally, there is a trend towards the use of biologically inspired and derived nanocarriers. In this review, we present the recent developments in the field of immunotherapy, describing the different system proposed by categories: polymeric nanoparticles, lipid-based nanosystems, metallic and inorganic nanosystems and, finally, biologically inspired and derived nanovaccines.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd.
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2017
MoE publication typeF1 Published independent work of art

Fields of Science

  • 317 Pharmacy

Cite this

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title = "Inside Cover Image: Delivery of Therapeutics With Nanoparticles: What’s New in Cancer Immunotherapy?",
abstract = "The application of nanotechnology to the treatment of cancer or other diseases has been boosted during the last decades due to the possibility to precise deliver of drugs where needed, enabling a decrease in the drug’s side effects. Nanocarriers are particularly valuable for potentiate the simultaneous co-delivery of multiple drugs in the same particle for the treatment of heavily burdening diseases like cancer. Immunotherapy represents a new concept in the treatment of cancer and has shown outstanding results in patients treated with check-point inhibitors. Thereby, researchers are applying nanotechnology to cancer immunotherapy towards the development of nanocarriers for delivery of cancer vaccines and chemo-immunotherapies. Cancer nanovaccines can be envisioned as nanocarriers co-delivering antigens and adjuvants, molecules often presenting different physicochemical properties, in cancer therapy. A wide range of nanocarriers (e.g., polymeric, lipid-based and inorganic) allow the co-formulation of these molecules, or the delivery of chemo- and immune-therapeutics in the same system. Finally, there is a trend towards the use of biologically inspired and derived nanocarriers. In this review, we present the recent developments in the field of immunotherapy, describing the different system proposed by categories: polymeric nanoparticles, lipid-based nanosystems, metallic and inorganic nanosystems and, finally, biologically inspired and derived nanovaccines.",
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author = "Flavia Fontana and Dongfei Liu and Hirvonen, {Jouni Tapio} and {Almeida Santos}, Helder",
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N2 - The application of nanotechnology to the treatment of cancer or other diseases has been boosted during the last decades due to the possibility to precise deliver of drugs where needed, enabling a decrease in the drug’s side effects. Nanocarriers are particularly valuable for potentiate the simultaneous co-delivery of multiple drugs in the same particle for the treatment of heavily burdening diseases like cancer. Immunotherapy represents a new concept in the treatment of cancer and has shown outstanding results in patients treated with check-point inhibitors. Thereby, researchers are applying nanotechnology to cancer immunotherapy towards the development of nanocarriers for delivery of cancer vaccines and chemo-immunotherapies. Cancer nanovaccines can be envisioned as nanocarriers co-delivering antigens and adjuvants, molecules often presenting different physicochemical properties, in cancer therapy. A wide range of nanocarriers (e.g., polymeric, lipid-based and inorganic) allow the co-formulation of these molecules, or the delivery of chemo- and immune-therapeutics in the same system. Finally, there is a trend towards the use of biologically inspired and derived nanocarriers. In this review, we present the recent developments in the field of immunotherapy, describing the different system proposed by categories: polymeric nanoparticles, lipid-based nanosystems, metallic and inorganic nanosystems and, finally, biologically inspired and derived nanovaccines.

AB - The application of nanotechnology to the treatment of cancer or other diseases has been boosted during the last decades due to the possibility to precise deliver of drugs where needed, enabling a decrease in the drug’s side effects. Nanocarriers are particularly valuable for potentiate the simultaneous co-delivery of multiple drugs in the same particle for the treatment of heavily burdening diseases like cancer. Immunotherapy represents a new concept in the treatment of cancer and has shown outstanding results in patients treated with check-point inhibitors. Thereby, researchers are applying nanotechnology to cancer immunotherapy towards the development of nanocarriers for delivery of cancer vaccines and chemo-immunotherapies. Cancer nanovaccines can be envisioned as nanocarriers co-delivering antigens and adjuvants, molecules often presenting different physicochemical properties, in cancer therapy. A wide range of nanocarriers (e.g., polymeric, lipid-based and inorganic) allow the co-formulation of these molecules, or the delivery of chemo- and immune-therapeutics in the same system. Finally, there is a trend towards the use of biologically inspired and derived nanocarriers. In this review, we present the recent developments in the field of immunotherapy, describing the different system proposed by categories: polymeric nanoparticles, lipid-based nanosystems, metallic and inorganic nanosystems and, finally, biologically inspired and derived nanovaccines.

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