Weight-related ideals, behaviors and long-term health in young adulthood : studies in young finnish adults

Ulla Kärkkäinen

Research output: ThesisDoctoral ThesisCollection of Articles

Abstract

Obesity with its comorbidities has become a major global public health concern. Young adulthood is a particularly critical period in an individual’s life with respect to his/her risk to become overweight or even obese. However, longitudinal population-based associations of weight-related ideals and behaviors with weight change and health in young adulthood remain poorly understood. The overall aim of this study was to explore the associations of weight-related ideals, behaviors, weight change and health over a timespan of ten years in young adults. The specific aims were to examine whether a discrepancy between actual and ideal weight (from here on ´weight discrepancy´) would be associated with a future weight change; to evaluate the factors associated with long-term successful weight maintenance, and to explore whether disordered eating behaviors have long-term health-related consequences in young adults. A final aim was to assess whether the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2) would be a suitable tool for screening for binge eating disorder (BED) among young women. In total, over 5,000 young women and men were identified from a population-based FinnTwin16 cohort when participants were aged 24 and 34. At age 24, 16 women were identified as suffering from BED as defined in DSM-5. Self-reported height and weight were used to calculate BMI at age 24 and 34. The weight discrepancy was calculated from actual and ideal weight. Weight maintenance was defined as weight maintained within ±5% of baseline BMI. Disordered eating behaviors were assessed using three subscales of the EDI-2 and BED was screened in young women using EDI-2 at age 24. Various self-reported health-related measures were assessed at age 24 and 34. In summary, weight-related ideals and behaviors were significantly associated with weight change, physical and mental health during this time-span of ten years in young adults. Overall, it was observed that these young adults tended to gain weight and only about a quarter of them were able to maintain their weight throughout the ten-year period. Weight discrepancy was not associated with a future weight change even though a clear majority of the young women and almost half of the young men were dissatisfied with their weight. Only two factors predicted long-term weight maintenance in both sexes: Regular eating and having no history of intentional weight loss. Disordered eating behaviors did exert long-term health-related consequences, particularly psychological distress and the EDI-2 appeared to be a suitable screening tool for BED among young women. Weight-related ideals and behaviors are associated not only with future weight change but also with physical and mental health in young adults. Many young adults face a major challenge resisting weight gain. The future weight change is not explained by weight ideals, but instead, by weight-related behaviors such as eating regularly and having no history of dieting. Furthermore, disordered eating behaviors are predictive of longstanding adverse consequences for mental health and general well-being in young adults, and EDI-2 can be used for screening for BED in young women. Future studies should evaluate strategies to support primary weight maintenance and a healthy body image; these are ways to prevent the appearance of the weight-related behaviors associated with weight gain, disordered eating behaviors and consequential health-related problems.
Original languageEnglish
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Keski-Rahkonen, Anna, Supervisor
  • Kaprio, Jaakko, Supervisor
Place of PublicationHelsinki
Publisher
Print ISBNs978-951-51-4578-9
Electronic ISBNs978-951-51-4579-6
Publication statusPublished - 2018
MoE publication typeG5 Doctoral dissertation (article)

Fields of Science

  • Feeding Behavior
  • Feeding and Eating Disorders
  • +complications
  • +epidemiology
  • Binge-Eating Disorder
  • +diagnosis
  • Mental Health
  • Mental Disorders
  • Obesity
  • Bulimia
  • Overweight
  • Waist Circumference
  • Body Mass Index
  • Body Weight Changes
  • Body Weight Maintenance
  • Young Adult
  • Adult
  • Ideal Body Weight
  • Female
  • Male
  • 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health
  • 3124 Neurology and psychiatry
  • 3121 Internal medicine

