Neurorestoration

Mikko Airavaara, Merja Voutilainen, Yun Wang, Barry Hoffer

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Although initially thought to be important primarily in neural development, a number of trophic proteins have been found to have neuroprotective and neuroregenerative activity in the adult central nervous system, particularly for midbrain dopamine neurons (MDN). Neurorestoration is potentially feasible for MDN since there is an initial loss of phenotype for these neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD) rather than neuronal death. There is a considerable recent literature on trophic properties of TGF-β superfamily proteins for MDN's, including glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), neurturin, and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). This paper will review studies with the factors listed above, as well as describe more recent studies with two newly described trophic proteins, MANF and CDNF. Data will be presented from various animal models of PD suggesting that these trophic proteins may eventually lead to PD therapeutics in man. In addition, some data on small molecules with neuroprotective properties (AP(4)A, retinoic acid and vitamin D(3)) will also be described.
Original languageEnglish
JournalParkinsonism & Related Disorders
Volume18
Issue numberSuppl. 1
Pages (from-to)S143-S146
Number of pages4
ISSN1353-8020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Jan 2012
MoE publication typeA2 Review article in a scientific journal

Cite this

Airavaara, Mikko ; Voutilainen, Merja ; Wang, Yun ; Hoffer, Barry . / Neurorestoration. In: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders. 2012 ; Vol. 18, No. Suppl. 1. pp. S143-S146.
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Neurorestoration. / Airavaara, Mikko; Voutilainen, Merja; Wang, Yun; Hoffer, Barry .

In: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, Vol. 18, No. Suppl. 1, 18.01.2012, p. S143-S146.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neurorestoration

AU - Airavaara, Mikko

AU - Voutilainen, Merja

AU - Wang, Yun

AU - Hoffer, Barry

PY - 2012/1/18

Y1 - 2012/1/18

N2 - Although initially thought to be important primarily in neural development, a number of trophic proteins have been found to have neuroprotective and neuroregenerative activity in the adult central nervous system, particularly for midbrain dopamine neurons (MDN). Neurorestoration is potentially feasible for MDN since there is an initial loss of phenotype for these neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD) rather than neuronal death. There is a considerable recent literature on trophic properties of TGF-β superfamily proteins for MDN's, including glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), neurturin, and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). This paper will review studies with the factors listed above, as well as describe more recent studies with two newly described trophic proteins, MANF and CDNF. Data will be presented from various animal models of PD suggesting that these trophic proteins may eventually lead to PD therapeutics in man. In addition, some data on small molecules with neuroprotective properties (AP(4)A, retinoic acid and vitamin D(3)) will also be described.

AB - Although initially thought to be important primarily in neural development, a number of trophic proteins have been found to have neuroprotective and neuroregenerative activity in the adult central nervous system, particularly for midbrain dopamine neurons (MDN). Neurorestoration is potentially feasible for MDN since there is an initial loss of phenotype for these neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD) rather than neuronal death. There is a considerable recent literature on trophic properties of TGF-β superfamily proteins for MDN's, including glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), neurturin, and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). This paper will review studies with the factors listed above, as well as describe more recent studies with two newly described trophic proteins, MANF and CDNF. Data will be presented from various animal models of PD suggesting that these trophic proteins may eventually lead to PD therapeutics in man. In addition, some data on small molecules with neuroprotective properties (AP(4)A, retinoic acid and vitamin D(3)) will also be described.

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