The 1.1 Ga North American polarity asymmetry problem in the light of new data from Lake Superior and Arizona rocks

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientific

Abstract

Asymmetric polarities in the western arm of the Logan Loop (1070-1120 Ma) of North America are among the most widely discussed problems in Precambrian paleomagnetism. In Lake Superior rocks, a noticeable reversal asymmetry is visible only in inclination, not in declination, with normal-polarity inclinations being ca. +40° and reversed-polarity inclinations ca. -70°. This is supplemented by an even larger asymmetry observed in coeval Arizona rocks. Based on most recent data from Lake Superior and Arizona, this study uses hypotheses of non-dipolar zonal geomagnetic fields and rapid continental drift to explain the observed differences in normal and reversed-polarity geomagnetic data during 1120-1085 Ma.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2014 Nordic Supercontinent Workshop
Number of pages4
Publication date2014
Pages61-64
Publication statusPublished - 2014
MoE publication typeB3 Article in conference proceedings
Event2014 Nordic Supercontinent Workshop - Hurdal, Norway
Duration: 13 Oct 201419 Oct 2014

Fields of Science

  • 1171 Geosciences

Cite this

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title = "The 1.1 Ga North American polarity asymmetry problem in the light of new data from Lake Superior and Arizona rocks",
abstract = "Asymmetric polarities in the western arm of the Logan Loop (1070-1120 Ma) of North America are among the most widely discussed problems in Precambrian paleomagnetism. In Lake Superior rocks, a noticeable reversal asymmetry is visible only in inclination, not in declination, with normal-polarity inclinations being ca. +40° and reversed-polarity inclinations ca. -70°. This is supplemented by an even larger asymmetry observed in coeval Arizona rocks. Based on most recent data from Lake Superior and Arizona, this study uses hypotheses of non-dipolar zonal geomagnetic fields and rapid continental drift to explain the observed differences in normal and reversed-polarity geomagnetic data during 1120-1085 Ma.",
keywords = "1171 Geosciences",
author = "Veikkolainen, {Toni Henri Kristian} and Lauri Pesonen",
note = "Volume: Proceeding volume:",
year = "2014",
language = "English",
pages = "61--64",
booktitle = "2014 Nordic Supercontinent Workshop",

}

Veikkolainen, THK & Pesonen, L 2014, The 1.1 Ga North American polarity asymmetry problem in the light of new data from Lake Superior and Arizona rocks. in 2014 Nordic Supercontinent Workshop. pp. 61-64, 2014 Nordic Supercontinent Workshop, Hurdal, Norway, 13/10/2014.

The 1.1 Ga North American polarity asymmetry problem in the light of new data from Lake Superior and Arizona rocks. / Veikkolainen, Toni Henri Kristian; Pesonen, Lauri.

2014 Nordic Supercontinent Workshop. 2014. p. 61-64.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientific

TY - GEN

T1 - The 1.1 Ga North American polarity asymmetry problem in the light of new data from Lake Superior and Arizona rocks

AU - Veikkolainen, Toni Henri Kristian

AU - Pesonen, Lauri

N1 - Volume: Proceeding volume:

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Asymmetric polarities in the western arm of the Logan Loop (1070-1120 Ma) of North America are among the most widely discussed problems in Precambrian paleomagnetism. In Lake Superior rocks, a noticeable reversal asymmetry is visible only in inclination, not in declination, with normal-polarity inclinations being ca. +40° and reversed-polarity inclinations ca. -70°. This is supplemented by an even larger asymmetry observed in coeval Arizona rocks. Based on most recent data from Lake Superior and Arizona, this study uses hypotheses of non-dipolar zonal geomagnetic fields and rapid continental drift to explain the observed differences in normal and reversed-polarity geomagnetic data during 1120-1085 Ma.

AB - Asymmetric polarities in the western arm of the Logan Loop (1070-1120 Ma) of North America are among the most widely discussed problems in Precambrian paleomagnetism. In Lake Superior rocks, a noticeable reversal asymmetry is visible only in inclination, not in declination, with normal-polarity inclinations being ca. +40° and reversed-polarity inclinations ca. -70°. This is supplemented by an even larger asymmetry observed in coeval Arizona rocks. Based on most recent data from Lake Superior and Arizona, this study uses hypotheses of non-dipolar zonal geomagnetic fields and rapid continental drift to explain the observed differences in normal and reversed-polarity geomagnetic data during 1120-1085 Ma.

KW - 1171 Geosciences

M3 - Conference contribution

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EP - 64

BT - 2014 Nordic Supercontinent Workshop

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