Russia’s Minority Education and the European Language Charter

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterScientificpeer-review

Abstract

A crucial question for the linguistic diversity of the world is how the different national and international frameworks that are aimed at supporting and maintaining linguistic diversity fulfil their purpose. This chapter evaluates the provision of minority language education in Russia from the perspective of Article 8 of the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. In order to do this, the chapter will first outline expert work, which prepared a ‘simulation’ of the Charter’s application in Russia. After this, the chapter will analyse the data on the provision of language teaching according to the legislation of the Finno-Ugric republics. Finally, the chapter will discuss the data matching them with possible undertakings under the Charter and will pinpoint the impact of the education reform on the position of minority languages. The chapter demonstrates that the education reform had a negative impact on the position of languages in education that can be assessed also in terms of the Charter. Thus, the question is raised as to whether the simulation of the Charter’s application has been useful from the point of view of fostering linguistic diversity in Russia. Further, it is demonstrated that the fate of the minority languages in Russia is primarily not dependent on the law and international agreements, but on the regional strength of the minority elites. This is reflected in the fact that in the politically and economically strong republics with dominant titular groups (Tatarstan, Bashkortostan), the minorities have a better protection standard than in their titular republics. This demonstrates that diversity supports increased diversity.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLinguistic Genocide or Superdiversity? : New and Old Language Diversities
EditorsJanne Saarikivi, Reetta Toivanen
Number of pages35
Place of PublicationBristol
PublisherMultilingual matters
Publication date2016
Pages249-283
Article number9th
ISBN (Print)9781783096053
ISBN (Electronic)9781783096077, 9781783096060
Publication statusPublished - 2016
MoE publication typeA3 Book chapter

Publication series

NameLinguistic Diversity and Language Rights
Volume14

Fields of Science

  • 513 Law
  • minority language education
  • state languages of republics
  • Finno-Ugric republics
  • Russian Federation
  • European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages

Cite this

Zamyatin, K. (2016). Russia’s Minority Education and the European Language Charter. In J. Saarikivi, & R. Toivanen (Eds.), Linguistic Genocide or Superdiversity? : New and Old Language Diversities (pp. 249-283). [9th] (Linguistic Diversity and Language Rights ; Vol. 14). Bristol: Multilingual matters.
Zamyatin, Konstantin. / Russia’s Minority Education and the European Language Charter. Linguistic Genocide or Superdiversity? : New and Old Language Diversities. editor / Janne Saarikivi ; Reetta Toivanen. Bristol : Multilingual matters, 2016. pp. 249-283 (Linguistic Diversity and Language Rights ).
@inbook{646474085ea4470ab6061292afb96ab7,
title = "Russia’s Minority Education and the European Language Charter",
abstract = "A crucial question for the linguistic diversity of the world is how the different national and international frameworks that are aimed at supporting and maintaining linguistic diversity fulfil their purpose. This chapter evaluates the provision of minority language education in Russia from the perspective of Article 8 of the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. In order to do this, the chapter will first outline expert work, which prepared a ‘simulation’ of the Charter’s application in Russia. After this, the chapter will analyse the data on the provision of language teaching according to the legislation of the Finno-Ugric republics. Finally, the chapter will discuss the data matching them with possible undertakings under the Charter and will pinpoint the impact of the education reform on the position of minority languages. The chapter demonstrates that the education reform had a negative impact on the position of languages in education that can be assessed also in terms of the Charter. Thus, the question is raised as to whether the simulation of the Charter’s application has been useful from the point of view of fostering linguistic diversity in Russia. Further, it is demonstrated that the fate of the minority languages in Russia is primarily not dependent on the law and international agreements, but on the regional strength of the minority elites. This is reflected in the fact that in the politically and economically strong republics with dominant titular groups (Tatarstan, Bashkortostan), the minorities have a better protection standard than in their titular republics. This demonstrates that diversity supports increased diversity.",
keywords = "513 Law, minority language education, state languages of republics, Finno-Ugric republics, Russian Federation, European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages",
author = "Konstantin Zamyatin",
year = "2016",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781783096053",
series = "Linguistic Diversity and Language Rights",
publisher = "Multilingual matters",
pages = "249--283",
editor = "Janne Saarikivi and Reetta Toivanen",
booktitle = "Linguistic Genocide or Superdiversity?",
address = "United Kingdom",

}

Zamyatin, K 2016, Russia’s Minority Education and the European Language Charter. in J Saarikivi & R Toivanen (eds), Linguistic Genocide or Superdiversity? : New and Old Language Diversities., 9th, Linguistic Diversity and Language Rights , vol. 14, Multilingual matters, Bristol, pp. 249-283.

