Population genetics and characterization of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from western jackdaws and game birds in Finland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Poultry are considered a major reservoir and source of human campylobacteriosis, but the roles of environmental reservoirs, including wild birds, have not been assessed in depth. In this study, we isolated and characterized Campylobacter jejuni from western jackdaws (n = 91, 43%), mallard ducks (n = 82, 76%), and pheasants (n = 9, 9%). Most of the western jackdaw and mallard duck C. jejuni isolates represented multilocus sequence typing (MLST) sequence types (STs) that diverged from those previously isolated from human patients and various animal species, whereas all pheasant isolates represented ST-19, a common ST among human patients and other hosts worldwide. Whole-genome MLST revealed that mallard duck ST-2314 and pheasant ST-19 isolates represented bacterial clones that were genetically highly similar to human isolates detected previously. Further analyses revealed that in addition to a divergent ClonalFrame genealogy, certain genomic characteristics of the western jackdaw C. jejuni isolates, e.g., a novel cdtABC gene cluster and the type VI secretion system (T6SS), may affect their host specificity and virulence. Game birds may thus pose a risk for acquiring campylobacteriosis; therefore, hygienic measures during slaughter and meat handling warrant special attention.

IMPORTANCE The roles of environmental reservoirs, including wild birds, in the molecular epidemiology of Campylobacter jejuni have not been assessed in depth. Our results showed that game birds may pose a risk for acquiring campylobacteriosis, because they had C. jejuni genomotypes highly similar to human isolates detected previously. Therefore, hygienic measures during slaughter and meat handling warrant special attention. On the contrary, a unique phylogeny was revealed for the western jackdaw isolates, and certain genomic characteristics identified among these isolates are hypothesized to affect their host specificity and virulence. Comparative genomics within sequence types (STs), using whole-genome multilocus sequence typing (wgMLST), and phylogenomics are efficient methods to analyze the genomic relationships of C. jejuni isolates.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberUNSP e02365-18
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume85
Issue number4
Number of pages16
ISSN0099-2240
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology
  • Campylobacter jejuni
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • comparative genomics
  • cytolethal distending toxin
  • mallard duck
  • pheasant
  • public health
  • western jackdaw
  • whole-genome sequencing
  • 416 Food Science
  • 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health
  • Campylobacter jejuni
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • comparative genomics
  • cytolethal distending toxin
  • mallard duck
  • pheasant
  • public health
  • western jackdaw
  • whole-genome sequencing
  • CYTOLETHAL DISTENDING TOXIN
  • MULTILOCUS SEQUENCE TYPES
  • ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE
  • ANNOTATION
  • VIRULENCE
  • HOST
  • IDENTIFICATION
  • COLONIZATION
  • TRANSMISSION
  • INFECTIONS

