Rehabilitation of degraded dryland ecosystems – review

Research output: Contribution to journalReview Articlepeer-review

Abstract

Land degradation is widespread and a serious threat affecting the livelihoods of 1.5 billion people worldwide of which one sixth or 250 million people reside in drylands. Globally, it is estimated that 10–20% of drylands are already degraded and about 12 million ha are degraded each year. Driven by unsustainable land use practices, adverse climatic conditions and population increase, land degradation has led to decline in provision of ecosystem services, food insecurity, social and political instability and reduction in the ecosystem’s resilience to natural climate variability. Several global initiatives have been launched to combat land degradation, including rehabilitation of degraded drylands. This review aimed at collating the current state-of-knowledge about rehabilitation of degraded drylands. It was found that the prospect of restoring degraded drylands is technically promising using a suite of passive (e.g. area exclosure, assisted natural regeneration, rotational grazing) and active (e.g. mixed-species planting, framework species, maximum
diversity, and use of nurse tree) rehabilitation measures. Advances in soil reclamation using biological, chemical and physical measures have been made. Despite technical advances, the scale of rehabilitation intervention is small and lacks holistic approach. Development of process based models that forecast outcomes of the various rehabilitation activities will be useful tools for researchers and practitioners. The concept of forest landscape restoration approach, which operates at landscape-level, could also be adopted as the overarching framework for rehabilitation
of degraded dryland ecosystems. The review identified a data gap in cost-benefit analysis of rehabilitation interventions. However, the cost of rehabilitation and sustainable management of drylands is opined to be lower than the losses that accrue from inaction, depending on the degree
of degradation. Thus, local communities’ participation, incorporation of traditional ecological knowledge, clear division of tasks and benefits, strengthening local institutions are crucial not only for cost-sharing, but also for the long-term success of rehabilitation activities.
Original languageEnglish
Article number1673
JournalSilva Fennica
Volume51
Issue number1b
Number of pages32
ISSN0037-5330
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
MoE publication typeA2 Review article in a scientific journal

Fields of Science

  • 4112 Forestry
  • land degradation
  • Desertification
  • rangelands
  • croplands
  • dry forest
  • landscapes
  • Restoration
  • TROPICAL DRY FORESTS
  • NEW-SOUTH-WALES
  • CYANOBACTERIAL SOIL CRUSTS
  • ROSS RIVER VIRUS
  • LAND DEGRADATION
  • WESTERN-AUSTRALIA
  • RANGELAND DEGRADATION
  • CLIMATE-CHANGE
  • GLOBAL CHANGE
  • ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION

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