Naming rights, place branding, and the cultural landscapes of neoliberal urbanism

Reuben Rose-Redwood (Editor), Jani Vuolteenaho (Editor), Craig Young (Editor), Light Duncan (Editor)

Research output: Book/ReportAnthology or special issueScientificpeer-review

Abstract

In recent decades, urban policymakers have increasingly embraced the selling of naming rights as a means of generating revenue to construct and maintain urban infrastructure. The contemporary practice of toponymic commodification has its roots in the history of philanthropic gifting and the commercialization of professional sports, yet it has now become an integral part of the policy toolkit of neoliberal urbanism more generally. As a result, the naming of everything from sports arenas to public transit stations has come to be viewed as a sponsorship opportunity, yet such naming rights initiatives have not gone
uncontested.

This edited collection examines the political economy and cultural politics of urban place naming and considers how the commodification of naming rights is transforming the cultural landscapes of contemporary cities. Drawing upon case studies ranging from the selling of naming rights for sports arenas in European cities and metro stations in Dubai to the role of philanthropic naming in the “Facebookification” of San Francisco’s gentrifying neighborhoods, the contributions to this book draw attention to the diverse ways in which toponymic commodification is reshaping the identities of public places into time-limited, rent-generating commodities and the broader implications of these changes
on the production of urban space.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherRoutledge
Number of pages158
ISBN (Print)9780367756246
Publication statusPublished - 2021
MoE publication typeC2 Edited book

Fields of Science

  • 5142 Social policy
  • 519 Social and economic geography

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