Noise sensitivity and multiple chemical sensitivity scales: Properties in a population based epidemiological study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the association of noise sensitivity with self-reported hearing disability and hearing levels, with consideration of the role of self-reported history of noise exposure and use of hearing protectors. The study is based on the Finnish Twin Cohort. In 1988, a noise questionnaire was sent to 1005 twin pairs, 1495 individuals (688 men, 807 women) replied. The age range was 31-88 years. Information on some potential confounders was obtained from the questionnaire in 1981 for the same individuals. A subsample of thirty-eight elderly women with noise sensitivity response from 1988 had audiometry data from 2000 to 2001. Noise sensitivity was associated with self-reported hearing disability among all subjects [odds ratio (OR) 1.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-2.12] and among women (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.19-3.04), but no-more significantly among men (OR 1.31, 95% CI 0.86-1.98). The association was primarily seen among younger subjects (50 years or less). The difference between noise sensitive and non-noise sensitive elderly women in the average of thresholds at frequencies of 0.5-4 kHz in the better ear was not significant (Pr = 0.18). Noise sensitivity did not modify the association of hearing disability with the self-reported history of occupational noise exposure. Noise sensitivity was associated with the use of hearing protectors at work. The study shows the importance of recognizing the noise sensitive in noise effect studies, since sensitivity in annoyance has implications in most of the effect categories.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNoise & Health
Volume14
Issue number60
Pages (from-to)215-223
Number of pages9
ISSN1463-1741
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health
  • general sensitivity
  • multiple chemical sensitivity
  • noise sensitivity
  • psychosocial factors
  • somatic health

Cite this

@article{ae0788eecc6a4e3db7f4e698e5da68d0,
title = "Noise sensitivity and multiple chemical sensitivity scales: Properties in a population based epidemiological study",
abstract = "The aim of this study was to investigate the association of noise sensitivity with self-reported hearing disability and hearing levels, with consideration of the role of self-reported history of noise exposure and use of hearing protectors. The study is based on the Finnish Twin Cohort. In 1988, a noise questionnaire was sent to 1005 twin pairs, 1495 individuals (688 men, 807 women) replied. The age range was 31-88 years. Information on some potential confounders was obtained from the questionnaire in 1981 for the same individuals. A subsample of thirty-eight elderly women with noise sensitivity response from 1988 had audiometry data from 2000 to 2001. Noise sensitivity was associated with self-reported hearing disability among all subjects [odds ratio (OR) 1.55, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 1.14-2.12] and among women (OR 1.90, 95{\%} CI 1.19-3.04), but no-more significantly among men (OR 1.31, 95{\%} CI 0.86-1.98). The association was primarily seen among younger subjects (50 years or less). The difference between noise sensitive and non-noise sensitive elderly women in the average of thresholds at frequencies of 0.5-4 kHz in the better ear was not significant (Pr = 0.18). Noise sensitivity did not modify the association of hearing disability with the self-reported history of occupational noise exposure. Noise sensitivity was associated with the use of hearing protectors at work. The study shows the importance of recognizing the noise sensitive in noise effect studies, since sensitivity in annoyance has implications in most of the effect categories.",
keywords = "3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health, general sensitivity, multiple chemical sensitivity, noise sensitivity, psychosocial factors, somatic health",
author = "Marja Heinonen-Guzejev and Markku Koskenvuo and Helena Mussalo-Rauhamaa and Vuorinen, {Heikki S} and Heikkil{\"a}, {Kauko Veli} and Jaakko Kaprio",
note = "WOS:000311610100001 Volume: Proceeding volume:",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.4103/1463-1741.102956",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "215--223",
journal = "Noise & Health",
issn = "1463-1741",
publisher = "Wolters Kluwer Medknow Publications",
number = "60",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Noise sensitivity and multiple chemical sensitivity scales: Properties in a population based epidemiological study

AU - Heinonen-Guzejev, Marja

AU - Koskenvuo, Markku

AU - Mussalo-Rauhamaa, Helena

AU - Vuorinen, Heikki S

AU - Heikkilä, Kauko Veli

AU - Kaprio, Jaakko

N1 - WOS:000311610100001 Volume: Proceeding volume:

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - The aim of this study was to investigate the association of noise sensitivity with self-reported hearing disability and hearing levels, with consideration of the role of self-reported history of noise exposure and use of hearing protectors. The study is based on the Finnish Twin Cohort. In 1988, a noise questionnaire was sent to 1005 twin pairs, 1495 individuals (688 men, 807 women) replied. The age range was 31-88 years. Information on some potential confounders was obtained from the questionnaire in 1981 for the same individuals. A subsample of thirty-eight elderly women with noise sensitivity response from 1988 had audiometry data from 2000 to 2001. Noise sensitivity was associated with self-reported hearing disability among all subjects [odds ratio (OR) 1.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-2.12] and among women (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.19-3.04), but no-more significantly among men (OR 1.31, 95% CI 0.86-1.98). The association was primarily seen among younger subjects (50 years or less). The difference between noise sensitive and non-noise sensitive elderly women in the average of thresholds at frequencies of 0.5-4 kHz in the better ear was not significant (Pr = 0.18). Noise sensitivity did not modify the association of hearing disability with the self-reported history of occupational noise exposure. Noise sensitivity was associated with the use of hearing protectors at work. The study shows the importance of recognizing the noise sensitive in noise effect studies, since sensitivity in annoyance has implications in most of the effect categories.

AB - The aim of this study was to investigate the association of noise sensitivity with self-reported hearing disability and hearing levels, with consideration of the role of self-reported history of noise exposure and use of hearing protectors. The study is based on the Finnish Twin Cohort. In 1988, a noise questionnaire was sent to 1005 twin pairs, 1495 individuals (688 men, 807 women) replied. The age range was 31-88 years. Information on some potential confounders was obtained from the questionnaire in 1981 for the same individuals. A subsample of thirty-eight elderly women with noise sensitivity response from 1988 had audiometry data from 2000 to 2001. Noise sensitivity was associated with self-reported hearing disability among all subjects [odds ratio (OR) 1.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-2.12] and among women (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.19-3.04), but no-more significantly among men (OR 1.31, 95% CI 0.86-1.98). The association was primarily seen among younger subjects (50 years or less). The difference between noise sensitive and non-noise sensitive elderly women in the average of thresholds at frequencies of 0.5-4 kHz in the better ear was not significant (Pr = 0.18). Noise sensitivity did not modify the association of hearing disability with the self-reported history of occupational noise exposure. Noise sensitivity was associated with the use of hearing protectors at work. The study shows the importance of recognizing the noise sensitive in noise effect studies, since sensitivity in annoyance has implications in most of the effect categories.

KW - 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health

KW - general sensitivity

KW - multiple chemical sensitivity

KW - noise sensitivity

KW - psychosocial factors

KW - somatic health

U2 - 10.4103/1463-1741.102956

DO - 10.4103/1463-1741.102956

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 215

EP - 223

JO - Noise & Health

JF - Noise & Health

SN - 1463-1741

IS - 60

ER -