Cite this

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title = "Weight-related ideals, behaviors and long-term health in young adulthood : studies in young finnish adults",
abstract = "Obesity with its comorbidities has become a major global public health concern. Young adulthood is a particularly critical period in an individual’s life with respect to his/her risk to become overweight or even obese. However, longitudinal population-based associations of weight-related ideals and behaviors with weight change and health in young adulthood remain poorly understood. The overall aim of this study was to explore the associations of weight-related ideals, behaviors, weight change and health over a timespan of ten years in young adults. The specific aims were to examine whether a discrepancy between actual and ideal weight (from here on ´weight discrepancy´) would be associated with a future weight change; to evaluate the factors associated with long-term successful weight maintenance, and to explore whether disordered eating behaviors have long-term health-related consequences in young adults. A final aim was to assess whether the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2) would be a suitable tool for screening for binge eating disorder (BED) among young women. In total, over 5,000 young women and men were identified from a population-based FinnTwin16 cohort when participants were aged 24 and 34. At age 24, 16 women were identified as suffering from BED as defined in DSM-5. Self-reported height and weight were used to calculate BMI at age 24 and 34. The weight discrepancy was calculated from actual and ideal weight. Weight maintenance was defined as weight maintained within ±5{\%} of baseline BMI. Disordered eating behaviors were assessed using three subscales of the EDI-2 and BED was screened in young women using EDI-2 at age 24. Various self-reported health-related measures were assessed at age 24 and 34. In summary, weight-related ideals and behaviors were significantly associated with weight change, physical and mental health during this time-span of ten years in young adults. Overall, it was observed that these young adults tended to gain weight and only about a quarter of them were able to maintain their weight throughout the ten-year period. Weight discrepancy was not associated with a future weight change even though a clear majority of the young women and almost half of the young men were dissatisfied with their weight. Only two factors predicted long-term weight maintenance in both sexes: Regular eating and having no history of intentional weight loss. Disordered eating behaviors did exert long-term health-related consequences, particularly psychological distress and the EDI-2 appeared to be a suitable screening tool for BED among young women. Weight-related ideals and behaviors are associated not only with future weight change but also with physical and mental health in young adults. Many young adults face a major challenge resisting weight gain. The future weight change is not explained by weight ideals, but instead, by weight-related behaviors such as eating regularly and having no history of dieting. Furthermore, disordered eating behaviors are predictive of longstanding adverse consequences for mental health and general well-being in young adults, and EDI-2 can be used for screening for BED in young women. Future studies should evaluate strategies to support primary weight maintenance and a healthy body image; these are ways to prevent the appearance of the weight-related behaviors associated with weight gain, disordered eating behaviors and consequential health-related problems.",
keywords = "Feeding Behavior, Feeding and Eating Disorders, +complications, +epidemiology, Binge-Eating Disorder, +diagnosis, Mental Health, Mental Disorders, Obesity, Bulimia, Overweight, Waist Circumference, Body Mass Index, Body Weight Changes, Body Weight Maintenance, Young Adult, Adult, Ideal Body Weight, Female, Male, 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health, 3124 Neurology and psychiatry, 3121 Internal medicine",
author = "Ulla K{\"a}rkk{\"a}inen",
note = "M1 - 94 s. + liitteet",
year = "2018",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-951-51-4578-9",
publisher = "[U. K{\"a}rkk{\"a}inen]",
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Weight-related ideals, behaviors and long-term health in young adulthood : studies in young finnish adults. / Kärkkäinen, Ulla.

Helsinki : [U. Kärkkäinen], 2018. 94 p.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral ThesisCollection of Articles

TY - THES

T1 - Weight-related ideals, behaviors and long-term health in young adulthood : studies in young finnish adults

AU - Kärkkäinen, Ulla

N1 - M1 - 94 s. + liitteet

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Obesity with its comorbidities has become a major global public health concern. Young adulthood is a particularly critical period in an individual’s life with respect to his/her risk to become overweight or even obese. However, longitudinal population-based associations of weight-related ideals and behaviors with weight change and health in young adulthood remain poorly understood. The overall aim of this study was to explore the associations of weight-related ideals, behaviors, weight change and health over a timespan of ten years in young adults. The specific aims were to examine whether a discrepancy between actual and ideal weight (from here on ´weight discrepancy´) would be associated with a future weight change; to evaluate the factors associated with long-term successful weight maintenance, and to explore whether disordered eating behaviors have long-term health-related consequences in young adults. A final aim was to assess whether the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2) would be a suitable tool for screening for binge eating disorder (BED) among young women. In total, over 5,000 young women and men were identified from a population-based FinnTwin16 cohort when participants were aged 24 and 34. At age 24, 16 women were identified as suffering from BED as defined in DSM-5. Self-reported height and weight were used to calculate BMI at age 24 and 34. The weight discrepancy was calculated from actual and ideal weight. Weight maintenance was defined as weight maintained within ±5% of baseline BMI. Disordered eating behaviors were assessed using three subscales of the EDI-2 and BED was screened in young women using EDI-2 at age 24. Various self-reported health-related measures were assessed at age 24 and 34. In summary, weight-related ideals and behaviors were significantly associated with weight change, physical and mental health during this time-span of ten years in young adults. Overall, it was observed that these young adults tended to gain weight and only about a quarter of them were able to maintain their weight throughout the ten-year period. Weight discrepancy was not associated with a future weight change even though a clear majority of the young women and almost half of the young men were dissatisfied with their weight. Only two factors predicted long-term weight maintenance in both sexes: Regular eating and having no history of intentional weight loss. Disordered eating behaviors did exert long-term health-related consequences, particularly psychological distress and the EDI-2 appeared to be a suitable screening tool for BED among young women. Weight-related ideals and behaviors are associated not only with future weight change but also with physical and mental health in young adults. Many young adults face a major challenge resisting weight gain. The future weight change is not explained by weight ideals, but instead, by weight-related behaviors such as eating regularly and having no history of dieting. Furthermore, disordered eating behaviors are predictive of longstanding adverse consequences for mental health and general well-being in young adults, and EDI-2 can be used for screening for BED in young women. Future studies should evaluate strategies to support primary weight maintenance and a healthy body image; these are ways to prevent the appearance of the weight-related behaviors associated with weight gain, disordered eating behaviors and consequential health-related problems.

