Longitudinal assessment of microbial dysbiosis, fecal unconjugated bile acid concentrations, and disease activity in dogs with steroid-responsive chronic inflammatory enteropathy

Blake C. Guard, Julia B. Honneffer, Albert E. Jergens, Michelle M. Jonika, Linda Toresson, Yuri A. Lawrence, Craig B. Webb, Steve Hill, Jonathan A. Lidbury, Joerg M. Steiner, Jan S. Suchodolski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Abstract Background Mounting evidence from human studies suggests that bile acid dysmetabolism might play a role in various human chronic gastrointestinal diseases. It is unknown whether fecal bile acid dysmetabolism occurs in dogs with chronic inflammatory enteropathy (CE). Objective To assess microbial dysbiosis, fecal unconjugated bile acids (fUBA), and disease activity in dogs with steroid-responsive CE. Animals Twenty-four healthy control dogs and 23 dogs with steroid-responsive CE. Methods In this retrospective study, fUBA were measured and analyzed. Fecal microbiota were assessed using a dysbiosis index. The canine inflammatory bowel disease activity index was used to evaluate remission of clinical signs. This was a multi-institutional study where dogs with steroid-responsive CE were evaluated over time. Results The dysbiosis index was increased in dogs with CE (median, 2.5; range, ?6.2 to 6.5) at baseline compared with healthy dogs (median, ?4.5; range, ?6.5 to ?2.6; P?=?.002) but did not change in dogs with CE over time. Secondary fUBA were decreased in dogs with CE (median, 29%; range, 1%-99%) compared with healthy dogs (median, 88%; 4%-96%; P?=?.049). The percent of secondary fUBA in dogs with CE increased from baseline values (median, 28%; range, 1%-99%) after 2-3?months of treatment (median, 94%; range, 1%-99%; P?=?0.0183). Conclusions and Clinical Importance These findings suggest that corticosteroids regulate fecal bile acids in dogs with CE. Additionally, resolution of clinical activity index in dogs with therapeutically managed CE and bile acid dysmetabolism are likely correlated. However, subclinical disease (i.e., microbial dysbiosis) can persist in dogs with steroid-responsive CE.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume0
Issue number0
ISSN0891-6640
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Apr 2019
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • chenodeoxycholic acid
  • bile acid dysmetabolism
  • cholic acid
  • deoxycholic acid
  • inflammatory bowel disease
  • lithocholic acid
  • 413 Veterinary science

Cite this

Guard, Blake C. ; Honneffer, Julia B. ; Jergens, Albert E. ; Jonika, Michelle M. ; Toresson, Linda ; Lawrence, Yuri A. ; Webb, Craig B. ; Hill, Steve ; Lidbury, Jonathan A. ; Steiner, Joerg M. ; Suchodolski, Jan S. / Longitudinal assessment of microbial dysbiosis, fecal unconjugated bile acid concentrations, and disease activity in dogs with steroid-responsive chronic inflammatory enteropathy. In: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 0, No. 0.
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title = "Longitudinal assessment of microbial dysbiosis, fecal unconjugated bile acid concentrations, and disease activity in dogs with steroid-responsive chronic inflammatory enteropathy",
abstract = "Abstract Background Mounting evidence from human studies suggests that bile acid dysmetabolism might play a role in various human chronic gastrointestinal diseases. It is unknown whether fecal bile acid dysmetabolism occurs in dogs with chronic inflammatory enteropathy (CE). Objective To assess microbial dysbiosis, fecal unconjugated bile acids (fUBA), and disease activity in dogs with steroid-responsive CE. Animals Twenty-four healthy control dogs and 23 dogs with steroid-responsive CE. Methods In this retrospective study, fUBA were measured and analyzed. Fecal microbiota were assessed using a dysbiosis index. The canine inflammatory bowel disease activity index was used to evaluate remission of clinical signs. This was a multi-institutional study where dogs with steroid-responsive CE were evaluated over time. Results The dysbiosis index was increased in dogs with CE (median, 2.5; range, ?6.2 to 6.5) at baseline compared with healthy dogs (median, ?4.5; range, ?6.5 to ?2.6; P?=?.002) but did not change in dogs with CE over time. Secondary fUBA were decreased in dogs with CE (median, 29{\%}; range, 1{\%}-99{\%}) compared with healthy dogs (median, 88{\%}; 4{\%}-96{\%}; P?=?.049). The percent of secondary fUBA in dogs with CE increased from baseline values (median, 28{\%}; range, 1{\%}-99{\%}) after 2-3?months of treatment (median, 94{\%}; range, 1{\%}-99{\%}; P?=?0.0183). Conclusions and Clinical Importance These findings suggest that corticosteroids regulate fecal bile acids in dogs with CE. Additionally, resolution of clinical activity index in dogs with therapeutically managed CE and bile acid dysmetabolism are likely correlated. However, subclinical disease (i.e., microbial dysbiosis) can persist in dogs with steroid-responsive CE.",
keywords = "chenodeoxycholic acid, bile acid dysmetabolism, cholic acid, deoxycholic acid, inflammatory bowel disease, lithocholic acid, 413 Veterinary science",
author = "Guard, {Blake C.} and Honneffer, {Julia B.} and Jergens, {Albert E.} and Jonika, {Michelle M.} and Linda Toresson and Lawrence, {Yuri A.} and Webb, {Craig B.} and Steve Hill and Lidbury, {Jonathan A.} and Steiner, {Joerg M.} and Suchodolski, {Jan S.}",
year = "2019",
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Longitudinal assessment of microbial dysbiosis, fecal unconjugated bile acid concentrations, and disease activity in dogs with steroid-responsive chronic inflammatory enteropathy. / Guard, Blake C.; Honneffer, Julia B.; Jergens, Albert E.; Jonika, Michelle M.; Toresson, Linda; Lawrence, Yuri A.; Webb, Craig B.; Hill, Steve; Lidbury, Jonathan A.; Steiner, Joerg M.; Suchodolski, Jan S.

