Transpiration directly regulates the emissions of water-soluble short-chained OVOCs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Most plant-based emissions of volatile organic compounds are considered mainly temperature dependent. However, certain oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) have high water solubility; thus, also stomatal conductance could regulate their emissions from shoots. Due to their water solubility and sources in stem and roots, it has also been suggested that their emissions could be affected by transport in the xylem sap. Yet further understanding on the role of transport has been lacking until present. We used shoot-scale long-term dynamic flux data from Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris) to analyse the effects of transpiration and transport in xylem sap flow on emissions of 3 water-soluble OVOCs: methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde. We found a direct effect of transpiration on the shoot emissions of the 3 OVOCs. The emissions were best explained by a regression model that combined linear transpiration and exponential temperature effects. In addition, a structural equation model indicated that stomatal conductance affects emissions mainly indirectly, by regulating transpiration. A part of the temperature's effect is also indirect. The tight coupling of shoot emissions to transpiration clearly evidences that these OVOCs are transported in the xylem sap from their sources in roots and stem to leaves and to ambient air.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPlant, Cell and Environment
Volume41
Issue number10
Pages (from-to)2288–2298
Number of pages11
ISSN0140-7791
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2018
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fields of Science

  • 4112 Forestry
  • 1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology
  • acetone
  • acetaldehyde
  • long-distance transport
  • methanol
  • temperature
  • xylem sap
  • ORGANIC-COMPOUND EMISSIONS
  • SPRUCE PICEA-ABIES
  • METHANOL EMISSION
  • VOC EMISSIONS
  • CO2 EFFLUX
  • ENVIRONMENTAL PARAMETERS
  • ACETALDEHYDE EMISSION
  • BOREAL FOREST
  • SAP-FLOW
  • TREES

Cite this

@article{d1831a85c2774cb58d9b266662d57d0b,
title = "Transpiration directly regulates the emissions of water-soluble short-chained OVOCs",
abstract = "Most plant-based emissions of volatile organic compounds are considered mainly temperature dependent. However, certain oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) have high water solubility; thus, also stomatal conductance could regulate their emissions from shoots. Due to their water solubility and sources in stem and roots, it has also been suggested that their emissions could be affected by transport in the xylem sap. Yet further understanding on the role of transport has been lacking until present. We used shoot-scale long-term dynamic flux data from Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris) to analyse the effects of transpiration and transport in xylem sap flow on emissions of 3 water-soluble OVOCs: methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde. We found a direct effect of transpiration on the shoot emissions of the 3 OVOCs. The emissions were best explained by a regression model that combined linear transpiration and exponential temperature effects. In addition, a structural equation model indicated that stomatal conductance affects emissions mainly indirectly, by regulating transpiration. A part of the temperature's effect is also indirect. The tight coupling of shoot emissions to transpiration clearly evidences that these OVOCs are transported in the xylem sap from their sources in roots and stem to leaves and to ambient air.",
keywords = "4112 Forestry, 1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology, acetone, acetaldehyde, long-distance transport, methanol, temperature, xylem sap, ORGANIC-COMPOUND EMISSIONS, SPRUCE PICEA-ABIES, METHANOL EMISSION, VOC EMISSIONS, CO2 EFFLUX, ENVIRONMENTAL PARAMETERS, ACETALDEHYDE EMISSION, BOREAL FOREST, SAP-FLOW, TREES",
author = "Kaisa Rissanen and Teemu H{\"o}ltt{\"a} and Jaana B{\"a}ck",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1111/pce.13318",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "2288–2298",
journal = "Plant, Cell and Environment",
issn = "0140-7791",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "10",

}

Transpiration directly regulates the emissions of water-soluble short-chained OVOCs. / Rissanen, Kaisa; Hölttä, Teemu; Bäck, Jaana.

In: Plant, Cell and Environment, Vol. 41, No. 10, 10.2018, p. 2288–2298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Transpiration directly regulates the emissions of water-soluble short-chained OVOCs

AU - Rissanen, Kaisa

AU - Hölttä, Teemu

AU - Bäck, Jaana

PY - 2018/10

Y1 - 2018/10

N2 - Most plant-based emissions of volatile organic compounds are considered mainly temperature dependent. However, certain oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) have high water solubility; thus, also stomatal conductance could regulate their emissions from shoots. Due to their water solubility and sources in stem and roots, it has also been suggested that their emissions could be affected by transport in the xylem sap. Yet further understanding on the role of transport has been lacking until present. We used shoot-scale long-term dynamic flux data from Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris) to analyse the effects of transpiration and transport in xylem sap flow on emissions of 3 water-soluble OVOCs: methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde. We found a direct effect of transpiration on the shoot emissions of the 3 OVOCs. The emissions were best explained by a regression model that combined linear transpiration and exponential temperature effects. In addition, a structural equation model indicated that stomatal conductance affects emissions mainly indirectly, by regulating transpiration. A part of the temperature's effect is also indirect. The tight coupling of shoot emissions to transpiration clearly evidences that these OVOCs are transported in the xylem sap from their sources in roots and stem to leaves and to ambient air.

AB - Most plant-based emissions of volatile organic compounds are considered mainly temperature dependent. However, certain oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) have high water solubility; thus, also stomatal conductance could regulate their emissions from shoots. Due to their water solubility and sources in stem and roots, it has also been suggested that their emissions could be affected by transport in the xylem sap. Yet further understanding on the role of transport has been lacking until present. We used shoot-scale long-term dynamic flux data from Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris) to analyse the effects of transpiration and transport in xylem sap flow on emissions of 3 water-soluble OVOCs: methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde. We found a direct effect of transpiration on the shoot emissions of the 3 OVOCs. The emissions were best explained by a regression model that combined linear transpiration and exponential temperature effects. In addition, a structural equation model indicated that stomatal conductance affects emissions mainly indirectly, by regulating transpiration. A part of the temperature's effect is also indirect. The tight coupling of shoot emissions to transpiration clearly evidences that these OVOCs are transported in the xylem sap from their sources in roots and stem to leaves and to ambient air.

KW - 4112 Forestry

KW - 1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology

KW - acetone

KW - acetaldehyde

KW - long-distance transport

KW - methanol

KW - temperature

KW - xylem sap

KW - ORGANIC-COMPOUND EMISSIONS

KW - SPRUCE PICEA-ABIES

KW - METHANOL EMISSION

KW - VOC EMISSIONS

KW - CO2 EFFLUX

KW - ENVIRONMENTAL PARAMETERS

KW - ACETALDEHYDE EMISSION

KW - BOREAL FOREST

KW - SAP-FLOW

KW - TREES

U2 - 10.1111/pce.13318

DO - 10.1111/pce.13318

M3 - Article

VL - 41

SP - 2288

EP - 2298

JO - Plant, Cell and Environment

JF - Plant, Cell and Environment

SN - 0140-7791

IS - 10

ER -