The Detainee, the Prisoner, and the Refugee: The Dynamics of Violent Subject Production

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This article takes violence in the law seriously, scrutinizing three sites engaged in violent subject production and resistance: the Guantanamo Bay detention center, supermax prisons in the US, and European refugee camps. The concepts of martyring and torturing serve help to untangle the dynamics of the law’s violence. The violent subject production techniques used in these sites are discussed as torture practices that aim to reproduce the dominant subjectivity. As the law has often proved unable to fully address the situation of the detainee, the prisoner, and the refugee, hunger striking as martyring is discussed as a way to deconstruct hegemonic subjectivity and to force the law to face its own violence.
Original languageEnglish
JournalLaw, culture and the humanities
Volume15
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)516-539
Number of pages24
ISSN1743-8721
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 May 2019
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 513 Law
  • Guantanamo Bay
  • supermax prison
  • refugee camp
  • subjectivity
  • detainee
  • prisoner
  • refugee
  • torture
  • martyr
  • resistance
  • hunger strike
  • violence
  • law

Cite this

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abstract = "This article takes violence in the law seriously, scrutinizing three sites engaged in violent subject production and resistance: the Guantanamo Bay detention center, supermax prisons in the US, and European refugee camps. The concepts of martyring and torturing serve help to untangle the dynamics of the law’s violence. The violent subject production techniques used in these sites are discussed as torture practices that aim to reproduce the dominant subjectivity. As the law has often proved unable to fully address the situation of the detainee, the prisoner, and the refugee, hunger striking as martyring is discussed as a way to deconstruct hegemonic subjectivity and to force the law to face its own violence.",
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The Detainee, the Prisoner, and the Refugee : The Dynamics of Violent Subject Production . / Nieminen, Kati.

In: Law, culture and the humanities, Vol. 15, No. 2, 16.05.2019, p. 516-539.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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