SOSAA – A new model to simulate the concentrations of organic vapours, sulphuric acid and aerosols inside the ABL – Part 2: Aerosol dynamics and one case study at a boreal forest site

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Natural and anthropogenic aerosols may have a great impact on climate as they directly interact with solar radiation and indirectly affect the Earth’s radiation balance and precipitation by modifying clouds. In order to quantify the direct and indirect effects, it is essential to understand the complex processes that connect aerosol particles to cloud droplets. Modern measurement techniques are able to detect particle sizes down to 1 nm in diameter, from ground to the stratosphere. However, the data are not sufficient in order to fully understand the processes. Here we demonstrate how the newly developed one-dimensional column model SOSAA was used to investigate the complex processes of aerosols at a boreal forest site for a six-month period during the spring and summer of 2010. Two nucleation mechanisms (kinetic and organic) were tested in this study, and both mechanisms produced a good prediction of the particle number concentrations in spring. However, overestimation of the particle number concentration in summer by the organic mechanism suggests that the OH oxidation products from monoterpenes may not be the essential compounds in atmospheric nucleation. In general, SOSAA was correct in predicting new particle formation events for 35% of the time and partly correct for 45% of the time.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBoreal Environment Research
Volume19
Issue numbersuppl. B
Pages (from-to)237–256
Number of pages20
ISSN1239-6095
Publication statusPublished - 30 Sep 2014
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 114 Physical sciences
  • Atmospheric boundary layer
  • AEROSOL FORMATION
  • ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMATION
  • Biogenic organic compounds

Cite this

@article{c1bc5361e73d40628392a9ada7f06ad5,
title = "SOSAA – A new model to simulate the concentrations of organic vapours, sulphuric acid and aerosols inside the ABL – Part 2: Aerosol dynamics and one case study at a boreal forest site",
abstract = "Natural and anthropogenic aerosols may have a great impact on climate as they directly interact with solar radiation and indirectly affect the Earth’s radiation balance and precipitation by modifying clouds. In order to quantify the direct and indirect effects, it is essential to understand the complex processes that connect aerosol particles to cloud droplets. Modern measurement techniques are able to detect particle sizes down to 1 nm in diameter, from ground to the stratosphere. However, the data are not sufficient in order to fully understand the processes. Here we demonstrate how the newly developed one-dimensional column model SOSAA was used to investigate the complex processes of aerosols at a boreal forest site for a six-month period during the spring and summer of 2010. Two nucleation mechanisms (kinetic and organic) were tested in this study, and both mechanisms produced a good prediction of the particle number concentrations in spring. However, overestimation of the particle number concentration in summer by the organic mechanism suggests that the OH oxidation products from monoterpenes may not be the essential compounds in atmospheric nucleation. In general, SOSAA was correct in predicting new particle formation events for 35{\%} of the time and partly correct for 45{\%} of the time.",
keywords = "114 Physical sciences, Atmospheric boundary layer, AEROSOL FORMATION, ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMATION, Biogenic organic compounds",
author = "Luxi Zhou and Tuomo Nieminen and Ditte Mogensen and Sampo Smolander and Anton Rusanen and Markku Kulmala and Michael Boy",
year = "2014",
month = "9",
day = "30",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "237–256",
journal = "Boreal Environment Research",
issn = "1239-6095",
publisher = "Finnish Environment Institute",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - SOSAA – A new model to simulate the concentrations of organic vapours, sulphuric acid and aerosols inside the ABL – Part 2

T2 - Aerosol dynamics and one case study at a boreal forest site

AU - Zhou, Luxi

AU - Nieminen, Tuomo

AU - Mogensen, Ditte

AU - Smolander, Sampo

AU - Rusanen, Anton

AU - Kulmala, Markku

AU - Boy, Michael

PY - 2014/9/30

Y1 - 2014/9/30

N2 - Natural and anthropogenic aerosols may have a great impact on climate as they directly interact with solar radiation and indirectly affect the Earth’s radiation balance and precipitation by modifying clouds. In order to quantify the direct and indirect effects, it is essential to understand the complex processes that connect aerosol particles to cloud droplets. Modern measurement techniques are able to detect particle sizes down to 1 nm in diameter, from ground to the stratosphere. However, the data are not sufficient in order to fully understand the processes. Here we demonstrate how the newly developed one-dimensional column model SOSAA was used to investigate the complex processes of aerosols at a boreal forest site for a six-month period during the spring and summer of 2010. Two nucleation mechanisms (kinetic and organic) were tested in this study, and both mechanisms produced a good prediction of the particle number concentrations in spring. However, overestimation of the particle number concentration in summer by the organic mechanism suggests that the OH oxidation products from monoterpenes may not be the essential compounds in atmospheric nucleation. In general, SOSAA was correct in predicting new particle formation events for 35% of the time and partly correct for 45% of the time.

AB - Natural and anthropogenic aerosols may have a great impact on climate as they directly interact with solar radiation and indirectly affect the Earth’s radiation balance and precipitation by modifying clouds. In order to quantify the direct and indirect effects, it is essential to understand the complex processes that connect aerosol particles to cloud droplets. Modern measurement techniques are able to detect particle sizes down to 1 nm in diameter, from ground to the stratosphere. However, the data are not sufficient in order to fully understand the processes. Here we demonstrate how the newly developed one-dimensional column model SOSAA was used to investigate the complex processes of aerosols at a boreal forest site for a six-month period during the spring and summer of 2010. Two nucleation mechanisms (kinetic and organic) were tested in this study, and both mechanisms produced a good prediction of the particle number concentrations in spring. However, overestimation of the particle number concentration in summer by the organic mechanism suggests that the OH oxidation products from monoterpenes may not be the essential compounds in atmospheric nucleation. In general, SOSAA was correct in predicting new particle formation events for 35% of the time and partly correct for 45% of the time.

KW - 114 Physical sciences

KW - Atmospheric boundary layer

KW - AEROSOL FORMATION

KW - ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMATION

KW - Biogenic organic compounds

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 237

EP - 256

JO - Boreal Environment Research

JF - Boreal Environment Research

SN - 1239-6095

IS - suppl. B

ER -