Cite this

@article{602b80f175a34371b7a888a4c58186d2,
title = "Population genetics and characterization of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from western jackdaws and game birds in Finland",
abstract = "Poultry are considered a major reservoir and source of human campylobacteriosis, but the roles of environmental reservoirs, including wild birds, have not been assessed in depth. In this study, we isolated and characterized Campylobacter jejuni from western jackdaws (n = 91, 43{\%}), mallard ducks (n = 82, 76{\%}), and pheasants (n = 9, 9{\%}). Most of the western jackdaw and mallard duck C. jejuni isolates represented multilocus sequence typing (MLST) sequence types (STs) that diverged from those previously isolated from human patients and various animal species, whereas all pheasant isolates represented ST-19, a common ST among human patients and other hosts worldwide. Whole-genome MLST revealed that mallard duck ST-2314 and pheasant ST-19 isolates represented bacterial clones that were genetically highly similar to human isolates detected previously. Further analyses revealed that in addition to a divergent ClonalFrame genealogy, certain genomic characteristics of the western jackdaw C. jejuni isolates, e.g., a novel cdtABC gene cluster and the type VI secretion system (T6SS), may affect their host specificity and virulence. Game birds may thus pose a risk for acquiring campylobacteriosis; therefore, hygienic measures during slaughter and meat handling warrant special attention.IMPORTANCE The roles of environmental reservoirs, including wild birds, in the molecular epidemiology of Campylobacter jejuni have not been assessed in depth. Our results showed that game birds may pose a risk for acquiring campylobacteriosis, because they had C. jejuni genomotypes highly similar to human isolates detected previously. Therefore, hygienic measures during slaughter and meat handling warrant special attention. On the contrary, a unique phylogeny was revealed for the western jackdaw isolates, and certain genomic characteristics identified among these isolates are hypothesized to affect their host specificity and virulence. Comparative genomics within sequence types (STs), using whole-genome multilocus sequence typing (wgMLST), and phylogenomics are efficient methods to analyze the genomic relationships of C. jejuni isolates.",
keywords = "1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology, Campylobacter jejuni, antimicrobial resistance, comparative genomics, cytolethal distending toxin, mallard duck, pheasant, public health, western jackdaw, whole-genome sequencing, 416 Food Science, 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health, Campylobacter jejuni, antimicrobial resistance, comparative genomics, cytolethal distending toxin, mallard duck, pheasant, public health, western jackdaw, whole-genome sequencing, CYTOLETHAL DISTENDING TOXIN, MULTILOCUS SEQUENCE TYPES, ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE, ANNOTATION, VIRULENCE, HOST, IDENTIFICATION, COLONIZATION, TRANSMISSION, INFECTIONS",
author = "Sara Kovanen and Mirko Rossi and Mari Pohja-Mykr{\"a} and Timo Nieminen and Mirja Raunio-Saarnisto and Mikaela Sauvala and Maria Fredriksson-Ahomaa and Marja-Liisa H{\"a}nninen and Kivist{\"o}, {Rauni Inari}",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1128/AEM.02365-18",
language = "English",
volume = "85",
journal = "Applied and Environmental Microbiology",
issn = "0099-2240",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "4",

}

Population genetics and characterization of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from western jackdaws and game birds in Finland. / Kovanen, Sara ; Rossi, Mirko; Pohja-Mykrä, Mari ; Nieminen, Timo ; Raunio-Saarnisto, Mirja; Sauvala, Mikaela ; Fredriksson-Ahomaa, Maria ; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa; Kivistö, Rauni Inari.

In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 85, No. 4, UNSP e02365-18, 02.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Population genetics and characterization of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from western jackdaws and game birds in Finland

AU - Kovanen, Sara

AU - Rossi, Mirko

AU - Pohja-Mykrä, Mari

AU - Nieminen, Timo

AU - Raunio-Saarnisto, Mirja

AU - Sauvala, Mikaela

AU - Fredriksson-Ahomaa, Maria

AU - Hänninen, Marja-Liisa

AU - Kivistö, Rauni Inari

PY - 2019/2

Y1 - 2019/2

N2 - Poultry are considered a major reservoir and source of human campylobacteriosis, but the roles of environmental reservoirs, including wild birds, have not been assessed in depth. In this study, we isolated and characterized Campylobacter jejuni from western jackdaws (n = 91, 43%), mallard ducks (n = 82, 76%), and pheasants (n = 9, 9%). Most of the western jackdaw and mallard duck C. jejuni isolates represented multilocus sequence typing (MLST) sequence types (STs) that diverged from those previously isolated from human patients and various animal species, whereas all pheasant isolates represented ST-19, a common ST among human patients and other hosts worldwide. Whole-genome MLST revealed that mallard duck ST-2314 and pheasant ST-19 isolates represented bacterial clones that were genetically highly similar to human isolates detected previously. Further analyses revealed that in addition to a divergent ClonalFrame genealogy, certain genomic characteristics of the western jackdaw C. jejuni isolates, e.g., a novel cdtABC gene cluster and the type VI secretion system (T6SS), may affect their host specificity and virulence. Game birds may thus pose a risk for acquiring campylobacteriosis; therefore, hygienic measures during slaughter and meat handling warrant special attention.IMPORTANCE The roles of environmental reservoirs, including wild birds, in the molecular epidemiology of Campylobacter jejuni have not been assessed in depth. Our results showed that game birds may pose a risk for acquiring campylobacteriosis, because they had C. jejuni genomotypes highly similar to human isolates detected previously. Therefore, hygienic measures during slaughter and meat handling warrant special attention. On the contrary, a unique phylogeny was revealed for the western jackdaw isolates, and certain genomic characteristics identified among these isolates are hypothesized to affect their host specificity and virulence. Comparative genomics within sequence types (STs), using whole-genome multilocus sequence typing (wgMLST), and phylogenomics are efficient methods to analyze the genomic relationships of C. jejuni isolates.

