Retention of phosphorus in soil and vegetation of a buffer zone area during snowmelt peak flow in southern Finland

Riitta Väänänen, Mika Nieminen, Martti Vuollekoski, Hannu Ilvesniemi

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    Abstract

    In regions with a distinct winter-period, nearly half of the annual runoff occurs during a short snow-melt period early in spring. During this time functioning buffer zones are important means of preventing the leaching of phosphorus from forest land into downstream watercourses. Sparse vegetation restricts biological P accumulation and high flows reduce the capacity of deeper soil layers to adsorb P, indicating that the effectiveness of buffer zones may be low. Our aim was to increase the understanding of phosphorus retention in a buffer zone area under such unfavourable conditions for P removal, and to estimate the amount of P sorbed by soil and taken up by vascular plants and mosses. Over a five-day period in spring we added 10 kg (60 kg ha(-1)) of PO4-P and 185 MBq (1100 MBq ha(-1)) P-32 to a 25-50 m wide buffer zone area (0.17 ha) in southern Finland. We measured the total P retention and recovery during ten days after the beginning of the experiment. Recovery of P-32 was 16% of added P, of which 90% was in soil, 3% in vascular plants and 5% in mosses. Thus, our results showed that the total P retention was low, most likely because the water flow did not slow down sufficiently and penetrate deeply enough to enable a close contact between P in the runoff and the soil matrix. Most of the recovered P was in the soil suggesting that adsorption by soil was the most important sink for P under early spring high flow conditions.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalWater, Air and Soil Pollution
    Volume177
    Pages (from-to)103-118
    Number of pages16
    ISSN0049-6979
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006
    MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

    Fields of Science

    • 411 Agriculture and forestry

    Cite this

    @article{91ca953a953847a287ec8036566f6d1a,
    title = "Retention of phosphorus in soil and vegetation of a buffer zone area during snowmelt peak flow in southern Finland",
    abstract = "In regions with a distinct winter-period, nearly half of the annual runoff occurs during a short snow-melt period early in spring. During this time functioning buffer zones are important means of preventing the leaching of phosphorus from forest land into downstream watercourses. Sparse vegetation restricts biological P accumulation and high flows reduce the capacity of deeper soil layers to adsorb P, indicating that the effectiveness of buffer zones may be low. Our aim was to increase the understanding of phosphorus retention in a buffer zone area under such unfavourable conditions for P removal, and to estimate the amount of P sorbed by soil and taken up by vascular plants and mosses. Over a five-day period in spring we added 10 kg (60 kg ha(-1)) of PO4-P and 185 MBq (1100 MBq ha(-1)) P-32 to a 25-50 m wide buffer zone area (0.17 ha) in southern Finland. We measured the total P retention and recovery during ten days after the beginning of the experiment. Recovery of P-32 was 16{\%} of added P, of which 90{\%} was in soil, 3{\%} in vascular plants and 5{\%} in mosses. Thus, our results showed that the total P retention was low, most likely because the water flow did not slow down sufficiently and penetrate deeply enough to enable a close contact between P in the runoff and the soil matrix. Most of the recovered P was in the soil suggesting that adsorption by soil was the most important sink for P under early spring high flow conditions.",
    keywords = "411 Agriculture and forestry",
    author = "Riitta V{\"a}{\"a}n{\"a}nen and Mika Nieminen and Martti Vuollekoski and Hannu Ilvesniemi",
    year = "2006",
    doi = "10.1007/s11270-006-9106-1",
    language = "English",
    volume = "177",
    pages = "103--118",
    journal = "Water, Air and Soil Pollution",
    issn = "0049-6979",
    publisher = "Springer",

    }

    Retention of phosphorus in soil and vegetation of a buffer zone area during snowmelt peak flow in southern Finland. / Väänänen, Riitta; Nieminen, Mika; Vuollekoski, Martti; Ilvesniemi, Hannu.

    In: Water, Air and Soil Pollution, Vol. 177, 2006, p. 103-118.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Retention of phosphorus in soil and vegetation of a buffer zone area during snowmelt peak flow in southern Finland

    AU - Väänänen, Riitta

    AU - Nieminen, Mika

    AU - Vuollekoski, Martti

    AU - Ilvesniemi, Hannu

    PY - 2006

    Y1 - 2006

    N2 - In regions with a distinct winter-period, nearly half of the annual runoff occurs during a short snow-melt period early in spring. During this time functioning buffer zones are important means of preventing the leaching of phosphorus from forest land into downstream watercourses. Sparse vegetation restricts biological P accumulation and high flows reduce the capacity of deeper soil layers to adsorb P, indicating that the effectiveness of buffer zones may be low. Our aim was to increase the understanding of phosphorus retention in a buffer zone area under such unfavourable conditions for P removal, and to estimate the amount of P sorbed by soil and taken up by vascular plants and mosses. Over a five-day period in spring we added 10 kg (60 kg ha(-1)) of PO4-P and 185 MBq (1100 MBq ha(-1)) P-32 to a 25-50 m wide buffer zone area (0.17 ha) in southern Finland. We measured the total P retention and recovery during ten days after the beginning of the experiment. Recovery of P-32 was 16% of added P, of which 90% was in soil, 3% in vascular plants and 5% in mosses. Thus, our results showed that the total P retention was low, most likely because the water flow did not slow down sufficiently and penetrate deeply enough to enable a close contact between P in the runoff and the soil matrix. Most of the recovered P was in the soil suggesting that adsorption by soil was the most important sink for P under early spring high flow conditions.

    AB - In regions with a distinct winter-period, nearly half of the annual runoff occurs during a short snow-melt period early in spring. During this time functioning buffer zones are important means of preventing the leaching of phosphorus from forest land into downstream watercourses. Sparse vegetation restricts biological P accumulation and high flows reduce the capacity of deeper soil layers to adsorb P, indicating that the effectiveness of buffer zones may be low. Our aim was to increase the understanding of phosphorus retention in a buffer zone area under such unfavourable conditions for P removal, and to estimate the amount of P sorbed by soil and taken up by vascular plants and mosses. Over a five-day period in spring we added 10 kg (60 kg ha(-1)) of PO4-P and 185 MBq (1100 MBq ha(-1)) P-32 to a 25-50 m wide buffer zone area (0.17 ha) in southern Finland. We measured the total P retention and recovery during ten days after the beginning of the experiment. Recovery of P-32 was 16% of added P, of which 90% was in soil, 3% in vascular plants and 5% in mosses. Thus, our results showed that the total P retention was low, most likely because the water flow did not slow down sufficiently and penetrate deeply enough to enable a close contact between P in the runoff and the soil matrix. Most of the recovered P was in the soil suggesting that adsorption by soil was the most important sink for P under early spring high flow conditions.

    KW - 411 Agriculture and forestry

    U2 - 10.1007/s11270-006-9106-1

    DO - 10.1007/s11270-006-9106-1

    M3 - Article

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    SP - 103

    EP - 118

    JO - Water, Air and Soil Pollution

    JF - Water, Air and Soil Pollution

    SN - 0049-6979

    ER -