AB - Obesity with its comorbidities has become a major global public health concern. Young adulthood is a particularly critical period in an individual’s life with respect to his/her risk to become overweight or even obese. However, longitudinal population-based associations of weight-related ideals and behaviors with weight change and health in young adulthood remain poorly understood. The overall aim of this study was to explore the associations of weight-related ideals, behaviors, weight change and health over a timespan of ten years in young adults. The specific aims were to examine whether a discrepancy between actual and ideal weight (from here on ´weight discrepancy´) would be associated with a future weight change; to evaluate the factors associated with long-term successful weight maintenance, and to explore whether disordered eating behaviors have long-term health-related consequences in young adults. A final aim was to assess whether the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2) would be a suitable tool for screening for binge eating disorder (BED) among young women. In total, over 5,000 young women and men were identified from a population-based FinnTwin16 cohort when participants were aged 24 and 34. At age 24, 16 women were identified as suffering from BED as defined in DSM-5. Self-reported height and weight were used to calculate BMI at age 24 and 34. The weight discrepancy was calculated from actual and ideal weight. Weight maintenance was defined as weight maintained within ±5% of baseline BMI. Disordered eating behaviors were assessed using three subscales of the EDI-2 and BED was screened in young women using EDI-2 at age 24. Various self-reported health-related measures were assessed at age 24 and 34. In summary, weight-related ideals and behaviors were significantly associated with weight change, physical and mental health during this time-span of ten years in young adults. Overall, it was observed that these young adults tended to gain weight and only about a quarter of them were able to maintain their weight throughout the ten-year period. Weight discrepancy was not associated with a future weight change even though a clear majority of the young women and almost half of the young men were dissatisfied with their weight. Only two factors predicted long-term weight maintenance in both sexes: Regular eating and having no history of intentional weight loss. Disordered eating behaviors did exert long-term health-related consequences, particularly psychological distress and the EDI-2 appeared to be a suitable screening tool for BED among young women. Weight-related ideals and behaviors are associated not only with future weight change but also with physical and mental health in young adults. Many young adults face a major challenge resisting weight gain. The future weight change is not explained by weight ideals, but instead, by weight-related behaviors such as eating regularly and having no history of dieting. Furthermore, disordered eating behaviors are predictive of longstanding adverse consequences for mental health and general well-being in young adults, and EDI-2 can be used for screening for BED in young women. Future studies should evaluate strategies to support primary weight maintenance and a healthy body image; these are ways to prevent the appearance of the weight-related behaviors associated with weight gain, disordered eating behaviors and consequential health-related problems.

KW - Feeding Behavior

KW - Feeding and Eating Disorders

KW - +complications

KW - +epidemiology

KW - Binge-Eating Disorder

KW - +diagnosis

KW - Mental Health

KW - Mental Disorders

KW - Obesity

KW - Bulimia

KW - Overweight

KW - Waist Circumference

KW - Body Mass Index

KW - Body Weight Changes

KW - Body Weight Maintenance

KW - Young Adult

KW - Adult

KW - Ideal Body Weight

KW - Female

KW - Male

KW - 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health

KW - 3124 Neurology and psychiatry

KW - 3121 Internal medicine

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

SN - 978-951-51-4578-9

PB - [U. Kärkkäinen]

CY - Helsinki

ER -