Singing for rehabilitation: Efficacy of singing-based interventions in major ageing-related neurological disorders

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Singing is a versatile form of communication that engages a large-scale bilateral network of cortical and subcortical brain regions associated with auditory, cognitive, motor, emotional, and social functions. In many ageing-related neurological disorders singing can be highly rewarding and motivating, and can provide a valuable rehabilitation tool. This chapter reviews recent research on the neural basis of singing and the clinical efficacy of singing-based interventions in the rehabilitation of aphasia, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRoutledge Companion to Interdisciplinary Studies in Singing, Volume III : Wellbeing
EditorsRachel Heydon, Daisy Fancourt, Annabel J. Cohen
Number of pages11
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherRoutledge
Publication dateJun 2020
Pages98-108
ISBN (Print)978-1-138-06122-4
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-315-16254-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2020
MoE publication typeA3 Book chapter

Fields of Science

  • 515 Psychology
  • 6131 Theatre, dance, music, other performing arts
  • 3124 Neurology and psychiatry
  • 3112 Neurosciences

Cite this

Särkämö, T. (2020). Singing for rehabilitation: Efficacy of singing-based interventions in major ageing-related neurological disorders. In R. Heydon, D. Fancourt, & A. J. Cohen (Eds.), Routledge Companion to Interdisciplinary Studies in Singing, Volume III: Wellbeing (pp. 98-108). New York: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315162546-8