In: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Vol. 0, No. 0, 07.04.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Longitudinal assessment of microbial dysbiosis, fecal unconjugated bile acid concentrations, and disease activity in dogs with steroid-responsive chronic inflammatory enteropathy

AU - Guard, Blake C.

AU - Honneffer, Julia B.

AU - Jergens, Albert E.

AU - Jonika, Michelle M.

AU - Toresson, Linda

AU - Lawrence, Yuri A.

AU - Webb, Craig B.

AU - Hill, Steve

AU - Lidbury, Jonathan A.

AU - Steiner, Joerg M.

AU - Suchodolski, Jan S.

PY - 2019/4/7

Y1 - 2019/4/7

N2 - Abstract Background Mounting evidence from human studies suggests that bile acid dysmetabolism might play a role in various human chronic gastrointestinal diseases. It is unknown whether fecal bile acid dysmetabolism occurs in dogs with chronic inflammatory enteropathy (CE). Objective To assess microbial dysbiosis, fecal unconjugated bile acids (fUBA), and disease activity in dogs with steroid-responsive CE. Animals Twenty-four healthy control dogs and 23 dogs with steroid-responsive CE. Methods In this retrospective study, fUBA were measured and analyzed. Fecal microbiota were assessed using a dysbiosis index. The canine inflammatory bowel disease activity index was used to evaluate remission of clinical signs. This was a multi-institutional study where dogs with steroid-responsive CE were evaluated over time. Results The dysbiosis index was increased in dogs with CE (median, 2.5; range, ?6.2 to 6.5) at baseline compared with healthy dogs (median, ?4.5; range, ?6.5 to ?2.6; P?=?.002) but did not change in dogs with CE over time. Secondary fUBA were decreased in dogs with CE (median, 29%; range, 1%-99%) compared with healthy dogs (median, 88%; 4%-96%; P?=?.049). The percent of secondary fUBA in dogs with CE increased from baseline values (median, 28%; range, 1%-99%) after 2-3?months of treatment (median, 94%; range, 1%-99%; P?=?0.0183). Conclusions and Clinical Importance These findings suggest that corticosteroids regulate fecal bile acids in dogs with CE. Additionally, resolution of clinical activity index in dogs with therapeutically managed CE and bile acid dysmetabolism are likely correlated. However, subclinical disease (i.e., microbial dysbiosis) can persist in dogs with steroid-responsive CE.

AB - Abstract Background Mounting evidence from human studies suggests that bile acid dysmetabolism might play a role in various human chronic gastrointestinal diseases. It is unknown whether fecal bile acid dysmetabolism occurs in dogs with chronic inflammatory enteropathy (CE). Objective To assess microbial dysbiosis, fecal unconjugated bile acids (fUBA), and disease activity in dogs with steroid-responsive CE. Animals Twenty-four healthy control dogs and 23 dogs with steroid-responsive CE. Methods In this retrospective study, fUBA were measured and analyzed. Fecal microbiota were assessed using a dysbiosis index. The canine inflammatory bowel disease activity index was used to evaluate remission of clinical signs. This was a multi-institutional study where dogs with steroid-responsive CE were evaluated over time. Results The dysbiosis index was increased in dogs with CE (median, 2.5; range, ?6.2 to 6.5) at baseline compared with healthy dogs (median, ?4.5; range, ?6.5 to ?2.6; P?=?.002) but did not change in dogs with CE over time. Secondary fUBA were decreased in dogs with CE (median, 29%; range, 1%-99%) compared with healthy dogs (median, 88%; 4%-96%; P?=?.049). The percent of secondary fUBA in dogs with CE increased from baseline values (median, 28%; range, 1%-99%) after 2-3?months of treatment (median, 94%; range, 1%-99%; P?=?0.0183). Conclusions and Clinical Importance These findings suggest that corticosteroids regulate fecal bile acids in dogs with CE. Additionally, resolution of clinical activity index in dogs with therapeutically managed CE and bile acid dysmetabolism are likely correlated. However, subclinical disease (i.e., microbial dysbiosis) can persist in dogs with steroid-responsive CE.

KW - chenodeoxycholic acid

KW - bile acid dysmetabolism

KW - cholic acid

KW - deoxycholic acid

KW - inflammatory bowel disease

KW - lithocholic acid

KW - 413 Veterinary science

U2 - 10.1111/jvim.15493

DO - 10.1111/jvim.15493

M3 - Article

VL - 0

JO - Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine

JF - Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine

SN - 0891-6640

IS - 0

ER -