SNP discovery by mismatch-targeting of Mu transposition

Luisa Orsini, Maria Pajunen, Ilkka Hanski, Harri Savilahti

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    Abstract

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) represent a valuable resource for the mapping of human disease genes and induced mutations in model organisms. SNPs may become the markers of choice also for population ecology and evolutionary studies, but their isolation for non-model organisms with unsequenced genomes is often difficult. Here, we describe a rapid and cost-effective strategy to isolate SNPs that exploits the property of the bacteriophage Mu transposition machinery to target mismatched DNA sites and thereby to effectively detect polymorphic loci. To demonstrate the methodology, we isolated 164 SNPs from the unsequenced genome of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia), a much-studied species in population biology, and we validated 24 of them. The strategy involves standard molecular biology techniques as well as undemanding MuA transposase-catalyzed in vitro transposition reactions, and it is applicable to any organism.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalNucleic Acids Research
    Volume35
    Issue number6, s
    ISSN0305-1048
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2007
    MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

    Cite this

    Orsini, Luisa ; Pajunen, Maria ; Hanski, Ilkka ; Savilahti, Harri. / SNP discovery by mismatch-targeting of Mu transposition. In: Nucleic Acids Research. 2007 ; Vol. 35, No. 6, s.
    @article{137efb64bb9f4c16b0c10aa2bdfc168a,
    title = "SNP discovery by mismatch-targeting of Mu transposition",
    abstract = "Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) represent a valuable resource for the mapping of human disease genes and induced mutations in model organisms. SNPs may become the markers of choice also for population ecology and evolutionary studies, but their isolation for non-model organisms with unsequenced genomes is often difficult. Here, we describe a rapid and cost-effective strategy to isolate SNPs that exploits the property of the bacteriophage Mu transposition machinery to target mismatched DNA sites and thereby to effectively detect polymorphic loci. To demonstrate the methodology, we isolated 164 SNPs from the unsequenced genome of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia), a much-studied species in population biology, and we validated 24 of them. The strategy involves standard molecular biology techniques as well as undemanding MuA transposase-catalyzed in vitro transposition reactions, and it is applicable to any organism.",
    author = "Luisa Orsini and Maria Pajunen and Ilkka Hanski and Harri Savilahti",
    year = "2007",
    doi = "10.1093/nar/gkm070",
    language = "English",
    volume = "35",
    journal = "Nucleic Acids Research",
    issn = "0305-1048",
    publisher = "Oxford University Press",
    number = "6, s",

    }

    SNP discovery by mismatch-targeting of Mu transposition. / Orsini, Luisa; Pajunen, Maria; Hanski, Ilkka; Savilahti, Harri.

    In: Nucleic Acids Research, Vol. 35, No. 6, s, 2007.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - SNP discovery by mismatch-targeting of Mu transposition

    AU - Orsini, Luisa

    AU - Pajunen, Maria

    AU - Hanski, Ilkka

    AU - Savilahti, Harri

    PY - 2007

    Y1 - 2007

    N2 - Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) represent a valuable resource for the mapping of human disease genes and induced mutations in model organisms. SNPs may become the markers of choice also for population ecology and evolutionary studies, but their isolation for non-model organisms with unsequenced genomes is often difficult. Here, we describe a rapid and cost-effective strategy to isolate SNPs that exploits the property of the bacteriophage Mu transposition machinery to target mismatched DNA sites and thereby to effectively detect polymorphic loci. To demonstrate the methodology, we isolated 164 SNPs from the unsequenced genome of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia), a much-studied species in population biology, and we validated 24 of them. The strategy involves standard molecular biology techniques as well as undemanding MuA transposase-catalyzed in vitro transposition reactions, and it is applicable to any organism.

    AB - Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) represent a valuable resource for the mapping of human disease genes and induced mutations in model organisms. SNPs may become the markers of choice also for population ecology and evolutionary studies, but their isolation for non-model organisms with unsequenced genomes is often difficult. Here, we describe a rapid and cost-effective strategy to isolate SNPs that exploits the property of the bacteriophage Mu transposition machinery to target mismatched DNA sites and thereby to effectively detect polymorphic loci. To demonstrate the methodology, we isolated 164 SNPs from the unsequenced genome of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia), a much-studied species in population biology, and we validated 24 of them. The strategy involves standard molecular biology techniques as well as undemanding MuA transposase-catalyzed in vitro transposition reactions, and it is applicable to any organism.

    U2 - 10.1093/nar/gkm070

    DO - 10.1093/nar/gkm070

    M3 - Article

    VL - 35

    JO - Nucleic Acids Research

    JF - Nucleic Acids Research

    SN - 0305-1048

    IS - 6, s

    ER -