Abstract

Running large-eddy simulations (LESs) can be burdensome and computationally too expensive from the application point of view, for example, to support urban planning. In this study, regression models are used to replicate modelled air pollutant concentrations from LES in urban boulevards. We study the performance of regression models and discuss how to detect situations where the models are applied outside their training domain and their outputs cannot be trusted. Regression models from 10 different model families are trained and a cross-validation methodology is used to evaluate their performance and to find the best set of features needed to reproduce the LES outputs. We also test the regression models on an independent testing dataset. Our results suggest that in general, log-linear regression gives the best and most robust performance on new independent data. It clearly outperforms the dummy model which would predict constant concentrations for all locations (multiplicative minimum RMSE (mRMSE) of 0.76 vs. 1.78 of the dummy model). Furthermore, we demonstrate that it is possible to detect concept drift, i.e. situations where the model is applied outside its training domain and a new LES run may be necessary to obtain reliable results. Regression models can be used to replace LES simulations in estimating air pollutant concentrations, unless higher accuracy is needed. In order to have reliable results, it is however important to do the model and feature selection carefully to avoid overfitting and to use methods to detect the concept drift.

Original languageEnglish
JournalGeoscientific Model Development
Volume14
Issue number12
Pages (from-to)7411-7424
Number of pages14
ISSN1991-959X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Dec 2021
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 113 Computer and information sciences
  • NEURAL-NETWORK
  • RANDOM FOREST
  • REGRESSION
  • DISPERSION
  • FORMULATION
  • QUALITY
  • MOBILE

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