Social networks and language change in Tudor and Stuart London ‒ only connect?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Place is an integral part of social network analysis, which reconstructs network structures and documents the network members’ linguistic practices in a community. Historical network analysis presents particular challenges in both respects. This article first discusses the kinds of data, official documents, personal letters and diaries that historians have used in reconstructing social networks and communities. These analyses could be enriched by including linguistic data and, vice versa, historical sociolinguistic findings may often be interpreted in terms of social networks.

Focusing on Early Modern London, I present two case studies, the first one investigating a sixteenth-century merchant family exchange network and the second discussing the seventeenth-century naval administrator Samuel Pepys, whose role as a community broker between the City and Westminster is assessed in linguistic terms. My results show how identifying the leaders and laggers of linguistic change can add to our understanding of the varied ways in which linguistic innovations spread to and from Tudor and Stuart London both within and across social networks.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEnglish Language and Linguistics
Volume19
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)269-292
Number of pages24
ISSN1360-6743
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2015
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 6121 Languages
  • Sociolinguistics
  • Historical linguistics
  • Corpus linguistics
  • English linguistics
  • Language change

Cite this

@article{9d61788c53b14913844e25d88f9f7fde,
title = "Social networks and language change in Tudor and Stuart London ‒ only connect?",
abstract = "Place is an integral part of social network analysis, which reconstructs network structures and documents the network members’ linguistic practices in a community. Historical network analysis presents particular challenges in both respects. This article first discusses the kinds of data, official documents, personal letters and diaries that historians have used in reconstructing social networks and communities. These analyses could be enriched by including linguistic data and, vice versa, historical sociolinguistic findings may often be interpreted in terms of social networks.Focusing on Early Modern London, I present two case studies, the first one investigating a sixteenth-century merchant family exchange network and the second discussing the seventeenth-century naval administrator Samuel Pepys, whose role as a community broker between the City and Westminster is assessed in linguistic terms. My results show how identifying the leaders and laggers of linguistic change can add to our understanding of the varied ways in which linguistic innovations spread to and from Tudor and Stuart London both within and across social networks.",
keywords = "6121 Languages, Sociolinguistics, Historical linguistics, Corpus linguistics, English linguistics, Language change",
author = "Terttu Nevalainen",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/S136067431500009X",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "269--292",
journal = "English Language and Linguistics",
issn = "1360-6743",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "2",

}

Social networks and language change in Tudor and Stuart London ‒ only connect? / Nevalainen, Terttu.

In: English Language and Linguistics, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01.07.2015, p. 269-292.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social networks and language change in Tudor and Stuart London ‒ only connect?

AU - Nevalainen, Terttu

PY - 2015/7/1

Y1 - 2015/7/1

N2 - Place is an integral part of social network analysis, which reconstructs network structures and documents the network members’ linguistic practices in a community. Historical network analysis presents particular challenges in both respects. This article first discusses the kinds of data, official documents, personal letters and diaries that historians have used in reconstructing social networks and communities. These analyses could be enriched by including linguistic data and, vice versa, historical sociolinguistic findings may often be interpreted in terms of social networks.Focusing on Early Modern London, I present two case studies, the first one investigating a sixteenth-century merchant family exchange network and the second discussing the seventeenth-century naval administrator Samuel Pepys, whose role as a community broker between the City and Westminster is assessed in linguistic terms. My results show how identifying the leaders and laggers of linguistic change can add to our understanding of the varied ways in which linguistic innovations spread to and from Tudor and Stuart London both within and across social networks.

AB - Place is an integral part of social network analysis, which reconstructs network structures and documents the network members’ linguistic practices in a community. Historical network analysis presents particular challenges in both respects. This article first discusses the kinds of data, official documents, personal letters and diaries that historians have used in reconstructing social networks and communities. These analyses could be enriched by including linguistic data and, vice versa, historical sociolinguistic findings may often be interpreted in terms of social networks.Focusing on Early Modern London, I present two case studies, the first one investigating a sixteenth-century merchant family exchange network and the second discussing the seventeenth-century naval administrator Samuel Pepys, whose role as a community broker between the City and Westminster is assessed in linguistic terms. My results show how identifying the leaders and laggers of linguistic change can add to our understanding of the varied ways in which linguistic innovations spread to and from Tudor and Stuart London both within and across social networks.

KW - 6121 Languages

KW - Sociolinguistics

KW - Historical linguistics

KW - Corpus linguistics

KW - English linguistics

KW - Language change

UR - http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayFulltext?type=6&fid=9800404&jid=ELL&volumeId=19&issueId=02&aid=9800403&bodyId=&membershipNumber=&societyETOCSession=&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S136067431500009X

U2 - 10.1017/S136067431500009X

DO - 10.1017/S136067431500009X

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 269

EP - 292

JO - English Language and Linguistics

JF - English Language and Linguistics

SN - 1360-6743

IS - 2

ER -