Normalised Eating and Dietary Guidelines in LCHAD Deficiency

Malgorzata Rajtar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Dietary guidelines have become a ubiquitous feature of nutritional landscapes in a growing number of countries. Issued by departments or ministries of health and implemented by dietitians and health professionals, such guidelines are intended to govern the health of children and adults by regulating both the content and quantity of what they eat. While these dietary guidelines are intended for kids and adults who can and want to eat, they often serve as a reference point for the dietary treatment of patients whose appetites are considered abnormal, and/or who do not or cannot eat. Drawing from ethnographic research being carried out in Finland and Poland on LCHADD, a rare disease, this article juxtaposes dietary treatments prescribed for this disease with state and biomedical rationalities that govern “normal” dietary patterns and normalised eating. Treatment for LCHADD differs from general dietary recommendations for “normal” growing children. Despite stringent dietary guidelines for LCHADD, dietitians admit that there are no global standards in place regulating the consumption of prescribed nutrients; thus, recommendations may vary by country.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEthnologia Polona
Volume39
ISSN0137-4079
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 5143 Social anthropology
  • : dietary guidelines, standardisation, food, rare diseases. LCHADD, Finland, Poland

Cite this

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Normalised Eating and Dietary Guidelines in LCHAD Deficiency. / Rajtar, Malgorzata.

In: Ethnologia Polona, Vol. 39, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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