AB - Poultry are considered a major reservoir and source of human campylobacteriosis, but the roles of environmental reservoirs, including wild birds, have not been assessed in depth. In this study, we isolated and characterized Campylobacter jejuni from western jackdaws (n = 91, 43%), mallard ducks (n = 82, 76%), and pheasants (n = 9, 9%). Most of the western jackdaw and mallard duck C. jejuni isolates represented multilocus sequence typing (MLST) sequence types (STs) that diverged from those previously isolated from human patients and various animal species, whereas all pheasant isolates represented ST-19, a common ST among human patients and other hosts worldwide. Whole-genome MLST revealed that mallard duck ST-2314 and pheasant ST-19 isolates represented bacterial clones that were genetically highly similar to human isolates detected previously. Further analyses revealed that in addition to a divergent ClonalFrame genealogy, certain genomic characteristics of the western jackdaw C. jejuni isolates, e.g., a novel cdtABC gene cluster and the type VI secretion system (T6SS), may affect their host specificity and virulence. Game birds may thus pose a risk for acquiring campylobacteriosis; therefore, hygienic measures during slaughter and meat handling warrant special attention.IMPORTANCE The roles of environmental reservoirs, including wild birds, in the molecular epidemiology of Campylobacter jejuni have not been assessed in depth. Our results showed that game birds may pose a risk for acquiring campylobacteriosis, because they had C. jejuni genomotypes highly similar to human isolates detected previously. Therefore, hygienic measures during slaughter and meat handling warrant special attention. On the contrary, a unique phylogeny was revealed for the western jackdaw isolates, and certain genomic characteristics identified among these isolates are hypothesized to affect their host specificity and virulence. Comparative genomics within sequence types (STs), using whole-genome multilocus sequence typing (wgMLST), and phylogenomics are efficient methods to analyze the genomic relationships of C. jejuni isolates.

KW - 1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology

KW - Campylobacter jejuni

KW - antimicrobial resistance

KW - comparative genomics

KW - cytolethal distending toxin

KW - mallard duck

KW - pheasant

KW - public health

KW - western jackdaw

KW - whole-genome sequencing

KW - 416 Food Science

KW - 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health

KW - Campylobacter jejuni

KW - antimicrobial resistance

KW - comparative genomics

KW - cytolethal distending toxin

KW - mallard duck

KW - pheasant

KW - public health

KW - western jackdaw

KW - whole-genome sequencing

KW - CYTOLETHAL DISTENDING TOXIN

KW - MULTILOCUS SEQUENCE TYPES

KW - ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE

KW - ANNOTATION

KW - VIRULENCE

KW - HOST

KW - IDENTIFICATION

KW - COLONIZATION

KW - TRANSMISSION

KW - INFECTIONS

U2 - 10.1128/AEM.02365-18

DO - 10.1128/AEM.02365-18

M3 - Article

VL - 85

JO - Applied and Environmental Microbiology

JF - Applied and Environmental Microbiology

SN - 0099-2240

IS - 4

M1 - UNSP e02365-18

ER -