Population genetics of the black ant Formica lemani (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Colony kin structure and spatial population structure were studied in multiple populations of the ant Formica lemani, using allozymes and DNA microsatellites. Average genetic relatedness between nestmate workers varied little between populations (r = 0.51-0.76), indicating that the average colony kin structure was relatively simple. Worker genotypes could not be explained with a single breeding pair in all nests, however, and the distribution of relatedness estimates across nests was bimodal, suggesting that single- and multi-queen colonies co-occur. We studied spatial population structure in a successional boreal forest system, which is a mixture of different aged habitats. Newly clear-cut open habitat patches are quickly colonized by F. lemani, where it is able to persist for a limited number of generations. Newly-founded populations showed signs of a founder effect and spatial substructuring, whereas older populations were more homogenous. This suggests that new populations are founded by a limited number of colonizers arriving from more than one source. Genetic differentiation among local populations was minor, indicating strong migration between them. There were, however, indications of both isolation by distance and populations becoming more isolated as habitat patches grew older. (C) 2009 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2009, 97, 247-258.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBiological journal of the Linnean Society
Volume97
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)247-258
Number of pages12
ISSN0024-4066
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology

Cite this

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title = "Population genetics of the black ant Formica lemani (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)",
abstract = "Colony kin structure and spatial population structure were studied in multiple populations of the ant Formica lemani, using allozymes and DNA microsatellites. Average genetic relatedness between nestmate workers varied little between populations (r = 0.51-0.76), indicating that the average colony kin structure was relatively simple. Worker genotypes could not be explained with a single breeding pair in all nests, however, and the distribution of relatedness estimates across nests was bimodal, suggesting that single- and multi-queen colonies co-occur. We studied spatial population structure in a successional boreal forest system, which is a mixture of different aged habitats. Newly clear-cut open habitat patches are quickly colonized by F. lemani, where it is able to persist for a limited number of generations. Newly-founded populations showed signs of a founder effect and spatial substructuring, whereas older populations were more homogenous. This suggests that new populations are founded by a limited number of colonizers arriving from more than one source. Genetic differentiation among local populations was minor, indicating strong migration between them. There were, however, indications of both isolation by distance and populations becoming more isolated as habitat patches grew older. (C) 2009 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2009, 97, 247-258.",
keywords = "1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology",
author = "Perttu Sepp{\"a} and Heikki Helanter{\"a} and Anton Chernenko and Kalevi Trontti and Pekka Punttila and Liselotte Sundstr{\"o}m",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1111/j.1095-8312.2009.01192.x",
language = "English",
volume = "97",
pages = "247--258",
journal = "Biological journal of the Linnean Society",
issn = "0024-4066",
publisher = "Wiley/Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

Population genetics of the black ant Formica lemani (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). / Seppä, Perttu; Helanterä, Heikki; Chernenko, Anton; Trontti, Kalevi; Punttila, Pekka; Sundström, Liselotte.

In: Biological journal of the Linnean Society, Vol. 97, No. 2, 2009, p. 247-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Population genetics of the black ant Formica lemani (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

AU - Seppä, Perttu

AU - Helanterä, Heikki

AU - Chernenko, Anton

AU - Trontti, Kalevi

AU - Punttila, Pekka

AU - Sundström, Liselotte

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Colony kin structure and spatial population structure were studied in multiple populations of the ant Formica lemani, using allozymes and DNA microsatellites. Average genetic relatedness between nestmate workers varied little between populations (r = 0.51-0.76), indicating that the average colony kin structure was relatively simple. Worker genotypes could not be explained with a single breeding pair in all nests, however, and the distribution of relatedness estimates across nests was bimodal, suggesting that single- and multi-queen colonies co-occur. We studied spatial population structure in a successional boreal forest system, which is a mixture of different aged habitats. Newly clear-cut open habitat patches are quickly colonized by F. lemani, where it is able to persist for a limited number of generations. Newly-founded populations showed signs of a founder effect and spatial substructuring, whereas older populations were more homogenous. This suggests that new populations are founded by a limited number of colonizers arriving from more than one source. Genetic differentiation among local populations was minor, indicating strong migration between them. There were, however, indications of both isolation by distance and populations becoming more isolated as habitat patches grew older. (C) 2009 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2009, 97, 247-258.

AB - Colony kin structure and spatial population structure were studied in multiple populations of the ant Formica lemani, using allozymes and DNA microsatellites. Average genetic relatedness between nestmate workers varied little between populations (r = 0.51-0.76), indicating that the average colony kin structure was relatively simple. Worker genotypes could not be explained with a single breeding pair in all nests, however, and the distribution of relatedness estimates across nests was bimodal, suggesting that single- and multi-queen colonies co-occur. We studied spatial population structure in a successional boreal forest system, which is a mixture of different aged habitats. Newly clear-cut open habitat patches are quickly colonized by F. lemani, where it is able to persist for a limited number of generations. Newly-founded populations showed signs of a founder effect and spatial substructuring, whereas older populations were more homogenous. This suggests that new populations are founded by a limited number of colonizers arriving from more than one source. Genetic differentiation among local populations was minor, indicating strong migration between them. There were, however, indications of both isolation by distance and populations becoming more isolated as habitat patches grew older. (C) 2009 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2009, 97, 247-258.

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