Using hierarchical joint models to study reproductive interactions in plant communities

Øystein H. Opedal, Stein Joar Hegland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Abstract 1.Pollinator-mediated reproductive interactions among coflowering plant species are prime examples of how species interactions may affect fitness and community assembly. Despite considerable interest in these issues, statistical methods for assessing signal of reproductive interactions in observational data on coflowering species are currently lacking. 2. We propose a flexible method for quantifying potential reproductive interactions among coflowering plant species using the hierarchical latent-variable joint models implemented in the Hierarchical Modelling of Species Communities (HMSC) framework. The method accommodates any measure of reproductive success, including pollinator visitation, stigma pollen loads, and seed set. We demonstrate the method by analysing a dataset on bumblebee visitation to a set of coflowering plant species in a species-rich meadow in Norway, and provide R tutorials for this and additional data types. 3. The example analysis revealed both positive and negative effects of heterospecific flower abundances on visitation to coflowering species, which we interpret as potential reproductive interactions. 4. Hierarchical joint models provide a flexible approach to analysing patterns of covariation in the reproductive success of coflowering species, thus identifying potential species interactions. Important strengths include explicit consideration of community-level effects and the assessment of residual fitness correlations after controlling for covariates such as flower abundances and phenotypic traits, yielding more complete insights into pollinator-mediated reproductive interactions.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Ecology
Volume0
Issue numberja
ISSN0022-0477
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Sep 2019
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Bibliographical note

doi: 10.1111/1365-2745.13301

Fields of Science

  • competition
  • facilitation
  • hierarchical modelling of species communities
  • natural selection
  • plant-pollinator interactions
  • selection gradient
  • 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology

Cite this

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title = "Using hierarchical joint models to study reproductive interactions in plant communities",
abstract = "Abstract 1.Pollinator-mediated reproductive interactions among coflowering plant species are prime examples of how species interactions may affect fitness and community assembly. Despite considerable interest in these issues, statistical methods for assessing signal of reproductive interactions in observational data on coflowering species are currently lacking. 2. We propose a flexible method for quantifying potential reproductive interactions among coflowering plant species using the hierarchical latent-variable joint models implemented in the Hierarchical Modelling of Species Communities (HMSC) framework. The method accommodates any measure of reproductive success, including pollinator visitation, stigma pollen loads, and seed set. We demonstrate the method by analysing a dataset on bumblebee visitation to a set of coflowering plant species in a species-rich meadow in Norway, and provide R tutorials for this and additional data types. 3. The example analysis revealed both positive and negative effects of heterospecific flower abundances on visitation to coflowering species, which we interpret as potential reproductive interactions. 4. Hierarchical joint models provide a flexible approach to analysing patterns of covariation in the reproductive success of coflowering species, thus identifying potential species interactions. Important strengths include explicit consideration of community-level effects and the assessment of residual fitness correlations after controlling for covariates such as flower abundances and phenotypic traits, yielding more complete insights into pollinator-mediated reproductive interactions.",
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Using hierarchical joint models to study reproductive interactions in plant communities. / Opedal, Øystein H.; Hegland, Stein Joar.

In: Journal of Ecology, Vol. 0, No. ja, 30.09.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using hierarchical joint models to study reproductive interactions in plant communities

AU - Opedal, Øystein H.

AU - Hegland, Stein Joar

N1 - doi: 10.1111/1365-2745.13301

PY - 2019/9/30

Y1 - 2019/9/30

N2 - Abstract 1.Pollinator-mediated reproductive interactions among coflowering plant species are prime examples of how species interactions may affect fitness and community assembly. Despite considerable interest in these issues, statistical methods for assessing signal of reproductive interactions in observational data on coflowering species are currently lacking. 2. We propose a flexible method for quantifying potential reproductive interactions among coflowering plant species using the hierarchical latent-variable joint models implemented in the Hierarchical Modelling of Species Communities (HMSC) framework. The method accommodates any measure of reproductive success, including pollinator visitation, stigma pollen loads, and seed set. We demonstrate the method by analysing a dataset on bumblebee visitation to a set of coflowering plant species in a species-rich meadow in Norway, and provide R tutorials for this and additional data types. 3. The example analysis revealed both positive and negative effects of heterospecific flower abundances on visitation to coflowering species, which we interpret as potential reproductive interactions. 4. Hierarchical joint models provide a flexible approach to analysing patterns of covariation in the reproductive success of coflowering species, thus identifying potential species interactions. Important strengths include explicit consideration of community-level effects and the assessment of residual fitness correlations after controlling for covariates such as flower abundances and phenotypic traits, yielding more complete insights into pollinator-mediated reproductive interactions.

AB - Abstract 1.Pollinator-mediated reproductive interactions among coflowering plant species are prime examples of how species interactions may affect fitness and community assembly. Despite considerable interest in these issues, statistical methods for assessing signal of reproductive interactions in observational data on coflowering species are currently lacking. 2. We propose a flexible method for quantifying potential reproductive interactions among coflowering plant species using the hierarchical latent-variable joint models implemented in the Hierarchical Modelling of Species Communities (HMSC) framework. The method accommodates any measure of reproductive success, including pollinator visitation, stigma pollen loads, and seed set. We demonstrate the method by analysing a dataset on bumblebee visitation to a set of coflowering plant species in a species-rich meadow in Norway, and provide R tutorials for this and additional data types. 3. The example analysis revealed both positive and negative effects of heterospecific flower abundances on visitation to coflowering species, which we interpret as potential reproductive interactions. 4. Hierarchical joint models provide a flexible approach to analysing patterns of covariation in the reproductive success of coflowering species, thus identifying potential species interactions. Important strengths include explicit consideration of community-level effects and the assessment of residual fitness correlations after controlling for covariates such as flower abundances and phenotypic traits, yielding more complete insights into pollinator-mediated reproductive interactions.

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