Zinc lozenges and vitamin C for high-performance athletes: [eLetter]

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateScientific

Abstract

In their International Olympic Committee consensus statement, Maughan et al. reviewed the evidence for dietary supplements for high-performance athletes.
They wrote in regard to zinc that “Cochrane review shows benefit of [using] zinc acetate lozenges (75 mg) to decrease duration of URS [upper respiratory symptoms]”. This statement was based on their reading of the Cochrane review (2013) by Singh and Das, which was withdrawn in 2015 because of plagiarism. In addition, the same Cochrane review had a large number of other severe problems. In the above statement, Maughan et al. imply that only zinc acetate lozenges are effective; however, a recent meta-analysis showed that, up until 2017 at least, there was no evidence that zinc gluconate lozenges are less effective than zinc acetate lozenges...
Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
ISSN0306-3674
Publication statusPublished - 2 May 2018
MoE publication typeB1 Journal article

Fields of Science

  • 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health

Cite this

@article{5c248d82830b4417af7af208628b52f6,
title = "Zinc lozenges and vitamin C for high-performance athletes: [eLetter]",
abstract = "In their International Olympic Committee consensus statement, Maughan et al. reviewed the evidence for dietary supplements for high-performance athletes. They wrote in regard to zinc that “Cochrane review shows benefit of [using] zinc acetate lozenges (75 mg) to decrease duration of URS [upper respiratory symptoms]”. This statement was based on their reading of the Cochrane review (2013) by Singh and Das, which was withdrawn in 2015 because of plagiarism. In addition, the same Cochrane review had a large number of other severe problems. In the above statement, Maughan et al. imply that only zinc acetate lozenges are effective; however, a recent meta-analysis showed that, up until 2017 at least, there was no evidence that zinc gluconate lozenges are less effective than zinc acetate lozenges...",
keywords = "3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health",
author = "Harri Hemil{\"a}",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "2",
language = "English",
journal = "British Journal of Sports Medicine",
issn = "0306-3674",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group Ltd",

}

Zinc lozenges and vitamin C for high-performance athletes : [eLetter]. / Hemilä, Harri .

In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, 02.05.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateScientific

TY - JOUR

T1 - Zinc lozenges and vitamin C for high-performance athletes

T2 - [eLetter]

AU - Hemilä, Harri

PY - 2018/5/2

Y1 - 2018/5/2

N2 - In their International Olympic Committee consensus statement, Maughan et al. reviewed the evidence for dietary supplements for high-performance athletes. They wrote in regard to zinc that “Cochrane review shows benefit of [using] zinc acetate lozenges (75 mg) to decrease duration of URS [upper respiratory symptoms]”. This statement was based on their reading of the Cochrane review (2013) by Singh and Das, which was withdrawn in 2015 because of plagiarism. In addition, the same Cochrane review had a large number of other severe problems. In the above statement, Maughan et al. imply that only zinc acetate lozenges are effective; however, a recent meta-analysis showed that, up until 2017 at least, there was no evidence that zinc gluconate lozenges are less effective than zinc acetate lozenges...

AB - In their International Olympic Committee consensus statement, Maughan et al. reviewed the evidence for dietary supplements for high-performance athletes. They wrote in regard to zinc that “Cochrane review shows benefit of [using] zinc acetate lozenges (75 mg) to decrease duration of URS [upper respiratory symptoms]”. This statement was based on their reading of the Cochrane review (2013) by Singh and Das, which was withdrawn in 2015 because of plagiarism. In addition, the same Cochrane review had a large number of other severe problems. In the above statement, Maughan et al. imply that only zinc acetate lozenges are effective; however, a recent meta-analysis showed that, up until 2017 at least, there was no evidence that zinc gluconate lozenges are less effective than zinc acetate lozenges...

KW - 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health

M3 - Comment/debate

JO - British Journal of Sports Medicine

JF - British Journal of Sports Medicine

SN - 0306-3674

ER -