Russia’s Minority Education and the European Language Charter. / Zamyatin, Konstantin.

Linguistic Genocide or Superdiversity? : New and Old Language Diversities. ed. / Janne Saarikivi; Reetta Toivanen. Bristol : Multilingual matters, 2016. p. 249-283 9th (Linguistic Diversity and Language Rights ; Vol. 14).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterScientificpeer-review

TY - CHAP

T1 - Russia’s Minority Education and the European Language Charter

AU - Zamyatin, Konstantin

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - A crucial question for the linguistic diversity of the world is how the different national and international frameworks that are aimed at supporting and maintaining linguistic diversity fulfil their purpose. This chapter evaluates the provision of minority language education in Russia from the perspective of Article 8 of the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. In order to do this, the chapter will first outline expert work, which prepared a ‘simulation’ of the Charter’s application in Russia. After this, the chapter will analyse the data on the provision of language teaching according to the legislation of the Finno-Ugric republics. Finally, the chapter will discuss the data matching them with possible undertakings under the Charter and will pinpoint the impact of the education reform on the position of minority languages. The chapter demonstrates that the education reform had a negative impact on the position of languages in education that can be assessed also in terms of the Charter. Thus, the question is raised as to whether the simulation of the Charter’s application has been useful from the point of view of fostering linguistic diversity in Russia. Further, it is demonstrated that the fate of the minority languages in Russia is primarily not dependent on the law and international agreements, but on the regional strength of the minority elites. This is reflected in the fact that in the politically and economically strong republics with dominant titular groups (Tatarstan, Bashkortostan), the minorities have a better protection standard than in their titular republics. This demonstrates that diversity supports increased diversity.

AB - A crucial question for the linguistic diversity of the world is how the different national and international frameworks that are aimed at supporting and maintaining linguistic diversity fulfil their purpose. This chapter evaluates the provision of minority language education in Russia from the perspective of Article 8 of the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. In order to do this, the chapter will first outline expert work, which prepared a ‘simulation’ of the Charter’s application in Russia. After this, the chapter will analyse the data on the provision of language teaching according to the legislation of the Finno-Ugric republics. Finally, the chapter will discuss the data matching them with possible undertakings under the Charter and will pinpoint the impact of the education reform on the position of minority languages. The chapter demonstrates that the education reform had a negative impact on the position of languages in education that can be assessed also in terms of the Charter. Thus, the question is raised as to whether the simulation of the Charter’s application has been useful from the point of view of fostering linguistic diversity in Russia. Further, it is demonstrated that the fate of the minority languages in Russia is primarily not dependent on the law and international agreements, but on the regional strength of the minority elites. This is reflected in the fact that in the politically and economically strong republics with dominant titular groups (Tatarstan, Bashkortostan), the minorities have a better protection standard than in their titular republics. This demonstrates that diversity supports increased diversity.

KW - 513 Law

KW - minority language education

KW - state languages of republics

KW - Finno-Ugric republics

KW - Russian Federation

KW - European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9781783096053

T3 - Linguistic Diversity and Language Rights

SP - 249

EP - 283

BT - Linguistic Genocide or Superdiversity?

A2 - Saarikivi, Janne

A2 - Toivanen, Reetta

PB - Multilingual matters

CY - Bristol

ER -

Zamyatin K. Russia’s Minority Education and the European Language Charter. In Saarikivi J, Toivanen R, editors, Linguistic Genocide or Superdiversity? : New and Old Language Diversities. Bristol: Multilingual matters. 2016. p. 249-283. 9th. (Linguistic Diversity and Language Rights ).