Obligatory female philopatry affects genetic population structure in the ant Proformica longiseta

Perttu Seppä, Ignacio Fernandez-Escudero, Niclas Gyllenstrand, Pekka Pamilo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Evolution of sociality has instigated many changes in the biology of social insects. Particularly, evolution towards complex social systems in ants affects how individuals move in space, usually by making females philopatric. Proformica longisetais well-suited for studying the effects of female philopatry, because female sexuals are wingless and do not actively disperse. We studied genetic population structure in P. longiseta in local scale both as genetic viscosity within one subpopulation, and as differentiation between closely (0.1-1.5 km) located subpopulations, by using nuclear (microsatellites) and mitochondrial (SSCP) markers. Dependent colony founding by splitting old nests is the only known nest founding strategy in P. longiseta. However, no genetic viscosity was detected at the nuclear markers within the subpopulation studied, possibly due to the dynamic nature of P. longiseta populations. The extreme female philopatry showed as strong structure between closely located subpopulations in the mitochondrial genome, but there was no isolation by distance showing that the differentiation pattern was random. Genetic structure in the nuclear genome was much weaker, and there was an indication of isolation by distance. This suggests that male dispersal is strong but not totally free across the area. Finally, non-dispersing P. longiseta females necessarily mate locally raising the possibility of inbreeding, but inbreeding coefficients showed that mating is random.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInsectes Sociaux
Volume53
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)362-368
Number of pages7
ISSN0020-1812
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology

Cite this

Seppä, Perttu ; Fernandez-Escudero, Ignacio ; Gyllenstrand, Niclas ; Pamilo, Pekka. / Obligatory female philopatry affects genetic population structure in the ant Proformica longiseta. In: Insectes Sociaux. 2006 ; Vol. 53, No. 3. pp. 362-368.
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abstract = "Evolution of sociality has instigated many changes in the biology of social insects. Particularly, evolution towards complex social systems in ants affects how individuals move in space, usually by making females philopatric. Proformica longisetais well-suited for studying the effects of female philopatry, because female sexuals are wingless and do not actively disperse. We studied genetic population structure in P. longiseta in local scale both as genetic viscosity within one subpopulation, and as differentiation between closely (0.1-1.5 km) located subpopulations, by using nuclear (microsatellites) and mitochondrial (SSCP) markers. Dependent colony founding by splitting old nests is the only known nest founding strategy in P. longiseta. However, no genetic viscosity was detected at the nuclear markers within the subpopulation studied, possibly due to the dynamic nature of P. longiseta populations. The extreme female philopatry showed as strong structure between closely located subpopulations in the mitochondrial genome, but there was no isolation by distance showing that the differentiation pattern was random. Genetic structure in the nuclear genome was much weaker, and there was an indication of isolation by distance. This suggests that male dispersal is strong but not totally free across the area. Finally, non-dispersing P. longiseta females necessarily mate locally raising the possibility of inbreeding, but inbreeding coefficients showed that mating is random.",
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Obligatory female philopatry affects genetic population structure in the ant Proformica longiseta. / Seppä, Perttu; Fernandez-Escudero, Ignacio; Gyllenstrand, Niclas; Pamilo, Pekka.

In: Insectes Sociaux, Vol. 53, No. 3, 2006, p. 362-368.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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T1 - Obligatory female philopatry affects genetic population structure in the ant Proformica longiseta

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PY - 2006

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N2 - Evolution of sociality has instigated many changes in the biology of social insects. Particularly, evolution towards complex social systems in ants affects how individuals move in space, usually by making females philopatric. Proformica longisetais well-suited for studying the effects of female philopatry, because female sexuals are wingless and do not actively disperse. We studied genetic population structure in P. longiseta in local scale both as genetic viscosity within one subpopulation, and as differentiation between closely (0.1-1.5 km) located subpopulations, by using nuclear (microsatellites) and mitochondrial (SSCP) markers. Dependent colony founding by splitting old nests is the only known nest founding strategy in P. longiseta. However, no genetic viscosity was detected at the nuclear markers within the subpopulation studied, possibly due to the dynamic nature of P. longiseta populations. The extreme female philopatry showed as strong structure between closely located subpopulations in the mitochondrial genome, but there was no isolation by distance showing that the differentiation pattern was random. Genetic structure in the nuclear genome was much weaker, and there was an indication of isolation by distance. This suggests that male dispersal is strong but not totally free across the area. Finally, non-dispersing P. longiseta females necessarily mate locally raising the possibility of inbreeding, but inbreeding coefficients showed that mating is random.

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