More than A to B

Understanding and managing visitor spatial behaviour in urban forests using public participation GIS

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Planning and management needs up-to-date, easily-obtainable and accurate information on the spatial and social aspects of visitor behaviour in order to balance human use and impacts, and protection of natural resources in public parks. We used a web-based public participation GIS (PPGIS) approach to gather citizen data on visitor behaviour in Helsinki's Central Park in order to aid collaborative spatial decision-making. The study combined smartphone GPS tracking, route drawing and a questionnaire to examine differences between user groups in their use of formal trails, off-trail behaviour and the motivations that affect it. In our sample (n = 233), different activity types were associated with distinctive spatial patterns and potential extent of impacts. The density mapping and statistical analyses indicated three types of behaviour: predominantly on or close to formal trails (runners and cyclists), spatially concentrated off-trail behaviour confined to a few informal paths (mountain bikers), and dispersed off trail use pattern (walkers and dog walkers). Across all user groups, off-trail behaviour was mainly motivated by positive attraction towards the environment such as scenic view, exploration, and viewing flora and fauna. Study findings lead to several management recommendations that were presented to city officials. These include reducing dispersion and the spatial extent of trampling impacts by encouraging use of a limited number of well-established informal paths away from sensitive vegetation and protected habitats. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Environmental Management
Volume207
Pages (from-to)124-133
Number of pages10
ISSN0301-4797
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 1172 Environmental sciences
  • urban forest management
  • public participation
  • recreation
  • spatial behaviour
  • off-trail use
  • smartphone GPS tracking
  • understorey vegetation
  • recreational trails
  • outdoor recreation
  • movement patterns
  • informal trails
  • GPS
  • tracking
  • areas
  • management
  • impacts

Cite this

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title = "More than A to B: Understanding and managing visitor spatial behaviour in urban forests using public participation GIS",
abstract = "Planning and management needs up-to-date, easily-obtainable and accurate information on the spatial and social aspects of visitor behaviour in order to balance human use and impacts, and protection of natural resources in public parks. We used a web-based public participation GIS (PPGIS) approach to gather citizen data on visitor behaviour in Helsinki's Central Park in order to aid collaborative spatial decision-making. The study combined smartphone GPS tracking, route drawing and a questionnaire to examine differences between user groups in their use of formal trails, off-trail behaviour and the motivations that affect it. In our sample (n = 233), different activity types were associated with distinctive spatial patterns and potential extent of impacts. The density mapping and statistical analyses indicated three types of behaviour: predominantly on or close to formal trails (runners and cyclists), spatially concentrated off-trail behaviour confined to a few informal paths (mountain bikers), and dispersed off trail use pattern (walkers and dog walkers). Across all user groups, off-trail behaviour was mainly motivated by positive attraction towards the environment such as scenic view, exploration, and viewing flora and fauna. Study findings lead to several management recommendations that were presented to city officials. These include reducing dispersion and the spatial extent of trampling impacts by encouraging use of a limited number of well-established informal paths away from sensitive vegetation and protected habitats. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "1172 Environmental sciences, urban forest management, public participation, recreation, spatial behaviour, off-trail use, smartphone GPS tracking, understorey vegetation, recreational trails, outdoor recreation, movement patterns, informal trails, GPS, tracking, areas, management, impacts",
author = "Silviya Korpilo and Tarmo Virtanen and Tiina Saukkonen and Susanna Lehv{\"a}virta",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
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doi = "10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.11.020",
language = "English",
volume = "207",
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journal = "Journal of Environmental Management",
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More than A to B : Understanding and managing visitor spatial behaviour in urban forests using public participation GIS. / Korpilo, Silviya; Virtanen, Tarmo; Saukkonen, Tiina; Lehvävirta, Susanna.

In: Journal of Environmental Management, Vol. 207, 01.02.2018, p. 124-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - More than A to B

T2 - Understanding and managing visitor spatial behaviour in urban forests using public participation GIS

AU - Korpilo, Silviya

AU - Virtanen, Tarmo

AU - Saukkonen, Tiina

AU - Lehvävirta, Susanna

PY - 2018/2/1

Y1 - 2018/2/1

N2 - Planning and management needs up-to-date, easily-obtainable and accurate information on the spatial and social aspects of visitor behaviour in order to balance human use and impacts, and protection of natural resources in public parks. We used a web-based public participation GIS (PPGIS) approach to gather citizen data on visitor behaviour in Helsinki's Central Park in order to aid collaborative spatial decision-making. The study combined smartphone GPS tracking, route drawing and a questionnaire to examine differences between user groups in their use of formal trails, off-trail behaviour and the motivations that affect it. In our sample (n = 233), different activity types were associated with distinctive spatial patterns and potential extent of impacts. The density mapping and statistical analyses indicated three types of behaviour: predominantly on or close to formal trails (runners and cyclists), spatially concentrated off-trail behaviour confined to a few informal paths (mountain bikers), and dispersed off trail use pattern (walkers and dog walkers). Across all user groups, off-trail behaviour was mainly motivated by positive attraction towards the environment such as scenic view, exploration, and viewing flora and fauna. Study findings lead to several management recommendations that were presented to city officials. These include reducing dispersion and the spatial extent of trampling impacts by encouraging use of a limited number of well-established informal paths away from sensitive vegetation and protected habitats. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - Planning and management needs up-to-date, easily-obtainable and accurate information on the spatial and social aspects of visitor behaviour in order to balance human use and impacts, and protection of natural resources in public parks. We used a web-based public participation GIS (PPGIS) approach to gather citizen data on visitor behaviour in Helsinki's Central Park in order to aid collaborative spatial decision-making. The study combined smartphone GPS tracking, route drawing and a questionnaire to examine differences between user groups in their use of formal trails, off-trail behaviour and the motivations that affect it. In our sample (n = 233), different activity types were associated with distinctive spatial patterns and potential extent of impacts. The density mapping and statistical analyses indicated three types of behaviour: predominantly on or close to formal trails (runners and cyclists), spatially concentrated off-trail behaviour confined to a few informal paths (mountain bikers), and dispersed off trail use pattern (walkers and dog walkers). Across all user groups, off-trail behaviour was mainly motivated by positive attraction towards the environment such as scenic view, exploration, and viewing flora and fauna. Study findings lead to several management recommendations that were presented to city officials. These include reducing dispersion and the spatial extent of trampling impacts by encouraging use of a limited number of well-established informal paths away from sensitive vegetation and protected habitats. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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KW - urban forest management

KW - public participation

KW - recreation

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KW - off-trail use

KW - smartphone GPS tracking

KW - understorey vegetation

KW - recreational trails

KW - outdoor recreation

KW - movement patterns

KW - informal trails

KW - GPS

KW - tracking

KW - areas

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KW - impacts

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JO - Journal of Environmental Management

JF - Journal of Environmental Management

SN - 0301-4797

ER -